Peanut Allergies
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  • Preview:Peanut allergies have become a growing problem in the past couple of years for teachers and principals. The reason that it is such a big problem because peanut allergies can be deadly and they affect everyone in the school. Parents have to watch what they pack in their students lunch, teachers have to watch the students and make sure they are safe, and the students have take responsibility to make smart choices. During this PowerPoint I will be discussing a variety of issues, such as, what are peanut allergies, what to do when a allergic reactions occur, the impact of peanut allergies within the schools, what can be done to prevent reactions, and finally are there any laws on peanut allergies.
  • What are Peanut Allergies:Peanut allergies mostly appear in children and the they are becoming more common every year and know no ones why. Actually, food allergies have increased 55% in the last 5 years. Whereas most children grow out of their food allergies before high school, peanut allergies are harder to grow out of. Common Symptoms of an allergic reaction are skin reactions, digestive problems, tightening of the chest, running or stuffy nose, dizziness, loss of conscience, itchiness and swelling of the mouth and throat. Exposure to peanuts occur in three different ways. The first is also the most common and that is direct contact, which is physically touching peanuts or foods with peanut oils in them. The second is cross contact, which is when the food was in contact with peanuts and then you come into contact with the food. The last way a reaction can occur is through inhalation of a peanut. Common examples would be breathing a cooking spray with peanut oils in them.
  • Are Peanut Allergies Serious:Yes. Peanut allergies are absolutely serious. They effect everyone in the schools and when isn’t child safety important? In fact, “40%-50% of those persons with diagnosed food allergy are judged to have a high risk of anaphylaxis.” Anaphylaxis is a medical term defined as a sudden, severe allergic reaction characterized by a sharp drop in blood pressureand breathing difficulties. The reaction may be fatal if emergency treatment, including epinephrine injections, is not given immediately. Also, every food allergy has the potential to develop into a life-threatening reaction and “peanut and tree nuts account for 92% of severe and fatal reactions,” which is why schools needs to take allergies serious.
  • When Allergies Attack:When a student has an allergic reaction the staff needs to be prepared. With a reaction because of peanuts occur, students needs to be injected with adrenaline or epinephrine. Most reactions require a trip to the emergency room so the student can have medical attention. Finally, schools should be prepared for anything.
  • Impact on Schools:School districts are going to have to deal with students allergies. So, schools will have to know the best way to avoid reactions and what to do when reactions occur.
  • Impact on SchoolsParents have to be aware of what their children are taking for lunch. Do their children have things such as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich? Schools also have to be conscience of what they’re serving in the cafeteria. The schools should read everything that is in the food that they are serving so they know what foods are safe for students with allergies and what foods they should avoid. Below is a link to an article in Newsweek about allergies in the Lunchroom. This article talks about the background in food allergies.
  • What Can Schools Do?Schools need to place policies to protect the needs of students. A great example of this is implementing peanut free zones where foods with peanuts are not allowed. Schools also should be equipped with emergencies supplies and all staff members need to go through a First Aid program. When a child has a reaction every teacher should know how to handle the situation. Lastly, schools should make sure that their equipment are clean. Example: washing down the tables in the lunchroom.
  • What Else Can Be Done?A couple of things schools can do included…discouragingchildren from sharing food.Parents shouldchildren a medical alert bracelet/necklace. Take the time to write out an action plan with each student.Make sure the child has their medicine. Parents should also notify KEY people that their child has a peanut allergy.Avoid foods such aspeanut butter, salad dressing, anything with peanut oil, ice cream, chocolate candies and even cultural foods such as Chinese and Mexican.
  • The Future:There is no cure for peanut allergies yet, since this allergy is relatively new. Many schools in Michigan have banned any sort of peanut and peanut oils in their schools. This is called Nut Restricted. Other schools have peanut free zones and classrooms. This is called being Nut Aware.
  • Legislation Laws:There are no laws or rules that correspond with peanut allergies. Every school handles it different, but the main thing is they handle it responsibly. Allergies also need to be a group thing. Steady communication is highly recommened.

Transcript

  • 1. By: Mitch Vercellino
    Peanut Allergies
    Author: viZZZual.com
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vizzzual-dot-com/2258190742/
  • 2. Preview
    Throughout this PowerPoint the following issues will be discussed:
    What are Peanut Allergies
    What to do when a allergic reaction occurs
    The impact of Peanut Allergies in the schools
    What can be done to prevent reactions
    Are there any laws on Peanut Allergies?
  • 3. What are Peanut Allergies?
    Appears mostly in children.
    Peanut allergies are becoming more common every year (Food allergies have increased 55% in the last 5 years)
    Common Symptoms: Skin reactions, digestive problems, tightening of chest, running or stuffy nose, dizziness, loss of conscience, itchiness and swelling of the mouth and throat.
    Exposure to peanuts can occur through direct contact, cross contact and inhalation of a peanut.
  • 4. Are Peanut Allergies Serious?
    YES! For Kids safety and well-being!
    Peanut allergies affect everyone in the school.
    “40%-50% of those persons with diagnosed food allergy are judged to have a high risk of anaphylaxis” (Driscoll)
    Every food allergy has the potential to develop into a life-threatening reaction.
    “Peanut and tree nuts account for 92% of severe and fatal reactions” (Driscoll).
  • 5. When Allergies Attack!
    Staff need to be prepared when a students has an allergic reaction.
    When a reaction happens the victim needs to be injected with adrenaline.
    If a student has an anaphylactic reaction then the student needs immediate medical attention.
    SCHOOL’S SHOULD BE PREPARED FOR ANYTHING
  • 6. Impact on Schools (Part 1)
    School districts are going to have to deal with students allergies.
    Schools will have to know the best way to avoid reactions and what to do when reactions occur.
    “1 in 5 children with food allergies will have a reaction while in school” (Driscoll 2)
  • 7. Impact on Schools (Part 2)
    Parents have to be aware of what their children are taking for lunch.
    Schools have to be conscience of what they’re serving in the cafeteria.
    Below is a link to an article in Newsweek about allergies in the Lunchroom: http://www.newsweek.com/id/62296
    Author: Bruce Tuten
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/savannahgrandfather/3110488970/
  • 8. What Can Schools Do?
    Schools need to place policies to protect the needs of students. (Ex. would be a Peanut free zone)
    Parents need to discuss their kids individual problems with the school nurses.
    Schools should be equipped with emergencies supplies.
    All staff members need to go through a First Aid program.
    Make sure the schools are clean. Example: washing down the tables in the lunchroom.
  • 9. What Else Can Be Done?
    Discourage children from sharing food.
    Give children a medical alert bracelet/necklace.
    Write out an action plan.
    Make sure the child has their medicine.
    Notify KEY people that your child has a peanut allergy.
    Avoid foods: peanut butter, salad dressing, anything with peanut oil, ice cream, chocolate candies and even cultural foods such as Chinese and Mexican.
    (Clinic 6)
    Author: John Adkins II
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/foto71/3691527422/
  • 10. The Future…
    Peanut allergies victims do not have a long effective cure yet.
    Doctors feel they are close to finding a cure and getting a complete grip on peanut allergies.
    As of right now, many schools in Michigan have actually gone as far as banning any foods with peanut oils in them. This is called being Nut Restricted.
    Other schools just have peanut free zones and classrooms. This is called being Nut Aware.
    Author: EuroMagic
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/euromagic/2351628831/
  • 11. Legislation Laws:
    There are no National or State laws enforcing rules about Peanut Allergies.
    School Districts have to be aware of their students issues and accommodate accordingly.
    Parents have to be active also. They should always communicate with the schools and be a voice in their child’s life.
  • 12. Works Cited
    Driscoll, David P. Managing Life Threatening Food Allergies in Schools. Massachusetts Department of Education, 2002.
    Kalb, Claudia. “Fear and Allergies in the Lunchroom.” Newsweek: 5 November 2007. http://www.newsweek.com/id/62296
    Mayo Clinic. Peanut Allergy. Mayo Clinic Health Manager, 2009.