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An essay on what digital strategy airports should adopt in order to improve the experience of flying

An essay on what digital strategy airports should adopt in order to improve the experience of flying

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  • 1. 

Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy
 An
essay
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 
 
 
 
 
 Source:
www.caglecartoons.com

 

  • 2. Introduction
According
 to
 Benjamin
 Franklin
 “nothing
 in
 this
 world
 is
 certain,
 except
 death
and
 taxes”.
 But
 he
 didn’t
 live
 in
 our
 century
 and
 never
 got
 to
 experience
 the
inevitable
problems
that
come
with
trying
to
board
a
plane
in
the
21st
Century.
No
one
has
ever
stated
that
they
had
a
nice
time
during
the
check‐in
process
or
that
 the
 immigration
 procedure
 was
 pleasurable,
 but
 there
 are
 hundreds
 of
thousands
 of
 complaints
 and
 stories
 that
 come
 out
 every
 day
 associated
 with
flying.
Airlines
lose
people’s
bags
or
passengers
miss
their
flight
due
to
delays
in
immigration
or
security.
It’s
safe
to
say
that
flying
is
one
of
the
most
exasperating
ways
of
travel,
far
more
so
than
taking
the
train
or
walking,
yet
there
is
simply
no
faster
way
to
cover
vast
distances.


It
all
starts
once
you
leave
the
relative
safety
of
your
house
for
the
airport:
the
first
 step
 upon
 arrival
 is
 finding
 your
 terminal.
 There
 are
 usually
 several
different
terminal’s
that
are
far
apart
and
it’s
not
always
clear
where
you
have
to
go
 in
 order
 to
 check‐in.
 Once
 you
 have
 finally
 found
 the
 long
 lines
 of
 people
booked
on
the
same
flight
as
yours
the
waiting
begins.
Yet
once
you
have
finally
gotten
to
the
counter
and
have
obtained
the
much‐valued
boarding
pass
it
is
not
over,
 no
 things
 have
 only
 started.
 Next
 is
 the
 security
 checkpoint
 where
everyone
is
forced
to
practically
undress
before
being
allowed
to
go
through
the
metal
 detector.
 This
 is
 where
 you
 see
 poor
 old
 people
 struggling
 to
 get
 their
shoes
 back
 on
 while
 trying
 to
 preserve
 some
 kind
 of
 dignity
 or
 young
 mothers
getting
yelled
at
for
bringing
baby
food
with
them
in
their
bags.


Once
 you
 have
 escaped
 the
 menacing
 glares
 from
 the
 security
 people
 you
 can
breathe
more
freely,
you
are
inside
the
airport!
At
this
time
you
can
explore
the
shops
and
restaurants
that
are
at
your
disposition
at
your
own
pace.
Until
they
indicate
that
they
will
be
boarding
your
plane
on
one
of
the
large
monitors
and
you
 have
 to
 make
 a
 run
 for
 your
 gate,
 which
 is
 when
 you
 will
 find
 it
 is
 on
 the
other
side
of
the
airport.
After
running
to
make
it
there
on
time
you
will
usually
find
 that
 the
 airline
 personnel
 is
 running
 late
 and
 that
 there
 is
 a
 huge
 line
 of
passengers
 waiting
 to
 get
 onto
 the
 plane.
 Once
 the
 extremely
 disorganized
process
of
boarding
everyone
on
the
plane
is
done
with
and
you
are
in
your
seat
you
can
relax,
nothing
horrible
will
happen
in
the
next
couple
of
hours,
that
is
if
you
don’t
count
some
of
the
food
that
they
will
serve
you
of
course.


When
the
plane
lands
you
could
believe
that
the
trip
is
almost
over,
but
usually
this
 is
 not
 the
 case.
 First
 everyone
 needs
 to
 get
 off
 the
 plane
 and
 into
 the
 next
airport,
where
signs
tell
you
in
which
direction
to
go.
Everyone
is
moving
along
fine
and
you
feel
like
you’re
in
the
clear
when
you
stumble
upon
immigration
and
the
 hundreds
 of
 people
 that
 are
 already
 standing
 in
 line.
 Getting
 through
immigration
 takes
 some
 impressive
 queuing
 skills,
 as
 they
 will
 only
 open
 a
couple
of
the
counters
instead
of
manning
all
of
them.
While
you’re
standing
in
line,
patiently
waiting
for
your
turn
you
suddenly
realize
what
time
it
is
and
that
you
 might
 miss
 your
 connecting
 flight
 if
 they
 don’t
 hurry
 up,
 even
 though
 you
took
an
extra
hour
to
transfer.
But
no
one
is
allowed
to
jump
the
line
and
so
you
just
 have
 to
 wait
 it
 out.
 For
 those
 lucky
 people
 that
 do
 not
 have
 to
 catch
 the
connecting
flight
there
is
still
the
little
thrill
of
going
to
pick
up
your
baggage
and
praying
that
your
suitcase
has
not
been
lost
by
the
airline.

 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 2

  • 3. So
I
believe
Benjamin
Franklin’s
quote
should
be
amended
to
say,
“nothing
in
life
is
certain,
except
death,
taxes
and
airport
problems”.
Yet
why
is
this
the
case
in
today’s
society
where
so
many
new
technologies
and
apps
are
being
developed
every
 single
 day?
 Why
 can’t
 we
 modify
 the
 system
 or
 at
 least
 implement
 little
things
that
will
improve
the
passenger’s
experience?
In
the
following
paragraphs
I
have
looked
at
every
part
of
the
airport
process
and
have
tried
to
understand
what
kind
of
digital
strategy
would
be
useful
in
improving
it.
There
are
a
lot
of
small
things
that
can
be
done
and
that
would
have
a
huge
impact
on
the
billions
of
people
that
fly
out
of
airports
all
around
the
world
every
year.




 
 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 3

  • 4. The
check‐in
process
Checking‐in
to
your
flight
at
the
airport
is
only
possible
a
couple
of
hours
before
the
flight
departs,
this
means
that
all
the
passengers
from
one
flight
will
stand
in
line
 at
 the
 counter
 at
 approximately
 the
 same
 time.
 Queues
 start
 forming
 once
the
 counters
 open,
 approximately
 three
 or
 four
 hours
 before
 departure
 and
remain
until
about
an
hour
before
the
plane
actually
leaves.
This
means
that
in
the
 case
 of
 a
 medium
 to
 large
 aircraft
 between
 300‐500
 passengers
 have
 to
check
in
to
their
flight
during
a
2‐3
hours
time
frame.
Even
if
processing
is
done
swiftly
 and
 a
 lot
 of
 counters
 are
 open,
 this
 is
 inevitably
 going
 to
 cause
 lines
 to
form.


The
 suggested
 solution
 that
 has
 been
implemented
 for
 a
 couple
 of
 years
 by
most
 airlines
 is
 the
 option
 to
 check‐in
online
 up
 until
 30
 hours
 before
departure.
 Passengers
 can
 then
 choose
to
 print
 out
 their
 boarding
 passes
themselves,
 or
 can
 opt
 to
 pick
 them
 up
at
special
kiosks
at
the
airport.
Baggage
can
 be
 simply
 be
 dropped
 of
 at
 one
 of
the
 counters,
 but
 as
 most
 people
 now
 fly
 with
 only
 a
 carry‐on
 this
 greatly
reduces
 the
 lines.
 One
 could
 still
 streamline
 the
 process
 as
 online
 check‐in
requires
passengers
to
indicate
whether
they
have
any
suitcases
that
need
to
be
checked‐in,
 allowing
 the
 airline
 to
 estimate
 the
 number
 of
 counters
 that
 they
need
to
provide
for
the
flight
(this
will
probably
vary
with
the
destinations
and
days
of
the
flight).


Mobile
 applications
 have
 also
 been
 used
 by
 airlines
 and
 instead
 of
 printing
 out
their
boarding
pass,
people
can
now
receive
an
email
on
their
smartphone
that
will
 allows
 them
 to
 board
 the
 plane.
 Your
 phone
 basically
 becomes
 your
 ticket
and
this
makes
things
a
lot
simpler
for
passengers.


The
 last
 problem
 passengers
 encounter
 when
 checking
 in
 is
 looking
 for
 the
terminal
 they
 are
 travelling
 from.
 Most
 major
 airports
 have
 several
 terminals
and
it
isn’t
always
easy
to
figure
out
where
you
need
to
go.
Having
live
updates
on
your
mobile
through
and
airport
specific
or
airline
specific
application
would
help
 people
 getting
 it
 right
 the
 first
 time,
 making
 sure
 they
 don’t
 lose
 time
transferring
between
terminals.


This
 application
 could
 also
 provide
 information
 such
 as
 flight
 delays
 or
 the
estimated
 time
 needed
 to
 pass
 through
 security
 and
 get
 to
 the
 gate.
 People
always
make
sure
they
leave
early
enough
for
the
airport
to
make
sure
they
don’t
miss
their
flight,
just
in
case
there
are
long
lines
or
there
is
traffic.
Having
an
app
telling
 you
 that
 the
 wait
 for
 security
 is
 extremely
 short
 or
 extremely
 long
 can
help
people
plan
their
travel
better,
making
sure
they
don’t
wait
at
the
gate
for
two
hours
or
miss
their
flights.


 
 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 4

  • 5. Passing
through
security
All
the
airlines
at
the
airport
now
in
advance
as
well
as
in
real‐time
how
many
passengers
are
flying
on
their
planes
and
at
what
time
they
will
be
flying.
Once
a
passenger
arrives
at
the
airport
and
checks
in
they
know
that
his
next
step
will
be
the
security
checkpoint.
By
collecting
the
data
for
all
the
airlines
it
is
possible
for
 the
 airport
 to
 estimate
 how
 many
 people
 will
 be
 going
 through
 security
 at
any
 time.
 This
 will
 have
 to
 be
 an
 estimation
 based
 on
 the
 real‐time
 data,
 yet
 it
can
be
calculated
pretty
accurately
by
looking
at
past
statistics.
Knowing
that
a
big
 flight
 will
 be
 leaving
 in
 two
 hours
 means
 that
 the
 passengers
 will
 be
 going
through
 security
 and
 that
 there
 needs
 to
 be
 enough
 staff
 at
 the
 security
checkpoint.
As
such
airlines
can
estimate
when
they
need
to
increase
personnel
and
 when
 they
 will
 be
 able
 to
 decrease
 the
 staff.
 This
 would
 allow
 for
 a
 more
dynamic
scheduling
of
security
personnel
depending
on
the
flow
of
people
at
the
airport,
and
would
avoid
the
usual
lines
and
bottlenecks
that
are
created
when
large
groups
of
people
arrive
all
at
once.

Another
 time‐consuming
 part
 of
 the
 security
 process
 is
 that
 people
 are
 now
required
to
take
off
their
shoes,
jacket,
belts
and
other
metal
items
before
being
allowed
to
go
through
the
metal
detector.
The
process
of
removing
the
clothes
is
a
 slow
 one,
 and
 after
 being
 allowed
 through
 the
 detector
 people
 need
 to
 get
dressed
again,
creating
bottlenecks
for
the
people
waiting
behind
them.
I
believe
this
 process
 could
 be
 streamlined
 if
 security
 would
 just
 accept
 to
 use
 more
modern
technology
such
as
full
body
scans
where
people
no
longer
have
to
take
anything
 off.
 The
 best
 solution
 would
 be
 to
 have
 everyone
 go
 through
 these
machines
 and
 if
 possible
 even
 with
 their
 carry‐on,
 and
 then
 randomly
 pick
 out
passengers
 based
 on
 a
 computer
 algorithm
 and
 search
 these
 people
 more
thoroughly.



 One
 recently
 developed
 machine
 called
 the
 passive
 millimeter
 wave
 scanner
 uses
 extremely
 high
 frequency
 radio
 waves
 in
 order
 to
 perform
 a
 full‐ body
 scan
 of
 a
 passenger.
 The
 method
 produces
 an
 image
 that
 allows
 the
 security
 personnel
 to
 identify
any
foreign
objects
 and
it
looks
like
someone
is
 virtually
 naked
 with
 all
 foreign
 object
 identified
 by
 a
 darker
 color.
 The
 scan
takes
approximately
15
seconds
and
doesn’t
require
any
clothing
to
be
removed.
There
 has
 been
 some
 concern
 around
 these
 machines
 as
 they
 are
 believed
 to
invade
 people’s
 privacy,
 but
 I
 believe
 that
 offering
 two
 different
 lines
 at
 the
airport,
one
with
traditional
methods
and
one
with
this
technology
would
solve
the
issue.

 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 5

  • 6. Waiting
time
On
the
other
side
of
the
security
checkpoint
there
is
a
whole
world
of
shops
and
cafés
waiting
for
passengers.
It
is
possible
to
by
duty
free
items
such
as
alcohol,
perfumes
and
gadgets
or
one
can
have
a
nice
meal
at
one
of
the
restaurants.
The
layout
of
airports
can
be
confusing
though,
and
it
is
hard
to
know
how
far
away
from
the
gate
one
really
is,
which
often
leads
passengers
to
go
directly
to
their
gates
 causing
 them
 to
 miss
 out
 on
 that
 extra
 half
 an
 hour
 of
 shopping.
 A
 very
useful
 tool
 for
 all
 passengers
 would
 be
 a
 special
 airport
 app
 on
 their
 mobile
phones
that
gives
them
access
to
an
interactive
map.


 Such
an
app
would
be
the
perfect
tool
for
 the
shops
and
the
restaurants
to
promote
 themselves:
 they
 can
 for
 example
 give
 customers
 coupons
 directly
 on
 their
 phone,
or
inform
them
about
any
ongoing
 promotions.
 The
 passengers
 would
 only
 have
 to
 scan
 their
 phones
 at
 the
 shop
 in
 order
to
use
the
coupon
and
it
would
also
 no
 longer
 be
 necessary
 to
 show
 your
 boarding
 pass
 at
 the
 counter
 as
 the
 information
is
stored
on
the
phone.


Geo‐location
within
the
airport
could
be
very
precise
and
would
allow
airlines
to
notify
people
when
they
need
to
start
walking
towards
their
gates.
If
someone’s
shopping
 at
 the
 other
 side
 of
 the
 airport
 he
 or
 she
 will
 need
 to
 start
 walking
earlier
then
someone
that
is
right
next
to
the
gate.
Knowing
that
they
will
receive
a
 notification
 will
 allow
 people
 to
 sit
 down
 for
 a
 coffee
 somewhere
 without
getting
up
every
5
minutes
to
check
one
of
the
boards
outside
the
restaurant.


Sometimes
you
get
to
the
airport
at
the
last
 minute
 and
 have
 to
 hurry
 to
 your
gate;
 this
 mostly
 happens
 on
 early
morning
flights
and
means
that
people
usually
 don’t
 have
 time
 to
 get
 their
much‐needed
 dose
 of
 caffeine.
 Once
they
 are
 through
 security
 passengers
rush
 to
 their
 gate
 and
 then
 sometimes
have
to
wait
there
for
an
additional
10
minutes
 before
 being
 allowed
 aboard
the
plane,
time
they
could
have
used
to
grab
 coffee,
 where
 it
 not
 that
 there
 usually
 aren’t
 any
 coffee
 stands
 near
 the
actual
 gates.
 The
 interactive
 map
 would
 be
 able
 to
 take
 into
 account
 that
 they
want
 to
 get
 coffee
 and
 can
 then
 show
 them
 which
 route
 they
 need
 to
 take
 in
order
to
make
it
to
their
gate
on
time.
If
the
app
is
aware
of
the
actual
lines
at
the
different
cafés
it
can
even
calculate
how
long
it
 will
take
for
the
passenger
and
can
 re‐program
 the
 directions
 if
 necessary
 or
 it
 can
 let
 them
 know
 that
 they
really
won’t
have
time
for
coffee.

 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 6

  • 7. Boarding

The
 boarding
 process
 never
 starts
 at
 the
 time
 it
 is
 supposed
 to,
 but
 having
 the
app
notify
you
when
you
need
to
go
to
your
gate
allows
you
to
do
more
useful
things
then
just
waiting
around
the
seating
area.
This
also
avoids
the
huge
lines
that
 are
 usually
 formed
 around
 20
 minutes
 before
 the
 boarding
 is
 supposed
 to
start
 and
 that
 make
 the
 process
 very
 chaotic.
 On
 most
 commercial
 airlines
people
 actually
 have
 assigned
 seats
 and
 there
 is
 no
 reason
 you
 have
 to
 be
 the
first
 passenger
 on
 the
 plane.
 Airlines
 ask
 people
 to
 board
 the
 plane
 by
 waves,
starting
with
the
premium
flyers
(business
class
and
frequent
flyer
card
holders)
 and
then
proceed
to
the
rest
of
the
 passengers.
It
has
been
shown
that
 boarding
the
last
rows
of
the
plane
 first
is
more
efficient
then
starting
 with
 the
 front,
 as
 this
 creates
 less
 blockage
 in
 the
 aisles.
 As
 people
 now
have
their
boarding
passes
on
 their
 phones
 you
 can
 notify
 those
 that
 are
 allowed
 to
 board
 at
 first
 before
you
notify
the
next
wave,
as
 such
 you
 create
 less
 of
 chaos
 and
 the
 process
 will
 be
 much
 smoother.


When
you
only
know
that
they
are
boarding
the
plane
you
don’t
actually
now
if
you
need
to
rush
to
the
gate
or
if
you
still
have
10
minutes
before
it
is
your
turn.
An
app
could
inform
passengers
of
which
seats
the
airline
is
allowing
to
board
in
real‐time
and
could
also
give
you
information
on
how
long
the
line
is.
If
there
are
still
 42
 people
 waiting
 to
 board
 the
 plane
 it
 doesn’t
 make
 sense
 to
 run
 for
 the
gate,
but
if
there
is
no
one
left,
you
had
better
make
sure
you
get
moving!


An
app
can
also
show
a
map
of
the
seats
that
are
on
the
plane,
allowing
people
to
check
where
they
are
seated
and
where
they
will
need
to
go.
They
can
also
check
where
 their
 friends
 are
 sitting
 and
 even
 switch
 seats
 with
 people
 if
 they
 so
desire.
 One
 could
 even
 imagine
 creating
 a
 sort
 of
 social
 network
 where
passengers
can
post
their
mood
or
ideas
in
forms
of
status
updates
and
that
will
be
linked
to
their
seat.
This
way
a
passenger
can
share
their
seat
if
they
so
desire
and
 start
 talking
 to
 the
 person
 sitting
 next
 to
 them
 even
 before
 they
 board
 the
plane.
Or
if
they
meet
someone
while
waiting
in
the
seating
area
they
can
make
a
request
 to
 sit
 together.
 If
 airlines
 have
 information
 on
 the
 passengers,
 such
 as
mood,
hobby
and
what
they
plan
to
do
on
the
plane
then
they
can
even
suggest
changing
seats
based
on
a
matchmaking
algorithm.
Passengers
would
have
to
opt
into
this
of
course,
and
everyone
should
be
able
to
indicate
they
don’t
want
to
be
bothered.
But
someone
who
wants
to
sleep
during
the
flight
would
probably
be
much
 happier
 to
 be
 seated
 next
 to
 someone
 doing
 crossword
 puzzles
 then
someone
who’s
very
talkative
or
a
kid
playing
war
games
on
their
Gameboy.


 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 7

  • 8. Upon
landing
Once
the
plane
has
finished
taxiing
and
is
at
the
gate
everyone
disembarks
and
starts
 making
 their
 way
 to
 the
 exits
 and
 the
 baggage
 pick‐up
 point.
 In
 some
airports
the
way
is
clearly
indicated
by
signs
whereas
other
airports
make
it
very
easy
 for
 people
 to
 get
 lost.
 For
 example
 at
 Amsterdam’s
 international
 airport,
Schiphol,
passengers
arrive
at
the
main
departure
gates
and
find
themselves
in
a
huge
crowd
of
people
and
the
signs
pointing
toward
the
exits
are
quite
hard
to
spot.
It
would
be
much
easier
if
passengers
had
access
to
an
interactive
map
of
the
arrival
airport,
allowing
them
to
find
their
way
if
ever
they
want
to
stop
and
buy
something
before
going
outside.


It
would
also
be
fun
to
receive
live
updates
on
the
status
of
your
bags.
This
would
be
 possible
 by
 using
 the
 tags
 that
 are
 fixed
 to
 every
 piece
 of
 luggage
 as
 they
include
a
bar
code
that
can
be
directly
associated
to
someone’s
boarding
pass.
Or
passengers
 could
 use
 their
 phone
 and
 scan
 the
 receipt
 that
 they
 receive
 when
they
 check‐in
 a
 bag.
 This
 way
 everyone
 can
 see
 where
 their
 luggage
 is
 at:
whether
it
is
still
on
the
plane,
on
one
of
the
airport
carts
or
if
it
is
already
on
the
conveyor
 belt.
 Airports
 could
 even
 attach
 pictures
 of
 different
 places
 along
 the
route
 that
 are
 shown
 once
 the
 bag
 gets
 there.
 This
 would
 also
 re‐assure
passengers
that
their
bag
is
safely
on
the
plane
with
them
and
has
not
been
lost
somewhere
along
the
way.
 
 
A
 lot
 of
 people
 have
 connecting
 flights
 that
 they
 need
 to
 catch
 once
 they
 get
 to
the
airport
and
it
can
be
very
useful
to
have
access
to
the
list
of
connecting
flights
and
the
gates
that
they
are
flying
out
of.
Having
the
interactive
map
then
allows
passengers
 to
 estimate
 how
 much
 time
 they
 have
 to
 get
 to
 the
 next
 gate
 and
whether
they
can
still
stop
for
that
cup
of
coffee
on
their
way
there.



 
 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 8

  • 9. Immigration
Unfortunately
 it
 is
 not
 always
 possible
 to
 rush
 of
 the
 plane,
 grab
 your
 bag
 and
jump
 into
 a
 cab.
 When
 you
 travel
 outside
 of
 your
 country
 there
 is
 passport
control
and
customs
that
you
will
need
to
go
through.
Right
now
you
will
need
to
show
your
actual
passport
but
one
can
imagine
that
in
the
future
there
will
be
an
app
that
allows
you
to
hand
them
your
phone
with
a
special
passport
app
linked
to
 your
 fingerprints
 (you
 would
 for
 example
 have
 to
 press
 your
 finger
 to
 the
screen
in
order
to
unlock
it).
Just
by
scanning
the
phone
or
by
interacting
with
it
in
 some
 other
 way,
 officials
 could
 check
 your
 identity
 and
 verify
 that
 you
 are
who
you
say
you
are.
Having
a
global
database
of
the
world’s
citizens
would
be
very
helpful
for
this.

When
 you
 arrive
 in
 the
 US
 you
are
 also
 required
 to
 fill
 out
 a
paper
 custom
 form,
 this
 usually
very
annoying
for
you
have
to
go
looking
 for
 certain
 information
such
 as
 you
 passport
 number,
your
flight
number
as
well
as
the
address
 of
 where
 you
 will
 be
staying
 in
 the
 US.
 Being
 able
 to
fill
 out
 this
 form
 on
 your
 phone
directly
would
make
this
process
much
easier
for
passengers
as
all
the
 information
 is
 already
 stored
 there.
 It
 would
 also
 make
 the
 information
 on
the
forms
more
readable
for
the
custom
officers,
as
well
as
saving
a
lot
trees
and
storage
space.


Once
you
arrive
at
the
immigration
point
it
would
be
easy
to
give
passengers
a
number
 in
 the
 queue
 by
 having
 them
 tap
 their
 phone
 against
 a
 reader.
 There
could
then
be
seats
where
people
can
wait
instead
of
having
them
stand
in
line
for
hours.
You
would
simply
wait
until
your
number
is
being
called
and
then
go
up
to
 the
 counter.
This
 might
make
the
process
 a
 little
slower
as
 people
 would
take
longer
to
get
to
the
counter,
yet
this
can
be
remedied
by
making
sure
there
are
always
enough
booths
open
for
the
amount
of
waiting
passengers.
There
is
no
need
to
overstaff
all
the
time,
but
airports
know
how
many
passengers
are
the
arriving
 flights
 and
 they
 also
 have
 access
 to
 the
 proportion
 of
 foreigners
 to
expect
 real‐time.
 This
 definitely
 allows
 them
 to
 plan
 ahead,
 and
 schedule
 staff
accordingly:
the
more
passengers
arriving,
the
more
staff
is
required.


Sometimes
passengers
have
an
extremely
short
layover
and
need
to
catch
their
connecting
 flight.
 Currently
 you
 are
 not
 allowed
 to
 jump
 ahead
 in
 line
 and
 this
causes
 a
 lot
 of
 people
 to
 miss
 their
 flights.
 Having
 your
 boarding
 pass
 on
 your
phone
would
allow
immigration
to
be
aware
of
your
situation
and
they
can
then
create
a
special
line
for
those
passengers
or
can
give
them
a
faster
number.

 
 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 9

  • 10. Conclusion
There
 are
 a
 lot
 of
 things
 that
 can
 be
 done
 in
 order
 to
 make
 the
 experience
 of
travelling
 by
 airplane
 a
 lot
 more
 pleasurable
 and
 efficient.
 I
 believe
 that
 this
essay
has
explored
the
different
options
a
digital
strategy
can
provide
and
would
encourage
airports
to
start
thinking
about
what
they
can
do
in
order
to
improve.
Some
of
the
things
that
I
have
suggested
are
easy
to
implement,
such
as
creating
an
 app
 with
 an
 interactive
 map,
 and
 would
 still
 have
 tremendous
 influence
 on
the
 way
 passengers
 interact
 with
 the
 airport.
 It
 should
 also
 be
 fairly
 easy
 to
obtain
data
from
the
airlines
in
order
to
streamline
both
the
security
process
as
well
as
immigration.
I
have
to
admit
I
don’t
understand
why
it
has
to
take
so
long
to
 open
 more
 counters
 when
 the
 airport
 has
 been
 aware
 of
 the
 number
 of
passengers
 arriving
 for
 a
 couple
 of
 hours.
 Other
 suggestions
 such
 a
 digital
passport
 will
 most
 probably
 take
 a
 lot
 more
 time
 to
 implement
 due
 to
 safety
considerations
 but
 also
 the
 fact
 that
 it
 would
 require
 several
 entities
 to
 work
together.



Benjamin
 Franklin
 was
 right
 after
 all,
 airport
 problems
 can
 be
 avoided,
 and
airports
will
only
need
to
develop
a
digital
strategy
in
order
to
do
so.















Sources:
 • All
cartoons
come
from
the
following
website:
www.caglecartoons.com
 • Information
on
the
body
scanners
was
found
on
Wikipedia
 • The
 rest
 of
 the
 text
 was
 created
 entirely
 from
 my
 own
 experiences
 with
 airport
 and
 flights
 around
 the
 world
 and
 the
 fair
 amount
 of
 frustration
 that
has
been
building
up
over
the
years.
 “Improving
the
airport
experience
through
digital
strategy”
–
by
Mischa
KRIENS
 10