Race For Africa
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Race For Africa

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    Race For Africa Race For Africa Presentation Transcript

    • Colonies Dr G.D.Brindle www.SchoolHistory.co.uk
    • Although this happened in several areas of the world, the most dramatic changes took place in Africa. Many nations took part in what became known as the “Scramble for Africa”. The following pages will show the territory gained by each nation, and will explain why the race to gain colonies played a part in the build-up of international tensions which eventually resulted in World War One. One of the major reasons for bad relations amongst the nations of Europe in the years before 1914 was that they were engaged in a struggle to obtain overseas colonies.
    • This map shows Africa in 1914 and shows how much land the major nations had taken over. There is so much detail that it is a little difficult to see exactly what has happened. To get a better idea of how much of Africa was controlled by each European power, click on any of the links below. BRITAIN FRANCE GERMANY ITALY BELGIUM NEXT PAGE
    • British Colonies Britain had managed to get some of the most valuable land in Africa. The most important gain was Egypt because of the Suez Canal. This provided a much quicker and safer route to India – the “Jewel in the Crown” of the British Empire. EGYPT SUDAN SOUTH AFRICA BECHUANALAND RHODESIA NIGERIA BRITISH EAST AFRICA
    • French Colonies MADAGASCAR FRENCH WEST AFRICA ALGERIA MOROCCO TUNIS FRENCH EQUATORIAL AFRICA France had also built up a large colonial empire, mostly in the north west of Africa. This had caused problems and there had been serious arguments over colonies such as Morocco and Tunis. Arguments over colonies caused bad feeling between Britain and France.
    • German Colonies KAMERUN GERMAN EAST AFRICA GERMAN SOUTH WEST AFRICA Germany did not enter the race for colonies until very late and, as a result, much of the land gained was not very valuable. Despite this, Kaiser William II was determined that Germany should have a major empire.
    • Italian Colonies LYBIA ITALIAN SOMALILAND ERITREA TUNIS ABYSSINIA Italy did gain a few colonies but also had its failures. It tried to take over Tunis but was beaten to it by France. It tried to take over Abyssinia but failed.
    • Belgian Colonies Even tiny Belgium had an African colony – the Belgian Congo. This was one of the reasons that Kaiser William II of Germany decided that his country must also have colonies. BELGIAN CONGO
    • Colonial Disputes During the late 1800s, relations between Britain and France were strained by a series of disputes over African colonies. Both nations hoped to control Egypt and Morocco and this caused many bitter arguments. These were eventually settled in 1904 by the Entente Cordiale. This “friendly understanding” said that Britain should control Egypt and France should control Morocco. However, Germany strongly objected to this agreement…
    • Colonial Disputes (2) Kaiser William II was jealous of the empires of both France and Britain and tried to break up the “friendly understanding” between them. On two occasions, in 1905 and 1911, German claims over Morocco raised international tension. Indeed, the “Agadir Incident” of 1911 caused Britain to hint that war might result if Germany continued her claims. This crisis passed, but these disputes simply made international relations worse. The bad feeling they created (combined with other factors) made the possibility of war more likely.