Mobile Media Ministry Training 3- Mobile Media in Ministry Strategy-Culturally Appropriate Media

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Part of a four day training on mobile media production and distribution for ministry. Covers the role of mobile media in an outreach strategy and the issues involved at the intersection of media and cultures.

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  • If you look at the 72 “Fruitful Practices” that have been identified from successful church planting efforts in the Muslim world you will find that mobile ministry enables several of these fruitful practices.
  • Storying the Bible is being recognized more and more as being vital to hearers’ comprehension of the gospel. Even after ten years on the ground, though, this was often the kind of look I would receive when I tried to share the Gospel in a story form. I have never been a good storyteller in English and I didn’t get any better in Arabic. When we started sharing via the dramatized Bible stories that Wycliffe had developed for the Bedouin we found we got much better reception and comprehension. Well-done gospel poetry recordings that had been composed and recited by MBBs also really helped.
  • While not many of us could necessarily create our own website most of us I’m sure can record a voice message on a phone answering machine. That simple recording can become an outreach tool (learn more at How-To #6: “Phonesite” Outreach- http://www.mobileadvance.org/index.php/how-to/131-how-to-6-qphonesiteq-outreach).
  • microSD cards are tiny and discrete and allow secret believers to be discipled in even the most difficult/closed of settings.
  • According to my contacts at MAF-LT, 90% of Christians who leave their home setting in order to be trained as church leaders never return to their original setting whether they be leaving from their home village and going to the city to receive that training or going overseas to be trained. Additionally, those who do return often find it very difficult to implement the learning that they had received while separated from their “real life” living and ministry situation.
  • Some groups are now redeeming a technology that seems straight from the pit- customer service voice mailbox systems. They are using it to enable Christians to call in and access any and all audio materials available in their language using even the lowliest of “dumbphones”. Using such services ministries can deliver segments of audio and then break in with question and answer times which enable ascertainment of the individual’s comprehension of what they’ve heard and appropriate follow-on teaching whether remedial or continuing. The application of this technology for Theological Education by Extension (TEE) could allow leaders to be developed in their home villages requiring nothing more than that they have the dumbest of dumbphones.
  • This can be developed into a full-orbed outreach using Interactive Voice Response (IVR) voice mailbox systems like FreedomFone (http://freedomfone.org/).
  • The possibly overly serene/inexpressive Jesus
  • What a radically different Jesus is presented in “Matthew”- he is continually smiling, seemingly joyful.
  • Mobile Media Ministry Training 3- Mobile Media in Ministry Strategy-Culturally Appropriate Media

    1. 1. Mobile Media in Ministry Strategy
    2. 2. Your ministry goals and mobile media’s role in achieving them As table groups, discuss: 1) Your ministries’ main objective/goal 2) A way you could see mobile media assisting in the achievement of that objective/goal
    3. 3. A Biblical Basis for Media in Ministry (!?!) Verses Examples Principles
    4. 4. A Biblical Basis for Media in Ministry (!?!) Verses Examples Principles
    5. 5. The Christian religion itself is a religion of communication with a communicator God who has utilized a wide variety of media Soggard Media in Church and Mission
    6. 6. Mobile Media and Evangelism (including “pre-Evangelism”)
    7. 7. 1. Prayer 2. Abundant Gospel sowing 3. Intentional church planting 4. Scriptural authority 5. Local leadership 6. Lay leadership 7. Cell or house churches 8. Churches planting churches 9. Rapid reproduction 10. Healthy churches
    8. 8. 1. Prayer 2. Abundant Gospel sowing 3. Intentional church planting 4. Scriptural authority 5. Local leadership 6. Lay leadership 7. Cell or house churches 8. Churches planting churches 9. Rapid reproduction 10. Healthy churches
    9. 9. In Church Planting Movements, hundreds and even thousands of individuals are hearing the claims that Jesus Christ has on their lives. This sowing often relies heavily upon mass media evangelism, but it always includes personal evangelism with vivid testimonies to the lifechanging power of the gospel.
    10. 10. Fruitful Practices
    11. 11. Fruitful Practice Fruitful workers share the gospel in ways that fit the learning preferences of their audience.
    12. 12. Orality Illiterate Functionally Illiterate Post-Literate Non-Readers Readers Bible Readers
    13. 13. Enabling Storying
    14. 14. Mobile Media and Discipleship
    15. 15. Fruitful Practice Fruitful workers disciple in locally appropriate and reproducible ways.
    16. 16. “Phonesite” Outreach
    17. 17. CGNet Swara (India) Picture something like this being done for discipleship and church growth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZJS7btg0R4
    18. 18. Fruitful Practice Fruitful workers disciple others in settings that fit the situation.
    19. 19. The Bible at Your Fingertip
    20. 20. The only library some will ever have books audio video
    21. 21. Mobile Media and Leadership Development
    22. 22. Fruitful Practice Fruitful workers prefer to develop leaders locally
    23. 23. 90% Leave
    24. 24. Media and the Gathering/ Fellowshipping of Believers Your turn…
    25. 25. Media and the Gathering/ Fellowshipping of Believers Your turn…
    26. 26. New media in a new media landscape
    27. 27. From Consumers
    28. 28. To “Prosumers”
    29. 29. A two-way street?
    30. 30. A two-way street?
    31. 31. Who do you believe?
    32. 32. Shirky Video http://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_how_cellphones_twitter_facebook_can_make_ history.html
    33. 33. A Couple Radical Thoughts • What if media is less about persuading and more about identifying? (Push vs. Pull) • What if the community-building and response systems aspects are more important than the actual content? Courtesy Tom Khazoyan, 10X Productions, Adding Fizz to Your Vids and Frank Preston, Push vs. Pull Media in Movements (http://www.mobileministryforum.org/pullvspushmedia)
    34. 34. A Couple Radical Thoughts • What if media is less about persuading and more about identifying? (Push vs. Pull) • What if the community-building and response systems aspects are more important than the actual content? Courtesy Adding Fizz to Your Vids (conference presentations) and Frank Preston, Push vs. Pull Media in Movements (http://www.mobileministryforum.org/pullvspushmedia)
    35. 35. Appropriate Media Subject Matter: • Does it address their needs/concerns or ours?  Heaven as hell for a Buddhist Presentation: • Are there elements that call out the media as foreign/”other”  Is Jesus a white man?  Are closing credits in English helpful?
    36. 36. Appropriate Media Subject Matter: • Does it address their needs/concerns or ours?  Heaven as hell for a Buddhist Presentation: • Are there elements that call out the media as foreign/”other”  Is Jesus a white man?  Are closing credits in English helpful?
    37. 37. Appropriate Media Subject Matter: • Does it address their needs/concerns or ours?  Heaven as hell for a Buddhist Presentation: • Are there elements that call out the media as foreign/”other”  Is Jesus a white man?  Are closing credits in English helpful?
    38. 38. Appropriate Media Subject Matter: • Does it address their needs/concerns or ours?  Heaven as hell for a Buddhist Presentation: • Are there elements that call out the media as foreign/”other”  Is Jesus a white man?  Are closing credits in English helpful?
    39. 39. Appropriate Media Subject Matter: • Does it address their needs/concerns or ours?  Heaven as hell for a Buddhist Presentation: • Are there elements that call out the media as foreign/”other”  Is Jesus a white man?  Are closing credits in English helpful?
    40. 40. Appropriate Media Presentation (continued): • Are there elements of the presentation that send a message other than the one we want them to “hear”?
    41. 41. While watching the "JESUS" film in the forest region of Guinea, West Africa, audiences are reported to have understood Jesus as a successful traditional priest or marabout. From their cultural context it is obvious to them that Jesus keeps his fetishes, from which he draws his powers, in the bag he carries with him. (Wiher 1997:70) Merz, Johannes Translation and the Visual Predicament of the ''JESUS'' Film in West Africa http://mis.sagepub.com/content/38/2/111.full.pdf
    42. 42. Particularly during the time of his ministry, Jesus is depicted as exemplary and immaculate, merging the conventions of Hollywood with the evangelical pietistic tradition. The makers seem to have tried to remain as neutral, and for that reason inexpressive, as they can, creating an image of human distance Merz, Johannes Translation and the Visual Predicament of the ''JESUS'' Film in West Africa http://mis.sagepub.com/content/38/2/111.full.pdf
    43. 43. Appropriate Media Presentation (continued): • Is it orally/visually appropriate for them? each culture has its own form of art, and hence its own visual language: "the transposer [of Scripture to film] must therefore know all about the art of the culture of the people he is trying to communicate to" Merz, Johannes Translation and the Visual Predicament of the ''JESUS'' Film in West Africa http://mis.sagepub.com/content/38/2/111.full.pdf
    44. 44. Film reproduces visual cultural symbols that become part of the visual language of film that can be easily read and directly understood by an audience who shares the same cultural and ideological background as the filmmaker. The shared context between filmmaker and audience allows the latter to infer the intended meaning of a film to a high degree Merz, Johannes Translation and the Visual Predicament of the ''JESUS'' Film in West Africa http://mis.sagepub.com/content/38/2/111.full.pdf
    45. 45. An in-depth and systematic explanation of how the skills bound up with alphabetic literacy shape visual narrative- and how an unavailability or dismissal of these skills fundamentally shapes visual narrative, too. http://www.film-philosophy.com/index.php/f-p/article/view/896/841
    46. 46. Perhaps nothing could be more foreign to audiences accustomed to the ambiguity and restraint of Western (European and American) art cinema than the exaggerated emotionality and tortuous narratives of Hindi film. Spontaneous musical interludes, bombastic declarations of love and revenge and camerawork amplified to reinforce the extremities of emotional intensity and physical violence featured in the narrative would only be employed in an ironic sense in most films produced in the West, where subtlety and ambiguity are often the hallmarks of artistic worth. A lack of mutual appreciation, and even of basic comprehension, often exists between these two widely disparate forms of cinema and their respective audiences http://www.film-philosophy.com/index.php/f-p/article/view/896/841
    47. 47. • Oral films are non-utilitarian in structure, with many digressions that do little to further the plot. • Their tone is exaggerated and melodramatic, and they are often employed in the espousal of conservative ideology. • Oral modes of communication impart knowledge that cannot be preserved in print, and are thus geared towards making information as easy to absorb as possible; hence the hyperbolic cinematographic style and simplistic ideology of orally-inflected films Sheila J. Nayar (2010) Cinematically Speaking: The Orality-Literacy Paradigm for Visual Narrative
    48. 48. • Oral films are non-utilitarian in structure, with many digressions that do little to further the plot. • Their tone is exaggerated and melodramatic, and they are often employed in the espousal of conservative ideology. • Oral modes of communication impart knowledge that cannot be preserved in print, and are thus geared towards making information as easy to absorb as possible; hence the hyperbolic cinematographic style and simplistic ideology of orally-inflected films Sheila J. Nayar (2010) Cinematically Speaking: The Orality-Literacy Paradigm for Visual Narrative
    49. 49. • Oral films are non-utilitarian in structure, with many digressions that do little to further the plot. • Their tone is exaggerated and melodramatic, and they are often employed in the espousal of conservative ideology. • Oral modes of communication impart knowledge that cannot be preserved in print, and are thus geared towards making information as easy to absorb as possible; hence the hyperbolic cinematographic style and simplistic ideology of orally-inflected films Sheila J. Nayar (2010) Cinematically Speaking: The Orality-Literacy Paradigm for Visual Narrative
    50. 50. • Oral films are non-utilitarian in structure, with many digressions that do little to further the plot. • Their tone is exaggerated and melodramatic, and they are often employed in the espousal of conservative ideology. • Oral modes of communication impart knowledge that cannot be preserved in print, and are thus geared towards making information as easy to absorb as possible; hence the hyperbolic cinematographic style and simplistic ideology of orally-inflected films Sheila J. Nayar (2010) Cinematically Speaking: The Orality-Literacy Paradigm for Visual Narrative
    51. 51. • Oral films are non-utilitarian in structure, with many digressions that do little to further the plot. • Their tone is exaggerated and melodramatic, and they are often employed in the espousal of conservative ideology. • Oral modes of communication impart knowledge that cannot be preserved in print, and are thus geared towards making information as easy to absorb as possible; hence the hyperbolic cinematographic style and simplistic ideology of orally-inflected films Sheila J. Nayar (2010) Cinematically Speaking: The Orality-Literacy Paradigm for Visual Narrative
    52. 52. • Exaggeration and repetition of character traits and actions within masala films render their stories easier to remember and more enjoyable for illiterate viewers, who are accustomed to acquiring and maintaining information through processes of verbal reiteration rather than relying on written records as the basis of knowledge. • Stereotyped characters (such as flawless heroes, irredeemably evil villains and chaste and beautiful princesses) reflect the Manichean structure of oral narratives, in which a clearly defined moral universe aids in understanding and retention Sheila J. Nayar (2010) Cinematically Speaking: The Orality-Literacy Paradigm for Visual Narrative
    53. 53. • Exaggeration and repetition of character traits and actions within masala films render their stories easier to remember and more enjoyable for illiterate viewers, who are accustomed to acquiring and maintaining information through processes of verbal reiteration rather than relying on written records as the basis of knowledge. • Stereotyped characters (such as flawless heroes, irredeemably evil villains and chaste and beautiful princesses) reflect the Manichean structure of oral narratives, in which a clearly defined moral universe aids in understanding and retention Sheila J. Nayar (2010) Cinematically Speaking: The Orality-Literacy Paradigm for Visual Narrative
    54. 54. Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status
    55. 55. Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status
    56. 56. Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status
    57. 57. 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project
    58. 58. 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project
    59. 59. 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project
    60. 60. 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project
    61. 61. 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project
    62. 62. 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project
    63. 63. 1) Who is the intended audience? The more specific you can get the better: - Ethnicity - Age group - Location - Occupation - Media preferences - Spiritual status (disinterested, curious, seeker, engaged, involved) - Socio-economic status Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project
    64. 64. 2) What do you want them to feel, think, value or do after experiencing your media project? The more specific you can get the better Two questions that must be answered before starting a media project
    65. 65. Mobile Media Project Worksheets •Purpose of this exercise •Worksheet walk-through and questions
    66. 66. In your table groups share the project you have begun outlining and, as a group, brainstorm ideas that could help each project have maximum effectiveness
    67. 67. Visual Narrative Structure and Form Oral • Flashbacks and digressions that may or may not advance a normative plot • Repetition, recycling, formula privileging • Spectacle (flat surface- a “cinema of attractions”) • Narrative closure (no ambivalent or open endings) Literate • The use of a normative plot involving the three act structure and Freytag pyramid of action • Originality • Anti-spectacle • Lack of narrative closure (ambivalent endings, open endings) Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    68. 68. Oral • Flashbacks and digressions that may or may not advance a normative plot • Repetition, recycling, formula privileging • Spectacle (flat surface- a “cinema of attractions”) • Narrative closure (no ambivalent or open endings) Literate • The use of a normative plot involving the three act structure and Freytag pyramid of action • Originality • Anti-spectacle • Lack of narrative closure (ambivalent endings, open endings) Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121 Visual Narrative Structure and Form
    69. 69. Oral • Flashbacks and digressions that may or may not advance a normative plot • Repetition, recycling, formula privileging • Spectacle (flat surface- a “cinema of attractions”) • Narrative closure (no ambivalent or open endings) Literate • The use of a normative plot involving the three act structure and Freytag pyramid of action • Originality • Anti-spectacle • Lack of narrative closure (ambivalent endings, open endings) Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121 Visual Narrative Structure and Form
    70. 70. Oral • Flashbacks and digressions that may or may not advance a normative plot • Repetition, recycling, formula privileging • Spectacle (flat surface- a “cinema of attractions”) • Narrative closure (no ambivalent or open endings) Literate • The use of a normative plot involving the three act structure and Freytag pyramid of action • Originality • Anti-spectacle • Lack of narrative closure (ambivalent endings, open endings) Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121 Visual Narrative Structure and Form
    71. 71. Visual Narrative Visual, Verbal and Aural Tone Oral • Inflated melodrama violence • Amplified characters and settings • Frontality (obviousness) Literate • Restraint/quietude • Understated “nuanced” characters and settings • Nuance and subtlety Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    72. 72. Visual Narrative Visual, Verbal and Aural Tone Oral • Inflated melodrama violence • Amplified characters and settings • Frontality (obviousness) Literate • Restraint/quietude • Understated “nuanced” characters and settings • Nuance and subtlety Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    73. 73. Visual Narrative Visual, Verbal and Aural Tone Oral • Inflated melodrama violence • Amplified characters and settings • Frontality (obviousness) Literate • Restraint/quietude • Understated “nuanced” characters and settings • Nuance and subtlety Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    74. 74. Visual Narrative Visual, Verbal and Aural Tone Oral • Redundancy/ repetition • Use of cliches, proverbs • Plain meanings Literate • Restraint and non- redundancy • Lack of “formulaic” language • Ambiguous meanings that must be deduced Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    75. 75. Visual Narrative Visual, Verbal and Aural Tone Oral • Redundancy/ repetition • Use of cliches, proverbs • Plain meanings Literate • Restraint and non- redundancy • Lack of “formulaic” language • Ambiguous meanings that must be deduced Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    76. 76. Visual Narrative Visual, Verbal and Aural Tone Oral • Redundancy/ repetition • Use of cliches, proverbs • Plain meanings Literate • Restraint and non- redundancy • Lack of “formulaic” language • Ambiguous meanings that must be deduced Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    77. 77. Visual Narrative Worldview and Orientation Oral • Polarized/Black and White • Non-psychological orientation • Concerned solely with present events Literate • Non-polarized/ Grayness • Psychological orientation • Concerned with historical factors effecting present Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    78. 78. Visual Narrative Worldview and Orientation Oral • Polarized/Black and White • Non-psychological orientation • Concerned solely with present events Literate • Non-polarized/ Grayness • Psychological orientation • Concerned with historical factors effecting present Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121
    79. 79. Visual Narrative Worldview and Orientation Oral • Polarized/Black and White • Non-psychological orientation • Concerned solely with present events Literate • Non-polarized/ Grayness • Psychological orientation • Concerned with historical factors effecting present Nayar Cinematically Speaking p121

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