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06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
06.linux basic-operations-2
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06.linux basic-operations-2

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  • 1. Linux: Basic Operations - 2 Minsuk Lee Hansung University, Seoul, Korea minsuk@hansung.ac.krNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 2. Simple Shell usage • Invoking Terminal  • Type any command and [ENTER] • BIG TIPs !! – Use ‘←,↑→↓’, [INS], [DEL],[HOME],[END] keys to edit command line – Try [tab] - It completes filename or shows all available choices – When output stops, try [SPACE], mouse scroll, ‘q’ to continue or to quit – $ exit -- will end the terminalNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 3. man (1) • Shows manual page of Linux commands, libraries, utilities • Usage : $ man [options] [section] item – Item can be program, function, file, anything in /usr/share/man/*/ • Options : – Sections 1. Executable programs or shell commands 2. System calls (functions provided by the kernel) 3. Library calls (functions within program libraries) 4. Special files (usually found in /dev) 5. File formats and conventions e.g. /etc/passwd 6. Games 7. Miscellaneous (including macro packages and conventions), e.g. man(7), groff(7) 8. System administration commands (usually only for root) 9. Kernel routines [Non standard] ‘$ man printf ‘ show man page of shell command printf ‘$ man 3 printf ‘ show man page of printf() library ‘$ man -a printf ‘ show man page of both of the twoNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 4. man (2) • Options : -a : display all available manual pages of the item -k : list all man page items includes the given item name ($ apropos –r item) -f : shows very short descriptions -Tps : output as Postscript format (to be converted into pdf) • Example $ man man $ man -Tps 3 printf | ps2pdf - printf.pdf • Alternatives $ info item : shows detail information, if the item is available in /usr/share/info $ command –help : shows help messages (options) of the command • PLEASE READ MAN PAGES OF COMMANDS, FUNCTIONS YOU USE !!NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 5. Name pattern matching • Specifying multiple files(directories) – Work for ALL commands • ‘*’ means any string (multiple, any characters including null) • ‘?’ means any single character • [a-s] : means any single character between ‘a ’ and ‘s ’ – E.g., [1-7c-f], [acf2A-Z], … – ‘$ rm * ’ : means everything in current directory – ‘$ rm directory/* ‘ : means everything in directory – ‘$ rm s*s ‘ : means files or directories start and end with ‘s ’ – ‘$ rm 6[ab]x* ‘ : means files or directories start with ‘6ax ’ or ‘6bx ’ • See man page of bash ( $ man bash ) for more – Such as ?(patten-list), *(patten-list), +(pattern-list), …NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 6. Pipe and redirection • Standard Input and Output – In Shell, It’s Keyboard input and Screen Output, by default – Pipe feeds standard output into other command’s standard input – Redirection redirects the standard input/output from/to files ‘$ ls –l | more’ : feed the output of ‘ls –l’ to ‘more’ ‘$ ls –1 | sort –r | more’ : ‘ls -1’ then, ‘sort’ in reverse order, and ‘more’ ‘$ ls –l > file ’ : redirect the output of ‘ls –l’ to file (overwrite or create) ‘$ ls –l >> file ’ : redirect the output of ‘ls –l’ to file (append) ‘$ cat a b > c ’ : concatenate file ‘a ‘ and ‘b ‘ into file ‘c ‘ ‘$ sort < source > destination ’ : ‘sort’ source, into destination • Standard Error ‘$ command 2> file’ : redirect error message of command to fileNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 7. grep • Prints lines matching a pattern • Usage : $ grep [options] pattern file… • Options : – -i : ignore case – -n : print line number – -H : with file name – -r : read all files under directory recursivelyNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 8. find (1) • Searches for files in a directory hierarchy • Usage : $ find [options] [path...] [expression] • Options : -H, -L, -P : controls symbolic links (see, $man find) • Expression for [match test] [Action] : – Match test -name : ‘$ find / -name thisname’ finds files with thisname, thisname can be pattern (*, ?, …) -executable : executable files -user : ‘$ find / -name user1’ finds files belonging to user1 -atime : ‘$ find / -atime n’ finds files accessed within n days -ctime , -mtime : files created or modified within n days -newer : ‘$ find / -newer file’ finds files modified more recently than file -type c : ‘$ find / -type c’ finds files of type c, (c can be ‘d’ : directory, ‘f’ : regular file, ‘l’ : symbolic link, ‘b’,’c’: device file) -… – Action -delete : delete the found files -exec command : apply command to the found files in command ‘{}’ is used for found file command ends with ; ( is escape code) -…NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 9. find (2) • Example – Just find – find and grepNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 10. ps • Reports a snapshot of the current processes • Usage : ps [options] • Options : ax : all process in system, same as ‘–e’ r : only running process nnn : only process id nnn, same as ‘-pid pid_list list’ (e.g., ‘$ ps –pid 107,109’) l, s, u, v, x : format long, signal, user-oriented, virtual memory, register format m : shows threads after processNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 11. pstree • Display a tree of processes • Usages : $ pstree [options] [pid_or_user] – $ pstree myuser (Terminal related part) – $ pstreeNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 12. top (1) • Display Linux tasks • Usage : $ top [options] [pid…] [Commands to change ] See man page !NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 13. top (2) ‘;’ multiple commands ‘>’ redirection <type x.c> <endless loop code> x.c Ctrl-D to end edit Compile x.c to loop ‘&’ execute background execute ./loop Ctrl-Z to suspend ‘bg’ resume in backgroundNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 14. top (3) • top with a endless loop task • top with two endless loop tasksNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 15. kill • Send a signal to a process • Usage : $ kill –signal [pid] – $ kill -9 100 : kills process 100 – $ kill -9 -1 : kill all (you can kill) • Signals : -9 (KILL) : kill process -1 (HUB) : restart Others : see man page !NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 16. tar, bzip2, gzip (1) • Compresses files and directories • Usage : $ tar [options] path… – $ tar cvf name.tar directory : Archive (no compress) directory into name.tar – $ tar xvf name.tar : Extract name.tar • Options : – c : create, x : extrace, t : list – v : verbose (lists file names) – j : use bzip2, z : use gzip for compress / uncompress – f filename : specify archive filename • Bzip2 : compress a file into file.bz2 – ‘$ bzip2 file ’ to compress, ‘$ bzip2 –d file.bz2 ’ to uncompress • gzip : compress a file into file.gz – ‘$ gzip file ’ to compress, ‘$ gzip –d file.gz ’ to uncompress • Example – ‘$ tar cjf file.bz2 files-directories ‘ : tar & compress files-directories into file.bz2 – ‘$ tar xjvf file.bz2 ‘ : uncompress and untar file.bz2NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 17. tar, bzip2, gzip (2) tar & bzip2 list archive Remove temp directory un-bzip2 and untarNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 18. df, du • df report file system disk space usage • Usage : $ df [options] [file] • Options -h : human readable units ! • du estimates file space usage • Usage : $ du [options] [file] • Options -h : human readable units ! -s : display only totalNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 19. sudo • Execute a command as another user (such as super user) • Usage : $ sudo [–u username] [command] – $ sudo –u other-user /bin/bash : invoke shell with user other-user – $ sudo /bin/bash : invoke superuser’s shell – $ sudo command : run command in superuser permission • Only selected user can get superuser permission • (defined in /etc/sudoers) ? $ sudo rm -rf ./* vs. $ sudo rm –rf /*NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 20. chown, chmod • Changes owner, permission of files and direct • Usage : $ chown [owner][:group] file… $ chmod mode file… • Options -R : recursively change • Permission issue – $ chown can be done by superuser – $ chmod needs enough permission • Permission (read,write,execute) mRWXRWXRWX user others group Type (file, directory, device)NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 21. hostname, uname – $ hostname : name of this computer • Search domain, name server are defined in /etc/resolv.conf – $ uname : Operating System Name as compiledNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 22. ifconfig Use GUI • Configures a network interface To configure Network ! • Usage : $ ifconfig [interface or –a] $ ifconfig interface [aftype] options | address ... – interface is the name of network device • (e.g., eth0 : Ethernet, lo : loopback)NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 23. ping • Send ICMP ECHO_REQUEST to network hosts • Usage : $ ping [options] destination – destination is ip-address (a.b.c.d) or hostname • Options : -c count : stop after count -i interval : ping interval -n : display ip address rather than hostname -s packetsize : set packet sizeNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 24. netstat (1) • Prints network connections, routing tables, interface statistics, masquerade connections, and multicast memberships • Usage : $ netstat [options] • Options : -r : print routing table -i : print interface statistics -n : display ip address rather than hostname -p : print pid and program name -l : print only listening sockets -a : print both listening & non listening -t, -u : print socket using tcp, udp protocolNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 25. netstat (2)NEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 26. Network files • /etc/hosts : stores hostname and ip-address • /etc/resolv.conf : ip-address of name server • /etc/services : name of network servicesNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA
  • 27. Let’s Practice • find & grep – Build up directories – Try $ find , $ grep, and mix it • Top – Edit ‘x.c’, compile into ‘loop’ – $ top – Run ‘loop’ background and $ top, – And once more, see how ‘loop’ processes share the CPU – Try ‘$ pstree’ to find ‘loop’ process – $ kill the ‘loop’ process • Tar, bzip2 – As in slide • Try $ df, $ du, $ chown, $ chmod, $ sudo • Try $ ping, $ netstat [options], $ ifconfigNEAOSS MC2.0 CC-BY 2.0 KR, © Korea OSS Promotion Forum, NIPA

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