11/10/12	   TEACHING WITH COMPLEX TEXT  GREENWICH PUBLIC SCHOOLS     LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE        AUGUST 2012            CR...
11/10/12	  OBJECTIVESAugust 15, 2012 (Part 1)§  Provide ADMINISTRATORS with EXPERIENCE & MATERIALS to “turnkey” workshops...
11/10/12	           IS THIS REALLY A CRISIS?§  Vocabulary demands have declined, e.g., 8th grade textbooks = former 5th g...
11/10/12	  CCSS INSTRUCTIONAL SHIFTS §  Building knowledge through content-rich     nonfiction and informational texts §...
11/10/12	  WHAT DOES “EXPOSED” TO GRADE LEVELTEXT COMPLEXITY MEAN ?§  Interactive Read - Alouds§  Independent Reading (9...
11/10/12	                                          Fisher & Frey ACTIVITY C:                                 PDF FISHER & ...
11/10/12	  TEXT COMPLEXITY MODEL "   Text complexity is defined by:       1.  Quantitative measures – readability and     ...
11/10/12	  TEXT COMPLEXITY MODEL  "    Text complexity is defined by:      3. Reader and Task considerations – background ...
11/10/12	  With the End in Mind…Recommended Placement§  Fill in blank PLACEMAT graphic organizer as we  go…§  GOAL: Afte...
11/10/12	   STEP #1: QUANTITATIVE MEASURES    §  Sentence and word length    §  Frequency of unfamiliar words    §  Wor...
11/10/12	  TEXT COMPLEXITY CORRELATION CHART FORCOMMON GPS SCALES                                                        2...
11/10/12	  STEP #1: IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATORS  General Rule:  § Use any one of the quantitative     analyzer tools to pl...
11/10/12	  STEP 1: QUANTITATIVE MEASURES§  Remember, however, that the quantitative  measure is only the first of three “...
11/10/12	    STEP #2: QUALITATIVE MEASURES       A.  Levels of meaning or purpose       B.  Structure       C. Language co...
11/10/12	  STEP 2: QUALITATIVE MEASURES§  Because factors for literary texts are different  from informational texts, the...
11/10/12	                      x                    x                    x                    x                           ...
11/10/12	  STEP 2: QUALITATIVE MEASURESPROCESS:1.  Our initial placement of Salvador, Late or Early    into a text complex...
11/10/12	  STEP #3: READER AND TASKConsiderations such as:  •  Motivation, knowledge and experience  •  Purpose for readin...
11/10/12	  STEP 3: READER AND TASK                      §  The questions included                        here are largely...
11/10/12	   Final Step: Recommended Placement §  After reflecting upon all three legs of the text   complexity model, we ...
11/10/12	  IMPLICATIONS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING§  Based on levels of complexity, current instructional materials will n...
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Text complexityces.gps.part1pdf.2

  1. 1. 11/10/12   TEACHING WITH COMPLEX TEXT GREENWICH PUBLIC SCHOOLS LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE AUGUST 2012 CREATED BY JEN MITCHELL PRESENTED BY JEN MITCHELL & KIM BECK 1 PART I.DETERMINING TEXT COMPLEXITY AUGUST 15, 2012 2 1  
  2. 2. 11/10/12  OBJECTIVESAugust 15, 2012 (Part 1)§  Provide ADMINISTRATORS with EXPERIENCE & MATERIALS to “turnkey” workshops and informations in your buildings.§  Understand the three part model of text complexity and the final step of placing texts in grade bands.Future Leadership Meeting (Part 2)§  Apply close reading strategies to scaffold complex text. 3 THE “CRISIS” OF TEXT COMPLEXITY§ Complexity of texts students are expected to read is way below what is required to achieve college and career readiness: §  High school textbooks have declined in all subject areas over several decades §  Average length of sentences in K-8 textbooks has declined from 20 to 14 words Council of Chief State School Officers: Text Complexity 4 2  
  3. 3. 11/10/12   IS THIS REALLY A CRISIS?§  Vocabulary demands have declined, e.g., 8th grade textbooks = former 5th grade texts; 12th grade anthologies = former 7th grade texts§  Too many students are reading at too low a level (<50% of graduates can read sufficiently complex texts) CCSSO Text Complexity5 ACT, INC., “READING BETWEEN THE LINES REPORT” (2006)§  The most important implication of the study: “What students could read, in terms of its complexity, was at least as important as what they could do with what they read.” 6 CCSS Appendix A. p. 2 3  
  4. 4. 11/10/12  CCSS INSTRUCTIONAL SHIFTS §  Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational texts §  Reading and writing grounded in evidence from text §  Regular practice and instruction with complex texts and its academic vocabulary 7CCSS INSTRUCTIONAL SHIFTS§  All students must be exposed to grade level text complexity regardless of their reading ability 8 CCSS, Appendix A 4  
  5. 5. 11/10/12  WHAT DOES “EXPOSED” TO GRADE LEVELTEXT COMPLEXITY MEAN ?§  Interactive Read - Alouds§  Independent Reading (95% accuracy & comprehension)§  Shared Reading §  Close Reading of a passage §  Multiple exposures §  Reading for different purposes§  Reading for extended periods of time across content-areas 9 THREE-PART MODEL FOR MEASURING TEXT COMPLEXITY Three Ways to Build Background Knowledge: *Choose ONE or More… A. Jigsaw – Hiebert Article B.  Video with Graphic Organizer to Generate Discussion C. Jigsaw – Fisher & Frey Article 10 5  
  6. 6. 11/10/12   Fisher & Frey ACTIVITY C: PDF FISHER & FREY ARTICLE JIGSAW (15 MINUTES) (DISTRIBUTE)Count off by “fours” and find your “like” numbers to form a“group”; you can sub-divide if groups still too large!§  All – Introduction (p. 2 to top of p. 3)§  Group 1 – Quantitative (p. 3)§  Group 2 – Qualitative (pgs. 3 – 4)§  Group 3 – The Reader (pgs. 4 – 7)§  Group 4 – The Task (pgs. 7 – 8)§  All – If time, Skim Conclusions and Appendixes (p.11…)In your “Like Number Group” discuss your section and in nomore than 2-3 sentences, summarize your section. 1 personwill report their summarization to the larger group 11 THREE-PART MODEL 1-2-3 FOR MEASURING TEXT COMPLEXITY 12 6  
  7. 7. 11/10/12  TEXT COMPLEXITY MODEL " Text complexity is defined by: 1.  Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. 13 Kansas Department of EducationTEXT COMPLEXITY MODEL " Text complexity is defined by: 2.  Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. 14 Kansas Department of Education 7  
  8. 8. 11/10/12  TEXT COMPLEXITY MODEL " Text complexity is defined by: 3. Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment. 15 Kansas Department of Education THREE-PART MODEL FOR MEASURING TEXT COMPLEXITYDetermining Text Complexity ofSalvador, Late or Early-Cisneros, S. (1992). Woman Hollering Creek. New York: Vintage-distribute short text 16 8  
  9. 9. 11/10/12  With the End in Mind…Recommended Placement§  Fill in blank PLACEMAT graphic organizer as we go…§  GOAL: After reflecting upon all three legs of the text complexity model educators can make a final recommendation of placement of a text in particular grade-band. Then we begin to document our thinking for future reference. Hand 17 out 3 A CLOSER LOOK QUANTITATIVE MEASURES 18 9  
  10. 10. 11/10/12   STEP #1: QUANTITATIVE MEASURES §  Sentence and word length §  Frequency of unfamiliar words §  Word frequency §  Number of syllables in words 19PROPOSED COMMON CORE SCALE BANDSCommonCore Bands: Text Analyzer Tools DRP FK Lexile2nd - 3rd 42 - 54 1.98 - 5.34 420 - 8204th – 5th 52 - 60 4.51 - 7.73 740 - 10106th – 8th 57 - 67 6.51 – 10.34 925 - 11859th – 10th 62 - 72 8.32 – 12.12 1050 - 133511th - CCR 67 - 74 10.34 – 14.2 1185 - 1385 20 10  
  11. 11. 11/10/12  TEXT COMPLEXITY CORRELATION CHART FORCOMMON GPS SCALES 21STEP #1: QUANTITATIVE MEASURES LET’S TRY IT OUT!!! Consider: §  Sentence and word length §  Frequency of unfamiliar words §  Word frequency §  Number of syllables in words Salvador, Late or Early (S. Cisneros) §  Sentence length and vocabulary/word frequency §  Reread Paragraph 1; consider sentence length! §  Vocabulary/Word Frequency §  Name of main character appears frequently §  Challenging vocabulary words…identify… §  vague §  nub §  Scuttles §  Lexile= 960 §  F & P = Z 22 11  
  12. 12. 11/10/12  STEP #1: IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATORS General Rule: § Use any one of the quantitative analyzer tools to place text into a complexity band level. § In which of the text complexity bands would Salvador, Late or Early fall? 23STEP #1: COMMON CORE SCALE BANDS FORSALVADOR, LATE OR EARLYCommonCore Bands: Text Analyzer Tools DRP FK Lexile2nd - 3rd 42 - 54 1.98 - 5.34 420 - 8204th – 5th 52 - 60 4.51 - 7.73 740 - 10106th – 8th 57 - 67 6.51 – 10.34 925 - 11859th – 10th 62 - 72 8.32 – 12.12 1050 - 133511th - CCR 67 - 74 10.34 – 14.2 1185 - 1385 24 12  
  13. 13. 11/10/12  STEP 1: QUANTITATIVE MEASURES§  Remember, however, that the quantitative measure is only the first of three “legs” of the text complexity model.§  Our final recommendation may be validated, influenced, or even over-ruled by our examination of qualitative measures and the reader and task considerations.§  Fill out the QUANTITATIVE MEASURE portion of the PLACEMAT- Handout #3. 25 Kansas State Department of Education A CLOSER LOOK QUALITATIVE MEASURES 26 13  
  14. 14. 11/10/12   STEP #2: QUALITATIVE MEASURES A.  Levels of meaning or purpose B.  Structure C. Language conventionality and clarity D.  Knowledge demands 27 Elfrieda H. Hiebert – The Common Core State Standards and Text Complexity STEP 2: QUALITATIVE MEASURESThe Qualitative Measures Rubricsfor Literary and Informational Text§  These rubrics allow educators to evaluate the important elements of text that are often missed by computer software that tends to focus on more easily measured factors. Handouts 4 & 5 28Kansas State Department of Education 14  
  15. 15. 11/10/12  STEP 2: QUALITATIVE MEASURES§  Because factors for literary texts are different from informational texts, these two rubrics contain different content. However, the formatting of each document is exactly the same.§  Since these factors represent continua rather than discrete stages or levels, numeric values are not associated with these rubrics. Instead, four points along each continuum are identified: high, middle high, middle low, and low.§  Pull out LITERARY rubric – Handout #5 29 Kansas State Department of EducationSTEP 2: QUALITATIVE MEASURES§  So…LET’S TRY IT OUT! How is the rubric used?§  Read the descriptive factors. How would Salvador, Late or Early rate when analyzed through the lens of the Literary Text Rubric?§  Work together to discuss and MARK the rubric accordingly. 30 15  
  16. 16. 11/10/12   x x x x x x x x 31STEP 2: QUALITATIVE MEASURESSalvadore, Late or Early (S. Cisneros) Lexile Text Measure: 960L But after reflecting upon the qualitative measures, we believed: 32 16  
  17. 17. 11/10/12  STEP 2: QUALITATIVE MEASURESPROCESS:1.  Our initial placement of Salvador, Late or Early into a text complexity band changed (between 4-5 and 6-8) when we examined the qualitative measures ( to the grade 6-8 band).2.  Remember, however, we have completed only the first two legs of the text complexity model.3.  The reader and task considerations still remain.4.  Complete the section of the text complexity PLACEMAT. 33 A CLOSER LOOK READER AND TASK CONSIDERATIONS 34 17  
  18. 18. 11/10/12  STEP #3: READER AND TASKConsiderations such as: •  Motivation, knowledge and experience •  Purpose for reading •  Complexity of task assigned regarding text •  Complexity of questions asked regarding text 35STEP #3: READER AND TASKQuestions for Professional Reflectionon Reader and Task Considerations:§  The questions provided in this resource are meant to guide teacher thought and reflection upon the text, students, and any tasks associated with the text.§  Distribute Reader & Task Handout 6 Consideration Handout 36 18  
  19. 19. 11/10/12  STEP 3: READER AND TASK §  The questions included here are largely open- ended questions without single, correct answers, but help educators to think through the implications of using a particular text in the classroom. 37STEP 3: READER AND TASK§  Review Salvador, Late or Early; discuss the guiding questions on HANDOUT #6 in a small group.§  Complete the Considerations for READER and TASK section of the PLACEMAT.§  Based upon our examination of the Reader and Task Considerations, we have completed the third leg of the text complexity model and are now ready to recommend a final placement within a text complexity band. 38 19  
  20. 20. 11/10/12   Final Step: Recommended Placement §  After reflecting upon all three legs of the text complexity model, we can make a final recommendation of placement of the text in a particular grade-band. Now, begin to document our thinking for future reference. §  Complete the “Recommended Placement” section of the PLACEMAT. Handout 3 39 NEXT  STEPS  §  In grade-level teams, develop a pool of annotated texts that exemplify and help benchmark the process of evaluating text complexity, using both quantitative and qualitative measures and the professional judgment of teachers -- complex text playlists!§  The texts and the annotations accompanying them will provide educators with a deeper, more multidimensional picture of text complexity that they can use to help them select materials. 40 20  
  21. 21. 11/10/12  IMPLICATIONS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING§  Based on levels of complexity, current instructional materials will need to be supplemented, enhanced or moved to a different grade. Some of this work will be represented in the curriculum (units of study- suggested materials) and some can be done within our schools at grade-level or, course-specific, planning meetings. 41 USEFUL WEBSITES §  Connecticut State Department of Education: http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/site/default.asp §  Council of Chief State School Officers: http://www.ccsso.org/Resources/Digital_Resources/ Common_Core_Implementation_Video_Series.html §  Kansas State Department of Education: http://www.ksde.org/Default.aspx?tabid=4778#TextRes §  Lexile Analyzer: www.lexile.com/findabook §  Maine Department of Education: http://www.maine.gov/education/lres/commoncore/ §  National PTA: http://www.pta.org/common_core_state_standards.asp §  The Hunt Institute (video series): http://www.youtube.com/user/TheHuntInstitute#g/u 42 21  

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