University of Minnesota Combined Heat and Power Facility

1,068 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,068
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
16
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

University of Minnesota Combined Heat and Power Facility

  1. 1. Posted by http://MillCityTimes.com University
of
Minnesota
Combined
Heat
&
Power/Old
Main
Proposal
July
6,
2011
This spring, the University of Minnesota released the University Twin Cities Campus Climate Action Plan. The Climate Action Plan is a roadmap for the Twin Cities campus to reach climate neutrality by 2050, with an intermediate goal of reducing the carbon footprint by half by the year 2020. A stepping stone toward these goals is the addition of a Combined Heat and Power facility. The Combined Heat and Power facility would also solve another significant issue in that it would provide a crucial second source of steam for the Twin Cities campus. Steam is used to heat and cool buildings as well as to sterilize lab and medical equipment. The University’s risk assessment identified having the campus sole source of steam at Southeast Steam Plant as a major risk for the State’s $10 billion physical asset to conduct the mission of teaching, research, and outreach. After evaluating alternative locations, the recommended location for a Combined Heat and Power facility is at the Old Main site just west of the Dinkytown Bikeway Bridge and the Education Sciences Building. The Old Main steam plant was decommissioned a few years ago, but the facility remains, at the hub of the steam distribution system for the campus.  Two natural gas fueled combustion turbines would be installed to generate steam and electricity. If the project goes forward, there will be a multi‐year implementation period, and there will be a State pollution control permitting process. To initiate consideration, funding for the Combined Heat and Power facility is proposed to be part of the preliminary 2012 capital request and will be reviewed by the Board of Regents Facilities Committee at its meeting on July 6. The capital request will then come back to the Board of Regents for approval later this fall. The Regents meeting agendas are online at http://www1.umn.edu/regents/meetings.html. Why
Old
Main?
 • It mitigates the risks associated with having a single source of steam for the Minneapolis campus. This  has been identified as one of the campus’s top two risks by property insurers. It also would enable the  campus to maintain a second source of steam if a decision is made in the future to decommission the  Southeast Steam Plant and move to a new facility in the northeast part of campus.  • It can meet the peak steam capacity needs at a significantly lower cost than a new steam plant at a  different location.   • Old Main is large enough to serve as a utility facility for steam, electricity, and the next District chilled  water plant, without building any additional facilities.   • A Combined Heat and Power Facility uses ‘waste’ heat from generating electricity, this efficiency  reduces the University’s carbon footprint by 62,000 metric tons of CO2.  
  2. 2. Posted by http://MillCityTimes.com 
Proposal
and
Scope
of
Work
 • Estimated investment of $81 million.  • Centralize steam utility operations at Old Main.   • Add two 7 MW Combustion turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators with duct burners to  provide 250,000 pph to meet steam demand growth and replace vintage coal boilers. They would be  located at the Old Main Heating Plant and require the addition of chimneys.  • Provide dedicated space for a future chilled water cluster plant in Old Main.   • Address the building deficiencies in Old Main while developing a multiple utility services building on  the edge of campus. Proposed
Benefits
The benefits of renovating the Old Main site include:  • The Climate Action Plan calls for the University to become carbon neutral by 2050. A Combined Heat  and Power operation can significantly reduce carbon emissions.  • A Combined Heat and Power facility would allow the University to produce more of its electrical load  and better control utility costs.   • The Office of Risk Management lists the lack of steam redundancy as one of the University’s top risks  and a CHP would provide a redundant stem source.  • The Old Main site is the primary entrance for the steam tunnel system. Moving the University steam  shop from the Como yard to Old Main will reduce operating costs and the number of trips through  area neighborhoods. Next
Steps
July/August – University will host informational meetings on the proposal November – University Regents act on Final Fiscal Year 2012 Capital Request 
For
More
Information:
Jan Morlock Community Relations 612‐624‐8318 Mike Berthelson Facilities Management 612‐626‐1091  

×