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How Public Design? Public Services Lab - NESTA
 

How Public Design? Public Services Lab - NESTA

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    How Public Design? Public Services Lab - NESTA How Public Design? Public Services Lab - NESTA Presentation Transcript

    • Reimagining public servicesHow Public Design? Copenhagen Design Week 2 September 2011
      Philip Colligan
      Public Services Lab
    • Reimagining public services
      (and the role of design in making it happen)
      The innovation imperative
      People powered public services
      Why it’s difficult and how could it be easier
    • A new reality
      The innovation imperative
      • Delivering the budget reductions
      • Cumulative impact of economic situation and public sector finances
      • No prospect of returning to previous levels of investment anytime soon
      • Longer term challenges: ageing society, long-term health conditions, consequences of lifestyles, changing expectations and more complex needs
      • A challenge to the way that we think about public services
    • The innovation imperative
      • A new financial reality, with no prospect of returning to previous levels of investment anytime soon
      • Longer term challenges, ageing society, long-term health conditions, consequences of lifestyles, changing expectations and more complex needs
      • A model of public services that is ill-equipped to respond to new challenges and opportunities
      • Growing recognition of the need for radical new solutions and a body of knowledge and examples from around the world
    • People powered public services
      The most powerful solutions are found when we harness the potential of citizens, communities, front line workers and collaborative technologies
    • People powered public services
      Age Unlimited
      Transforming Early Years
      Prototype Barnet
    • Age Unlimited
      Nesta supporting the creation of innovative services that help people age well
      Focused on prevention (people in their 50s and 60s), planning for retirement and keeping people healthy and active
      Scotland – working with individuals in their 50s and 60s to establish new community and social ventures
      England – working with organisations to involve users in the design of new services
    • Age Unlimited
      Meet Lynne Wealleans from the Beth Johnson Foundation in Stoke on Trent
      Started with a recognition that people needed to plan better and earlier for their retirement
      Supported to test and develop the idea by involving users of Beth Johnson’s services
    • Age Unlimited
      Age Unlimited
      Users involved at all stages of the process
      Interviews, storyboards, user review and prioritisation, support from experts in design methods and social innovation
      Beth Johnson is now prototyping ideas co-created with users for volunteer-led retirement planning services
      Learning about how to make user-led innovation easier and more accessible
      Meet Lynne Wealleans from the Beth Johnson Foundation in Stoke on Trent
      Started with a recognition that people needed to plan better and earlier for their retirement
    • Age Unlimited
      Meet Lynne Wealleans from the Beth Johnson Foundation in Stoke on Trent
      Started with a recognition that people needed to plan better and earlier for their retirement
      Supported to test and develop the idea by involving users of Beth Johnson’s services
    • Transforming Early Years
      NESTA and Innovation Unit working with early years services in six localities
      Groups of families and professionals
      co-creating different, better and cheaper services (radical efficiency)
      Mixed teams, resource audit, ethnography, horizon scanning, co-design and prototyping
      Consistent themes - changing relationships between families and professionals, creating opportunities for peer support, user-led services
    • Transforming Early Years
    • Transforming Early Years
      Children’s Centre in Whitley interviewed 32 families (over 90 children)
      Found that they weren’t getting the support they wanted or needed, despite the services being regarded as highly performing
      Co-created an innovative model that does meet those needs, including a new role for expert parents
      Melani now supporting other teams to apply ethnographic techniques to their services
    • Prototype Barnet
      Nesta and thinkpublic working with London Borough of Barnet to use prototyping to develop new services
      Initially focused on a community coaches programme for high needs families
      Exploring how prototyping and other design methods could be used by council staff and community members
      Community coach service being tested and prototyping being applied to projects to prevent deaths in cold weather and offender management
    • Prototype Barnet
    • Why it’s hard and how it could be easier
    • Why it’s hard and how it could be easier
      • Lots of examples of design-led innovation in public services, but still at the margins and mostly early stage
      • Some exceptions that suggest potential for scale (Department of Health, Circles, Life, Dementia Advisers)
      • Real challenges on both sides
      “more highly paid consultants that don’t have to implement any of the ideas they come up with”
      “I don’t want to go into another public service and just generate insights”
    • Why it’s hard and how it could be easier
      Culture eats strategy for breakfast
      Peter Drucker
    • Why it’s hard and how it could be easier
      • Barriers around culture, politics, commissioning practice, professionals, silos, accounting for value, the incumbency bias
      • Opportunity to re-imagine the role of local services – incentive and appetite, conducive policy environment, emerging evidence and examples
    • Why it’s hard and how it could be easier
      • Set up projects in the right way: mixed teams, clear expectations, respect different contributions, iterative
      • Get political commitment and permission, investment not purchasing
      • Small enough to fail, big enough to have impact, address core challenges and costs
      • Focus on learning and building new skills
    • www.nesta.org.uk
      philip.colligan@nesta.org.uk
      @nesta_uk
      @philipcolligan