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Discovering maps
 

Discovering maps

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  • It's said that Columbus used this map or one like it to persuade Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile to support him in the early 1490s. The map was made by a German cartographer living in Florence and reflects the latest theories about the form of the world and the most accurate ways of portraying it on a flat surface. It seemed to prove that, as Columbus argued, there wasn't a great distance between Europe and China by sea. The map is also the first to record the rounding of the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa by the Portuguese in 1488. This proved that there wasn't a land link to Asia in the south - and that Europeans could reach the riches of the East Indies by sea without having to go through Muslim-held lands
  • Made for the Chinese Emperor, this is the earliest known Chinese terrestrial globe, and a fusion of East and Western cultures. Its creators are thought to be the Jesuit missionaries , who introduced the telescope to China,. T he globe's depiction of the coasts of Africa and Europe would have contrasted with traditional Chinese maps. These exaggerated the size of China and placed it in the middle of a world that otherwise consisted mainly of small offshore islands. In its treatment of eclipses and meridians and its information about magnetic inclination, however, the globe draws on ideas that were developed in China far earlier than in the West.
  • 'America' is named and envisaged as a separate continent for the first time on this map The map itself was created by a skilled cartographer, Martin Waldseemüller, and was accompanied by an explanatory booklet by one Matthias Ringmann. Impressed by the writings of Florentine navigator Amerigo Vespucci, Ringmann suggested that the Americas weren't part of Asia, as Columbus thought, but a continent in their own right. So they should, like the other continents, have a female name - hence America, after Vespucci's first name. Perhaps to emphasise the independent existence of the Americas, the map shows what we now know is the Pacific lapping the western coast of South America, though its existence was only confirmed years later. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1272921/Ten-greatest-maps-changed-world.html#ixzz0uY0PT3Is
  • It's impossible to portray the reality of the spherical world on a flat map. The familiar 'Mercator' projection gives the right shapes of land masses (up to a point), but at the cost of distorting their sizes in favour of the wealthy lands to the north. The German Arno Peters sought to correct this. His projection gets the proportions (roughly) right, and has the effect of emphasising the Third World. That said, it's no more 'true' than the 'colonialist' projection it seeks to replace Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1272921/Ten-greatest-maps-changed-world.html#ixzz0uY1kT5SW
  • Google Earth presents a world in which the area of most concern to you (in this instance, Avebury in Wiltshire) can be at the centre, and which - with mapped content overlaid - can contain whatever you think is important. Almost for the first time, the ability to create an accurate map has been placed in the hands of everyone, and it has transformed the way we view the world. But it comes at a price. There are few, if any, agreed standards about what should be included, and the less populated and 'less important' regions get ignored. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1272921/Ten-greatest-maps-changed-world.html#ixzz0uY0pI6NQ

Discovering maps Discovering maps Presentation Transcript

  • http://inapcache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/apollo_07_15/a01_11446548.jpg
  • Maps It Is All About... Who Draws The Maps
  • Maps That Have Changed The World http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1272921/Ten-greatest-maps-changed-world.html
  • http-_ www.mlahanas.de _Greeks_images_PtolemyMapLarge.jpg HENRICUS MARTELLUS WORLD MAP, c1490
  • http://www-tc.pbs.org/newshour/indepth_coverage/middle_east/slideshow_jerusalem/media/map.jpg 1581 - Where is the Center of the World?
  • CHINESE GLOBE, 1623
  • WALDSEEMULLER WORLD MAP, 1507
  • PETERS PROJECTION WORLD MAP, 1974
  • GOOGLE EARTH, c2005
  • Extending The Conversation
  • Locations on a Map
    • A brief rundown of the major regions....
    • The following are usually the most problematic for American students...
    Label your maps with the broad general area titles
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  • Locations on a Map
    • Can you identify the following google images?
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  • Use the second world map to identify regions you need to study- create a study guide around the map
  • You will want to know the location of the following: Persian Gulf Cuba United Kingdom Panama Argentina Mediterranean Sea Red Sea Israel Germany France Canada Egypt Republic of South Africa China Japan Iran Russia Spain Turkey Philippines Afghanistan Saudi Arabia Pakistan India Australia Mexico US Iraq
  • Use the mini maps for a more detailed specification of empires