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    Social media at school Social media at school Presentation Transcript

    • The Future of Learning: Steve Wheeler University of Plymouth, UK LearnTEC, Karlsruhe, Germany: 2 February 2011
    • Digital Learning Futuresprolearn-academy.org Steve Wheeler Plymouth University
    • Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012Where have we come from? http://photos.jeremybrooks.net/?p=65
    • The Future...? Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011It is very difficult to predict the future.It’s difficult to even predict what willhappen in the next year. www.abebooks.com
    • The Future...? When he saw a demonstration of Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 the telephone in1880, a U.S Mayordeclared: “One day every town inAmerica will have a telephone!” www.abebooks.com
    • Source: Kelly Hodgkins http://gizmodo.com/5813875/what-happens-in-60-seconds-on-the-internet
    • Social media and learning
    • So Me use >260 Million Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012 >200 Million 2 Billion views/day 24 hours/minute Source: http://econsultancy.com
    • Social networks and digital tribesSteve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012
    • Wisdom of crowds? Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 Learning User generated content
    • Architecture of participation Sharing Collaborating Tools Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011Tagging Learning 2.0 User generated Voting content Networking
    • http://www.geeky-gadgets.com
    • Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012 Twitter as a libraryTwitter as a street corner Twitter as a soapbox Twitter as amplification
    • What my students said about Twitter... Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012 http://jcbarrington.blogspot.com/2011/05/on-twitter.html
    • Digital Content Curation www.scoop.it/t/future-school Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • ‘New’ learners are...• more self-directed Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012• better equipped to capture information• more reliant on feedback from peers• more inclined to collaborate• more oriented toward being their own “nodes of production”.Education Trends | Featured NewsJohn K. Waters—13 December 2011 http://coolshots.blogspot.com/2007_02_01_archive.html
    • ‘New’ learners are...• more self-directed Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012• better equipped to capture information• more reliant on feedback from peers• more inclined to collaborate• more oriented toward being their own “nodes of production”.Education Trends | Featured NewsJohn K. Waters—13 December 2011 http://coolshots.blogspot.com/2007_02_01_archive.html
    • http://www.csmonitor.com Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012
    • Coloured caps Camera Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2010 Projector Coloured caps MirrorPhone blogs.fayobserver.com MIT’s “Sixth Sense” Wearable...
    • Web meets World cc Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2010 Camera Mobile phone Haptic GPS Mash-upProjector QR codes Personalised 3-D Geotagging Communication Geomapping Navigation Video Bar codes Browser Ambient
    • Learners need ‘digital wisdom’ Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012
    • “60% of all Internet pages contain misleading Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012 information.” - Thomas EdisonLearners need ‘digital literacies’
    • Managing identity language cc Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2010name personal data interactionidentity reputation images privacy privacy legacy netiquette avatar reputation images interaction Learnersname e-safety need
    • Learners will need new ‘literacies’• Social networking Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012• Privacy maintenance• Identity management• Creating content• Organising content• Reusing and repurposing• Filtering and selecting• Self presenting http://www.mopocket.com/
    • Learners will need new ‘literacies’• Social networking Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011• Privacy maintenance• Identity management• Creating content• Organising content• Reusing and repurposing• Filtering and selecting• Self broadcasting http://www.mopocket.com/
    • “Knowledge thatis acquired under Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012compulsionobtains no holdon the mind.” Plato- Socrates http://www.fotopedia.com/items/flickr-713124904
    • Here’s a problem for teachers: Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 “For the first time we are preparing students for a future we cannot clearly describe.” - David Warlickhttp://communications.nottingham.ac.uk/podcasts/
    • Formal and Informal learning Shouldn’t we now start to blend formal and informal learning? Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 Formal Learning Informal Learning 20% 80% Source: Cofer, D. (2000). Informal Workplace Learning.
    • Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 Is learning simply about gainingwww.newmediamusings.com knowledge...?
    • connections?... or about making Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • http://zumu.com Funnels and Webs Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 One size does not fit all Participation, not passive reception of knowledge Ivan Illich
    • “Its not what youknow that countsanymore. Its what Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011you can learn.”– Don Tapscott Connections to your community of practice http://www.nationalpost.com
    • http://socialenterpriseambassadors.org.uk Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • http://socialenterpriseambassadors.org.uk .....are not the same as... Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • Engaging and fun!Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • anytime Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 personalised anyplacehttp://ithalas.com
    • Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011http://www.flickr.com/photos/luc/ Personalised Learning?
    • Personalisation of learning means ensuring that individual differences are acknowledged Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • Personal Learning Environments PLEs are not only personal web tools and personal learning networks. PLEs are much wider than this, taking in experiences and Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 Personal realia, as well as learning through TV, music, paper Learning Personal based materials, radio & Network Learning more formal contexts. Environment Learning content is not as important now as where (or who) to connect to, to find it. Personal PWTs are any web tools, Web Tools (usually Web 2.0) chosen by learners to support their lifelong learning. Source: http://steve-wheeler.blogspot.com/2010/07/anatomy-of-ple.html
    • Intuitive handheld devices Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011Natural gesture interface Connection to my learning network Source: Maria Webster - http://www.ntdaily.com/
    • Communication Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 Online, En masse http://steve-wheeler.blogspot.com
    • CollaborationSteve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • http://www.eastone.co.uk/ Web 2.0 Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011Social Media gives everyone a voice in the community http://www.uksmallbusinesswebsites.co.uk
    • Moblogging Blogging on the move to capture images, sounds, experiences Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 http://www.lifehack.org
    • Microblogging Retweeting is not repetition. It is amplification. http://www.xenstudio.co.uk - Steve Wheeler
    • Microblogging has potential for the future of learning - - if we see it as a new Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 communication Channel - Ebner et alhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/161/
    • Media Sharing Video, audio and images ... Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 ... all contribute to the richness of the narrative. http://flickr.com/photos/22409393@N03/4348233990/
    • Collaborative tools Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 http://media1.break.com/
    • Social LearningHuman activities are Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 mediated byculturally established instruments such as tools and language.Vygotsky, L. S. (1978) Mind in Society: The development of higher http://www.phillwebb.netpsychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press
    • Social Learning We can usecomputers to extend Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 the capabilities ofour own minds. They can become the repositories of our knowledge. http://www.phillwebb.net Computers as mind tools
    • Connectivism We live in a techno-social world Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2010 Learning occurs inside and outside of people – we store our knowledge in computers and in other people – George SiemensSource: George Siemens www.connectivism.ca/ http://www.sciencedaily.com
    • Since we cannot experience everything, otherpeople’s experiences, and hence other people, become the surrogate for knowledge. Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2010 ‘I store my knowledge in my friends’ is an axiom for collecting knowledge through collecting people. - Karen Stephenson http://bradley.chattablogs.com
    • http://socialenterpriseambassadors.org.uk Creativity ReflectionEvaluation Collaboration Critical thinking Learning to learn Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011
    • Web 1.0: Anything can link to anything Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011Source: Sabin-Corneliu Buraga www.localseoguide.com
    • The eXtended Web Web 3.0 Web x.0 Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011Degree of Information Connectivity Semantic Web Meta Web Connects knowledge Connects intelligence Web 1.0 Web 2.0 The Web Social Web Connects information Connects people Degree of Social Connectivity
    • We are already seeing early evidence of the Smart eXtended Web Steve Wheeler, University of Plymouth, 2011 Intelligent Filtering Recommender systems http://chemistscorner.com
    • From Personal Learning Environment Building to Professional Learning Network Forming Malinka Ivanova, Technical University – Sofia, BulgariaThe 5th International Scientific ConferenceeLSE - eLearning and Software for Education,BUCHAREST, April 09-10, 2009
    • Social-oriented applications and professional networks - new opportunities for learners and educatorsSocial Networks Social network sites can be defined as web-based services that allow individuals to: (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system. Danah Boyd, School of Information, University of California-Berkeley Nicole Ellison, Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media, Michigan State University
    • Social-oriented applications and professional networks - new opportunities for learners and educatorsProfessional Networks Professional network generally refers to a professional network service, a virtual community that it is focused on professional interactions instead of social interactions. Wikipedia
    • Social-oriented applications and professional networks - new opportunities for learners and educatorsSpecial-formed learning networksfor life-long learners A learning network is a group of persons who create, share, support and study learning resources (“units of learning”) in a specific knowledge domain. Rob Koper, Open University of the Netherlands
    • Social-oriented applications and professional networks - new opportunities for learners and educatorsSpecial-formed learning networksfor life-long learners
    • Social-oriented applications and professional networks - new opportunities for learners and educatorsBecause of their possibilities for: data, information and “knowledge fusion” enhancing accessibility, productivity and innovative solutions research tools providing forming groups of personal and professional interests To be successful at knowledge creation, analysis and dissemination, learners need from network inter-personal and inter-group interactions
    • Building PLE on start pagesPersonal Learning Environment PLEs are systems that help learners take control of and manage their own learning. This includes providing support for learners to set their own learning goals, manage their learning; managing both content and process; communicate with others in the process of learning and thereby achieve learning goals. Wikipedia
    • Building PLE on start pagesStart pages Web 2.0 applications called “start pages” are designed to provide a personalized place on the internet where users can mashup data, information and knowledge available anywhere, anytime, including mobile login. Wikipedia
    • Forming Learning Network for Competence DevelopmentLMS, Social network, Start page Forming the learning network of the course Internet Technologies is to: (1) provide sustainable value to students, not only during the course, but also after its finishing (2) stimulate them to contribute their knowledge, insights and experiences on a continuous basis
    • - To subject IV mater Actively - To peers and involved and educators connected - To another professionals •In individual or collaborative learning III •In social and knowledge network Personal Trying activities competence engaging •In pro-actively contributing own development insights and expertise objectives •In engaging in informal knowledge exchange II •In revising/extending Interested competence development objectives • Of relationship and connections among peers I and knowledgeAware • Of own opportunity for value-created involvement Competence development lifecycle in a learning network (according Rogers)
    • Professional Network OrganizingMore of the students who are deeply involvedin the subject matter of the course and think inperspective are interested in: more professional information contact to experts and specialists they joint to groups with special interests, professional networks they receive professional network services they can discuss interests stay informed share knowledge
    • Professional Network Organizing LMS, Social network, Start page Personal Learning• Add tools/services Network • Connect to professionals• Connect to data, and experts via information, knowledge • Connect to peers, professional organizations• Create artifacts educators, family and and networks friends • Collaborate • Share thoughts, ideas, • Contribute resources, artifacts Personal Learning Professional Environment Learning Network Development of Professional Learning Network
    • Professional Network OrganizingPLE as part of Personal Learning Network and ProfessionalLearning Network Self- arrangement of network Personal services Learning Personal Environment Learning Network Receive professional network services Professional Learning Network
    • Professional Network Organizing The transition from PLE to PfLN passes through a middle step of PLN set up This process is dynamic and continuously adapted to the present students‟ interestsSome advanced students during the PLE building self-orient and arrange content, knowledge and contacts intwo different networks: personal and professional The PLE building supports students in socialization and network processes set up PLE can be presented as a core for networks expanding In some cases the boarders between PLN and PfLN are blurred, because of coincidence of personal and professional interests
    • Professional (Personal) Learning Networks Sherry Crofuthttp://conference2009.tie2.wikispaces.net/Professional+(Personal)+Learning+Networks
    • Reasons to use a social bookmarkingnetwork:•Saved bookmarks will not be deleted whencomputers are re-imaged•You can access your bookmarks from anycomputer with the Internet from anywhere•You can form a network and sharebookmarks with friends and colleagues
    • Online Learning • Has been around since 1995 or so • Really grew with the World Wide Web • Has advanced tremendously Many positive developments in the last few years worth sharing…
    • Open Source Applications• Learning Management Systems such as Moodle, Sakai, Bodington, ATutor• Development and CommunityTools such as LAMS, Connexions, ELGG, Drupal, WordPress• Supporting Software such as Firefox, Thunderbird, OpenOffice, Audacity
    • Open Educational Resources• MIT‟s OpenCourseWare project and the OpenCourseWare Consortium• Open University‟s Open Courses• OER initiatives Hewlett, Wellcome, OECD, UNESCO• Creative Commons and CC materials in Flickr, Yahoo, Google, Wikipedia, Wikiversity, etc.
    • New Environments• Multimedia explosion podcasts, vodcasts, YouTube, Slideshare, more• Mobile computing mobile phones, PDAs, etc.• The 3D web Second Life is a start, we will see more of this
    • Access…• One-to-one computing such as the Maine laptop project, now spreading rapidly• One Laptop per Child has launched – computers in Nigeria• Wireless access 3G networks, WLAN…
    • The Concept…• Learning is centered around the interests of the learner• This learning is immersive – learning by doing• The computer connects the student to the rest of the world
    • Social Networking in eLearningWhat you will learn today: Understand how social networking is impacting society See examples of common social networking applications Have an opportunity to try social networking applications See resources and data regarding how social networking can be used within eLearning
    • Social Networking in eLearning
    • Social Networking in eLearning• Boyd and Ellison (2007) define social networks as “…web-based services that allow individuals to…. 1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system 2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection 3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system. The nature and nomenclature of these connections may vary from site to site.”
    • Social Networking in eLearningThe first officially recognized social networkwas sixdegrees.com that launched in 1997 andofficially shut down in 2000. According to theWharton School of Business, as of October2008 social networks impacted more than 230million people worldwide.
    • Social Networking in eLearningSocial Networking Factoids (Nielson Netratings) • Social networks now represent the fastest growing Internet segment – 3x the rate of overall Internet growth. (2009) • Social networking sites are growing at the rate of 47% annually, reaching 45% of total web users. (2006) • Social networking and blogging are now the 4th most popular online activities, according to Nielsen‟s recently released Global Faces and Networked Places report. (2009)
    • Social Networking in eLearning Social Networking Factoids (Nielson Netratings)• 67% of the global online population now visit a social network site, and this sector accounts for 10% of all Internet time. (Germany, Switzerland, Great Britain, and Italy are the fastest growing segments.)• Social networks and blogs are now the 4th most popular online category – ahead of personal Email• Member sites now account for 1 in every 11 minutes online
    • Social Networking in eLearning Social Networking Factoids (Nielson Netratings)Orkut.com in Brazil (operated by Google) has the largestdomestic online reach (70%) of any social networkanywhere in the world, whereas Facebook has the highestaverage time per visitor among the 75 most popularbrands online worldwide. However, the amount of timespent on Facebook.com increased by more than 566% inonly one year. (Nielsen, 2009)
    • Social Networking in eLearning According to the web site Social Media Defined (http://www.socialmediadefined.com), Twitter is a microbloggingapplication that is more or less a combination of instant messaging and blogging.
    • Social Networking in eLearning in Academia• Back-channel chat where participants at conferences provide bursts of feedback regarding conference proceedings to both other conference participants, and to people who cannot attend the conference (Hargadon, 2009); or preceding a conference via keywords (Parry, 2008). Use Twitter during a webinar to post specific keywords denoted by a hash (#facebook), and then participants search on those keyword to see what other people in the webinar (at other locations) were saying about the topic. (Mullings, 2009)
    • Social Networking in eLearning in Academia• Class chatter that allows students to continue discussion topics outside the classroom (Parry, 2008)• Follow professionals who are actively engaged in particular topics or events. For example, students can follow any number of correspondents at MSNBC, CNN, and other news outlets• Writing assignments where students build on each other‟s tweets to generate a story, poem, or haiku. (Parry, 2008)• Collaboration with students from other countries regarding specific topics of political or historical significance
    • Social Networking in eLearning in Academia• Use Twitter to “track” a word. This will subscribe you to any post that contains said word. So, for example, a student may be interested in how a particular word is used. They can track the word and see the varied phrases in which people use it. Or, they can track an event, a proper name, or a movie title. (Send the message “track ______” to Twitter) (Parry, 2008)• Storytelling - George Mayo, an eighth grade English teacher, recently used Twitter as a tool to collaboratively write a story with his students. Mayo invited his students and students around the world via his Many Voices Twitter account to add to an ongoing story with individual "tweets." After six weeks and the help of more than 100 students and six different countries, the story was finished. (Parry, 2008)
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaUse twitterfall.com Use twittervision.com• Type in a keyword and watch • Twittervision and Twittervisionthe results in real time 3D allow you to GeoTag users and their posts to know where certain topics are being discussed http://twittervision.com/maps/show_3d
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaUse Freshlogic Atlas Use historicaltweets• Type in a keyword and watch • Learn what it may have beenthe results in real time like for historical figures to tweet
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaUse tweetdeck Use YouTube or twiddeo• Create “groups” of students • Link to video files from Twitter
    • Social Networking in eLearning
    • Social Networking in eLearning Facebook is a social networking website that wasoriginally designed for college students, but is now opento anyone 13 years of age or older. Facebook users cancreate and customize their own profiles with photos,videos, and information about themselves. Friends canbrowse the profiles of other friends and write messageson their pages. (TechTerms.com)
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaUse academia.edu Use Facebook Groups• A facebook-like application • Create a class-centric group
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaResearch Academics• Analysis of how social networks • Journalismare formed http://snipr.com/j5d2m http://snipr.com/j5di5
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaAcademic Networking •http://www.facebook.com/pages/ww wdonquijoteorg/27485153678?ref=ts/• Create a networkedblog •http://www.inigral.com/products/sch ools.htm •http://www.inigral.com/products/stan dardissimo.php •http://www.facebook.com/group.php ?gid=18977111129 •http://phoenix.facebook.com/group.p hp?gid=12471635541 http://www.networkedblogs.com •http://usask.facebook.com/group.ph p?gid=12256460391
    • Social Networking in eLearningA blog (an abridgment of the term „web log’) is awebsite, usually maintained by an individual, withregular entries of commentary, descriptions ofevents, or other material such as graphics or video.Entries are commonly displayed in reversechronological order. "Blog" can also be used as averb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog. Co-Winner, Word-of-the-Year: 2004
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaWordpress.com (no fee; hosted option)Wordpress.org (free software; non-hosted) Variety of fee-based hosts that support Wordpress Hostican Laughing Squid BluehostMu.wordpress.org (Fee-based; multi-user; multi-host)
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaFrom http://onlinedegreetalk.org/blogs/• The instructor posts various announcements, information, assignments, and abbreviated lessons for student reference• More aptly called an interactive medium of study, students get an opportunity to express their opinions about a particular topic or subject posted for discussion over the net• Articles on various topics provide extensive knowledge on the subject. Students, in turn, post their comments on these articles• Used as a writing portfolio, blogs are found to be very helpful in expressing thoughts by students about their subject of study
    • Social Networking in eLearning in Academia• Students find it very useful to post comments, throw questions to their instructor about the course and the subjects in particular and talk to fellow students about course progress and related benefits• Activities and presentations pertaining to a particular subject can be discussed over the net by way of blog posts• Students get to know each other, by not just chatting, but instead by responding to the posts offered by various students• As a means of evaluation, assignments are cross verified and the qualities of presentations are evaluated by fellow students positively by way of blog posts and related responses
    • Social Networking in eLearning in AcademiaWordpress Plugins (5,000+) Scholarly Citations•Twitter Tools•Wordbook•Daiko‟s Video Widget•Flickr plugin http://snipr.com/j5rqk
    • Social Networking in eLearningA wiki is a website that uses wiki software, allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites and to power community websites (Wikipedia)
    • Steve Wheeler, Plymouth University, 2012Where are we now? http://photos.jeremybrooks.net/?p=65