Affective principles por Monica Saenz

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Affective principles por Monica Saenz

  1. 1. UNIVERSIDAD CENTRAL DEL ECUADORFACULTAD DE FILOSOFIA, LETRAS YCIENCIAS DE LA EDUCACIONPlurilingueQuito semestreMonica Saenz
  2. 2. FUNDAMENTAL PURPOSES OFLANGUAGE LEARNINGAFFECTIVE PRINCIPLES
  3. 3. LANGUAGE EGO
  4. 4.  Affective issues among learners of an L2 play a verysignificant role in determining the success of the learner,whether they be a child, a teen, or an adult.
  5. 5.  Even linguists, who might be pretty familiar already withall of the ways that languages behave, might still beeffected by the emotions that crop up as part of languageacquisition.
  6. 6. WHAT IS IT? The language ego can describe a kind of identity onedevelops based on the language one speaks.
  7. 7. DEFENSIVENESSFRAGILITYRISINGINHIBITIONS
  8. 8.  Child is still in the process.Adult is more planted
  9. 9. WHILE TEACHING A SECOND LANGUAGE THETEACHER SHOULD TAKE THE FOLLOWING INTOCONSIDERATION: When students should be corrected How planned and structured should the activity be How much should be explained, and how should thestudent be treated
  10. 10. PRAISE STUDENTS
  11. 11. NOT BE AFRAID
  12. 12. NEITHER TOO EASY NOR TOO DIFFICULT.
  13. 13. SELF-CONFIDENCE“I can do it!” principle orself-esteem principle
  14. 14. DEFINITION It is a personal judgment of worthiness that is expressedin the attitudes that individuals hold toward themselves
  15. 15. WHAT DOES IT MEAN? Learners belief that they indeed are fully capable ofaccomplishing a task is at least partially a factor intheir eventual success in attaining the task.
  16. 16. PEOPLE DERIVE THEIR SELF-ESTEEM FROM: Accumulation of experiences
  17. 17.  Assessments of the external world around them
  18. 18. THREE GENERAL LEVELS OF SELF-ESTEEM General or global self-steam Situational or specific self-steam Task self-esteemAll three levels of self-esteem correlated positively withperformance on the oral production measure
  19. 19. GENERAL OR GLOBAL SELF-STEAM Stable in a mature adult. It is the general or prevailing assessment onemakes of one’s own worth over time and across anumber of situations
  20. 20. SITUATIONAL OR SPECIFIC SELF-STEAM One’s self-appraisals in particular live situations or oncertainly relatively discretely defined traits. Might encompass second language acquisition in general
  21. 21. TASK SELF-ESTEEM Relates to particular task within specific situations Might appropriately refer to one’s self-evaluation ofa particular aspect of the process.
  22. 22.  Self-esteem appeared to be an important variable insecond language acquisition, particular in view of cross-cultural factors of second language learning.
  23. 23. COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE FACTORS Motivation Personality Intergroup climate Two levels of self-confidence
  24. 24.  Does high self-esteem cause language success, ordoes language success cause high self-esteem?
  25. 25. IMMEDIATE CLASSROOM APPLICATIONS Give ample verbal and nonverbal assurance tostudents Sequence techniques from easier to more difficultIt sustains self-confidence where italready exist and build it where it doesn’t.Students then can establish a sense ofaccomplishment that catapults them tothe next more difficult step.
  26. 26.  Create situations where students cannot fail. Set realistic expectations. Work to build studentself-esteem on a daily basis. Keep things interesting. Little changes in dailyroutines can make classroom activities more fun. Make positive statements instead of negative ones.Find ways to give criticism in a positive manner.HOW CAN YOU BUILD SELF-ESTEEM IN YOURSTUDENTS?
  27. 27.  Build on successes whether they are large or small.No matter the size, celebrate success as it happens. Maintain a record of successful activities. Take self-esteem lessons outside the classroom andinto the home. Encourageparents, grandparents, caregivers and guardians tocontinue the same strategies while the child is withthem.
  28. 28.  Chain of Talents Compliments Drawing your self Making a commercial My Best ReinforcementACTIVITIES WE CAN USE TO INCREASE SELF-ESTEEM
  29. 29. RISKS-TAKING
  30. 30. Taking risks and experimenting beyond what is certaincreates better long-term retention.
  31. 31.  Learners have to try out their hunches about thelanguage and take risks of being wrong.
  32. 32. SOME OF THE NEGATIVE PROBLEMS THAT FOSTERFEAR OF RISK-TAKING BOTH IN THE CLASSROOMAND IN NATURAL ENVIRONMENT.
  33. 33. IN THE CLASSROOM
  34. 34. It might include a bad grade in the course.
  35. 35. A reproach from the teacher.
  36. 36. A smirk from a classmate.
  37. 37. OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
  38. 38. They fear looking ridiculous.
  39. 39. They fear the frustration coming from a listener’s look.
  40. 40. They fear the alienation of not being able to communicateand thereby get close to other human beings.
  41. 41. HOW TO SOLVE IT ?
  42. 42. To establish an adequate affective framework.
  43. 43. To create a climate of acceptance that will stimulate self-confidence.
  44. 44. Risk-taking variation seems to be a factor in a number ofissues in second language acquisition and pedagogy.
  45. 45. The silent student in the classroom is one who is unwillingto appear foolish when mistakes are made.
  46. 46. A person with high global self-esteem is not daunted by thepossible consequences of being laughed at.
  47. 47. Our problem as teachers will be to encourage students
  48. 48. CULTURE AND LANGUAGE CONNECTIONPrinciple:Second Language
  49. 49. COMPLEX INTERCONNECTION OF LANGUAGEAND CULTURE
  50. 50. Keeping voice down in public// Speaking aloudbargaining with street vendorsslangBeing respectfulBeing on timeShowing affection in publicto bow /shaking hands when meet someonenot to tipto point with your hand at peoplenot kissing in public
  51. 51. CLASSROOM APPLICATIONS INCLUDE THEFOLLOWING: Cross-cultural DifferencesNo Culture is "better" than another Techniques activities/materialsconnection Language -- Culture Cultural Connotationssociolinguistic aspects, of language 4 culturally OffensiveSpeakingStoriescharts
  52. 52. CULTURAL CONNOTATIONSDepending on the context, the connotation of a word choice canchange the meaning of a sentence considerably.Childlike, Youthful, Childish, Young *someone is immature.Talkative, Conversational, Chatty, Nosy *someone asks too manyquestions.The word "snake" simple denotes a reptile. *someone who cannot be trusted.“ Chapa” policeman“lana” ; “cusqui” ; “plata” …………………………?guagua, pelado, chamo …………………………?
  53. 53. 4 culturally OffensiveMerienda de negros
  54. 54. 2ND ASPECT LCCAcculturation is a process in which membersof one cultural group adopt the beliefs andbehaviors of another group.Although acculturation is usually in thedirection of a minority group adoptinghabits and language patterns of thedominant group, acculturation can bereciprocal--that is, the dominant group alsoadopts patterns typical of the minoritygroup.SpanglishOKByeChachaiAtatai
  55. 55. In many second language learningcontexts, students are faced with therealities of adapting to life in a foreigncountry.Especially in “second ”languagelearning contexts, the success withwich learners adapt to a new culturalmilieu will affect their languageacquisition success, and viceversa, insome possibly significant waysMilieu-entorno, medioclose,kleuzclothes,kleuezbird,beard
  56. 56. CLASSROOMHOW TO HELP BOYS?1. Help students to be aware ofacculturation and its stages2. Stress the importance of thesecond language as apowerful tool for adjustment inthe new culture.3. Be, especially sensitive to anystudents who appear to bediscouraged, then do whatyou can to assist them.Aware-concienteDiscouraged-desanimadoHolidaysTheir livesAbout yourcountryMilkBathroomTo eat
  57. 57. HOW TO HELP BOYS?
  58. 58. QUESTIONS??? Whenever you teach a language, What also youteach? Write 5 words of cultural connotations? What is Acculturation ? Why is important like a second language "Cultureand Language Connection"?
  59. 59. DIFFERENTS PROBLEMS THAT HAVE THE STUDENT Think about the health and welfare of your childAs a first step, consider factors such as physical health, emotional problems orany other challenge you are facing. For example, learning disabilities sometimesmay be the result of:Problems with vision, hearing or healthSleeplessnessAnxiety or excessive worryStressful situations at school, and peer bullying (in Englishbullying)Stressful family situations such as serious illness, death or divorceIf your child has not had a physical examination recently, would be a good idea to makean appointmentfor a complete checkup to rule out any health problems. For those who are learning English, learn it while they are studying academiccontent, such as science or social studies, represents a very difficult mental work,so it is not unusual that sometimes have difficulty in learning these subjects.
  60. 60. THERE ARE THREE TYPES OF CONDITIONS THAT CANLEAD TO ENGLISH LEARNERS WITH LEARNINGDIFFICULTIESType 1: Learning difficulties resulting from the learning environment. byexample, English language learners may not have access to effectiveeducationof that language. Or maybe teaching in the classroom for granted certainlife experiencesor cultural knowledge that students do not have.Type 2: A learning disability that can be solved in the classroom ifidentified immediately and the student teaching when the student getsnot get immediate help, the learning problem can get worse andconfused with a learning disability (see type 3 below).Type 3: A learning disability is not caused by the environmentlearning. Perhaps your child has a learning disability (LD) that makes it hardunderstand, remember and use the knowledge and skills that are taught.
  61. 61. Teaching by PrinciplesChpter 4Pag 64-65http://www.ingles.co.cr/noticias/estrategias_tecnicas_estudiantes_exitosos.html

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