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B plata modern_paperback

  1. 1. 2
  2. 2. t D q8 k racula 06q 3
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  4. 4. t D q8 k racula 06q BANTAM BOOKS NEW YORK TORONTO LONDON SYDNEY AUCKLAND 5
  5. 5. DRACULAby Bram StokerA Bantam BookCover artwork by Mikhail Plata copyright © 2010All rights reserved.Introduction copyright © 1981 by Bantam BooksNo part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information stor-age and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.For information address: Bantam Books.ISBN 0-553-21271-0Published simultaneously in the United States and CanadaBantam Books are published by Bantam Books, a division of Bantam Doubleday Dell Pub-lishing Group, Inc. Its trademark, consisting of the words “Bantam Books” and the por-trayal of a rooster, is Registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other coun-tries. Marca Registrada. Bantam Books, 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10103.Printed in the United States of America6
  6. 6. To t Hommy Beg wz l I
  7. 7. w6 3lw I 5b Contents Jonathan Harkers Journal 1 II Jonathan Harkers Journal 15 III Jonathan Harkers Journal 28 IV Jonathan Harkers Journal 42 V Letter, Miss Mina Murray To Miss Lucy Westenra 57 VI Mina Murrays Journal 66 VII Cutting From "The Dailygraph", 8 August 80 VIII Mina Murrays Journal 94 IX Letter, Mina Harker To Miss Lucy Westenra 110 X Letter, Dr. Seward To Hon. Arthur Holmwood 125II XI Lucy Westenras Diary 140 b
  8. 8. XII Dr. Sewards Diary 153 XIII Dr. Sewards Diary 171 XIV Mina Harkers Journal 188 XV Dr. Sewards Diary 204 XVI Dr. Sewards Diary 219 XVII Dr. Sewards Diary 231XVIII Dr. Sewards Diary 245 XIX Jonathan Harkers Journal 262 XX Jonathan Harkers Journal 276 XXI Dr. Sewards Diary 291 XXII Jonathan Harkers Journal 306XXIII Dr. Sewards Diary 319qXXIV Dr. Sewards phonograph diary spoken by van Helsing 333 m XXV Dr. Sewards Diary 348XXVI Dr. Sewards Diary 364XXVII Mina Harkers Journal 382 III
  9. 9. w Acknowledgments 5s incerest thanks to the Bantam Books publishers for distributing and putting up this manuscript as well as George Orton and his team for the modern English transliterations and translations into other languages. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the reading of them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variance with the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no statement of past things wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary, given from thestandpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the readingof them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variancewith the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is through-out no statement of past things wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen areexactly contemporary, given from the standpoints and within the range of knowledge ofthose who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the read-ing of them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at vari-ance with the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There isthroughout no statement of past things wherein memory may err, for all the recordschosen are exactly contemporary, given from the standpoints and within the range ofknowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequencewill be made manifest in the reading of them. All needless matters have been eliminat-ed, so that a history almost at variance with the possibilities of later-day belief may standforth as simple fact. There is throughout no statement of past things wherein memorymay err, for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary, given from the standpointsand within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers haveIV
  10. 10. Draculabeen placed in sequence will be made manifest in the reading of them. All needless mat-ters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variance with the possibilities oflater-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no statement of pastthings wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary,given from the standpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the readingof them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variancewith the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is through-out no statement of past things wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen areexactly contemporary, given from the standpoints and within the range of knowledge ofthose who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be mademanifest in the reading of them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that ahistory almost at variance with the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth assimple fact. There is throughout no statement of past things wherein memory may err,for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary, given from the standpoints andwithin the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the readingof them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variancewith the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is through-out no statement of past things wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen areexactly contemporary, given from the standpoints and within the range of knowledge ofthose who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be mademanifest in the reading of them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that ahistory almost at variance with the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth assimple fact. There is throughout no statement of past things wherein memory may err,for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary, given from the standpoints andwithin the range of knowledge of those who made them. V
  11. 11. w Introduction 5h air grows on the palms of Dracula’s hands. His ears are long and pointed. His red eyes glare out from under thick eyebrows that meet over a knife of a nose. His red, swollen lips are flagrant against the glimmer of his face, with its extraordinary pallor, its long white moustache, its prominent teet. His breath is rank. He is centuries old and unnaturally strong. Like Beowulf, he has a “grip of steel”; once he gets you he doesn’t let go. His intelligence is powerful, but his “child-brain” is entirely at the service of his appetites, the primitive hungers that civilization to maintain itself must deny. That is how he appears to others, but Dracula cannot see himself, for no mirror willcontain his image. Dracula is already a reflection , a shadow, an apparition, a matter ofmind rather than matter - and in any case, when we look for him in mirrors, our ownfaces get in the way. Nor can the light of day illuminate his murks, for until nightfall helikes to lie dormant in his coffin. “I love the shade and the shadow,” he says. His oppo-nent and opposite and alter ego, Dr. Abraham van Helsing, notes that Dracula’s “powerceases, as that of all evil things, at the coming of the day.” It is while respectable citi-zens rest dreaming in their beads that he romps among creatures subject to his com-mand and kindred to his spirit - wolves, bats, owls, rats, and mice - nocturnal predatorsor nocturnal invaders of our sheltering homes. Their forms are his to take on when hewill, and he can materialize out of mists, dust motes, moonbeams, out of whatever ourspellbound imaginations have at hand to work over. But he cannot cross any thresholdor any windowsill without an invitation from someone within who is responsive to hissuit. Once you let him in, he will hypnotize you, thus making it all the easier for you to dowhat you have willed him to will you to do. Hair grows on the palms of Dracula’s hands. His ears are long and pointed. His redeyes glare out from under thick eyebrows that meet over a knife of a nose. His red, swol-len lips are flagrant against the glimmer of his face, with its extraordinary pallor, its longVI
  12. 12. Draculawhite moustache, its prominent teet. His breath is rank. He is centuries old and unnatu-rally strong. Like Beowulf, he has a “grip of steel”; once he gets you he doesn’t let go. Hisintelligence is powerful, but his “child-brain” is entirely at the service of his appetites,the primitive hungers that civilization to maintain itself must deny. That is how he appears to others, but Dracula cannot see himself, for no mirror willcontain his image. Dracula is already a reflection , a shadow, an apparition, a matter ofmind rather than matter - and in any case, when we look for him in mirrors, our ownfaces get in the way. Nor can the light of day illuminate his murks, for until nightfall helikes to lie dormant in his coffin. “I love the shade and the shadow,” he says. That heromps subject to his command, kindredwilled him to will you to do. That is how he appears to others, but Dracula cannot see himself, for no mirror willcontain his image. Dracula is already a reflection , a shadow, an apparition, a matter ofmind rather than matter - and in any case, when we look for him in mirrors, our ownfaces get in the way. Nor can the light of day illuminate his murks, for until nightfall helikes to lie dormant in his coffin. “I love the shade and the shadow,” he says. His oppo-nent and opposite and alter ego, Dr. Abraham van Helsing, notes that Dracula’s “powerceases, as that of all evil things, at the coming of the day.” It is while respectable citi-zens rest dreaming in their beads that he romps among creatures subject to his com-mand and kindred to his spirit - wolves, bats, owls, rats, and mice - nocturnal predatorsor nocturnal invaders of our sheltering homes. Their forms are his to take on when hewill, and he can materialize out of mists, dust motes, moonbeams, out of whatever ourspellbound imaginations have at hand to work over. But he cannot cross any thresholdor any windowsill without an invitation from someone within who is responsive to hissuit. Once you let him in, he will hypnotize you, thus making it all the easier for you to dowhat you have willed him to will you to do. George Stade VII
  13. 13. w l Forewordt he little-known author of one of the most famous novels in literature, was overshadowed both by his mentor, the actor Sir Henry Irving, and by his cre- ation, the infamous Count Dracula. Born in Dublin on November 8, 1847, he was named after his father, Abra- ham, a civil servant in Dublin Castle. Bram was a sickly child whose mother entertained him with ghoulish tales and legends. At Trinity College, perhaps to compensate for his boyhood invalidism, Stoker became a champion track athlete and an honor student. In 1870 he took a monotonous civil service jobbut soon after found creative work as an unpaid drama critic for the Dublin Mail. In 1876he met Henry Irving, whose dramatic powers impressed him greatly; he became theactor’s tireless manager, adviser and travel companion for the next twenty-seven years,throughout the triumphs and ultimate downfall of London’s Lyceum Theatre. During thistime Stoker also found time to write and to earn a law degree as well.It was his intense interest in vampires and horror that led Stoker to write Dracula(1897). In all he wrote seventeen books, mostly tales of terror, including The Lady of theShroud (1909), and The Lair of the White Worm (1911). Critics unanimously agree thatDracula is his greatest achievement. In 1905 Irving’s death left Stoker bereft and almost penniless, and prompted a severstroke that robbed him of his sight for a number of months. He never fully recovered. In1908 Stoker wrote a series of bizarre and vindictive articles for Ninteenth Century maga-zine advocating censorship of eroticism in fiction - a curious idea since Dracula is unde-niably full of erotic implications. His biographers have suggested that beneath Stoker’samiable exterior he was a tormented man who feared his own dark obsessions. BramStoker died in 1912. His book was destined to be immortalized in hundreds of plays andfilms, few of which are truly faithful to the original. The little-known author of one of the most famous novels in literature, was overshad-VIII
  14. 14. Draculaowed both by his mentor, the actor Sir Henry Irving, and by his creation, the infamousCount Dracula. Born in Dublin on November 8, 1847, he was named after his father, Abraham, a civilservant in Dublin Castle. Bram was a sickly child whose mother entertained him withghoulish tales and legends. At Trinity College, perhaps to compensate for his boyhoodinvalidism, Stoker became a champion track athlete and an honor student. In 1870 hetook a monotonous civil service job but soon after found creative work as an unpaiddrama critic for the Dublin Mail. In 1876 he met Henry Irving, whose dramatic powersimpressed him greatly; he became the actor’s tireless manager, adviser and travel com-panion for the next twenty-seven years, throughout the triumphs and ultimate downfallof London’s Lyceum Theatre. During this time Stoker also found time to write and toearn a law degree as well. It was his intense interest in vampires and horror that led Stoker to write Dracula(1897). In all he wrote seventeen books, mostly tales of terror, including The Lady of theShroud (1909), and The Lair of the White Worm Born in Dublin on November 8, 1847, he was named after his father, Abraham, a civilservant in Dublin Castle. Bram was a sickly child whose mother entertained him withghoulish tales and legends. At Trinity College, perhaps to compensate for his boyhoodinvalidism, Stoker became a champion track athlete and an honor student. In 1870 hetook a monotonous civil service job but soon after found creative work as an unpaiddrama critic for the Dublin Mail. In 1876 he met Henry Irving, whose dramatic powersimpressed him greatly; he became the actor’s tireless manager, adviser and travel com-panion for the next twenty-seven years, throughout the triumphs and ultimate downfallof London’s Lyceum Theatre. During this time Stoker also found time to write and toearn a law degree as well. It was his intense interest in vampires and horror that led Stoker to write Dracula(1897). In all he wrote seventeen books, mostly tales of terror, including The Lady of theShroud (1909), and The Lair of the White Worm IX
  15. 15. vPreface 0h ow these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the reading of them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variance with the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no statement of past things wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary, given from the standpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be mademanifest in the reading of them. All needless matters have been eliminated, sothat a history almost at variance with the possibilities of later-day belief maystand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no statement of past things where-in memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary, givenfrom the standpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the reading ofthem. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variance with thepossibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no state-ment of past things wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contempo-rary, given from the standpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the reading ofthem. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variance with thepossibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no state-ment of past things wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contempo-rary, given from the standpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the reading ofthem. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at variance with thepossibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no state-X
  16. 16. Draculament of past things wherein memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contempo-rary, given from the standpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the read-ing of them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at vari-ance with the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There isthroughout no statement of past things wherein memory may err, for all the recordschosen are exactly contemporary, given from the standpoints and within the rangeof knowledge of those who made them.How these papers have been placed in se-quence will be made manifest in the reading of them. All needless matters have beeneliminated, so that a history almost at variance with the possibilities of later-day be-lief may stand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no statement of past thingswherein memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary, givenfrom the standpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. How these papers have been placed in sequence will be made manifest in the read-ing of them. All needless matters have been eliminated, so that a history almost at vari-ance with the possibilities of later-day belief may stand forth as simple fact. There isthroughout no statement of past things wherein memory may err, for all the recordschosen are exactly contemporary, given from the standpoints and within the rangeof knowledge of those who made them.ow these papers have been placed in se-quence will be made manifest in the reading of them. All needless matters have beeneliminated, so that a history almost at variance with the possibilities of later-day be-lief may stand forth as simple fact. There is throughout no statement of past thingswherein memory may err, for all the records chosen are exactly contemporary, givenfrom the standpoints and within the range of knowledge of those who made them. XI
  17. 17. XII
  18. 18. 2 Dracula Prologue z Anonymous Journal, Incomplete (Recovered from shipwreck, 4 April)a ttached here is a full account of all the events that took place between 3 May 1725 and 17 Sept 1726 in which I and a band of other chroniclers descend into the forest surroundedthe fabled Castle Dracula to investigate the annual appearances of magical blue flames correlating to the disap- pearances of children every Eve of All Souls. I left Munich at 8:35 P.M., on 1st May, arriving at Vienna early next morning; should have arrived at 6:46, but train was an hour late. Buda-Pesth seems a wonderful place, from the glimpse which I got of it from the train and the little I could walk throughthe streets. I feared to go very far from the station, as we had arrived late and wouldstart as near the correct time as possible. The impression I had was that we were leavingthe West and entering the East; the most western of splendid bridges over the Danube,which is here of noble width and depth, took us among the traditions of Turkish rule. Weleft in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh. Here I stopped for thenight at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner or rather supper, a chicken done up some waywith red pepper, which was very good. but thirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.) I askedthe waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that, as it was a national dish, Ishould be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians.I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I should beable to get on without it.I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exact lo-cality of the Castle Dracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to compare withour own Ordnance Survey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named by CountDracula, is a fairly well-known place. I shall enter here some of my notes, as they may 1
  19. 19. 5 Chapter 1 Jonathan Harkers Journal w (Kept in shorthand) 3 May, Bistritzl eft Munich at 8:35 P.M., on 1st May, arriving at Vienna early next morning; should have arrived at 6:46, but train was an hour late. Buda-Pesth seems a wonderful place, from the glimpse which I got of it from the train and the little I could walk through the streets. I feared to go very far from the station, as we had arrived late and would start as near the correct time as possible. The impression I had was that we were leaving the West and entering the East; the most western of splendid bridges over the Danube, which is here of noble width and depth, took us among the traditions of Turkish rule. We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh. Here I stoppedfor the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, a chicken done upsome way with red pepper, which was very good but thirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.)I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that, as it was a nation-al dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians. I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I shouldbe able to get on without it.I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exactlocality of the Castle Dracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to comparewith our own Ordnance Survey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named byCount Dracula, is a fairly well-known place.shall enter here some of my notes, as theymay refresh my memory when I talk over my travels with Mina.We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfallto Klausenburgh. Here I stopped for the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, orrather supper, a chicken done up some way with red pepper, which was very good but2
  20. 20. Draculathirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.) I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprikahendl,” and that, as it was a national dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along theCarpathians. I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I shouldbe able to get on without it. I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exact locality of the CastleDracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to compare with our own OrdnanceSurvey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named by Count Dracula, is a fairlywell-known place. We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh. Here I stoppedfor the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, a chicken done upsome way with red pepper, which was very good but thirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.)I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that, as it was a nation-al dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians. I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I shouldbe able to get on without it. I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exact locality of the CastleDracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to compare with our own OrdnanceSurvey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named by Count Dracula, is a fairlywell-known place.We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh.Here I stopped for the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, achicken done up some way with red pepper, which was very good but thirsty. (Mem. getrecipe for Mina.) I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that,as it was a national dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians. I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I shouldbe able to get on without it. I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exactlocality of the Castle Dracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to comparewith our own Ordnance Survey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named byCount Dracula, is a fairly well-known place.I found my smattering of German very use-ful here, indeed, I don’t know how I should be able to get on without it. I was not ableto light on any map or work giving the exact locality of the Castle Dracula, as there areno maps of this country as yet to compare with our own Ordnance Survey Maps; but Ifound that Bistritz, the post town named by Count Dracula, is a fairly well-known place. 3
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  22. 22. Jonathan Harkers Journal Without a word he shook his reins, the horses turned, and we swept into the dark-ness of the pass. As I looked back I saw the steam from the horses of the coach by thelight of the lamps, and projected against it the figures of my late companions crossingthemselves. Then the driver cracked his whip and called to his horses, and off they swept on theirway to Bukovina. As they sank into the darkness I felt a strange chill, and a lonely feelingcome over me. But a cloak was thrown over my shoulders, and a rug across my knees,and the driver said in excellent German--”The night is chill, mein Herr, and my masterthe Count bade me take all care of you. There is a flask of slivovitz (the plum brandy ofthe country) underneath the seat, if you should require it.” I did not take any, but it was a comfort to know it was there all the same. I felt a littlestrangely, and not a little frightened. I think had there been any alternative I should havetaken it, instead of prosecuting that unknown night journey. The carriage went at a hardpace straight along, then we made a complete turn and went along another straightroad. It seemed to me that we were simply going over and over the same ground again,and so I took note of some salient point, and found that this was so. I would have likedto have asked the driver what this all meant, but I really feared to do so, for I thoughtthat, placed as I was, any protest would have had no effect in case there had been anintention to delay. By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time was passing, I struck a match,and by its flame looked at my watch. It was within a few minutes of midnight. This gaveme a sort of shock, for I suppose the general superstition about midnight was increasedby my recent experiences. By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time waspassing, I struck a match, and by its flame looked at my watch. It was within a few min-utes of midnight. This gave me a sort of shock, for I suppose the general superstitionabout midnight was increased by my recent experiences. By-and-by, however, as I wascurious to know how time was passing, I struck a match, and by its flame looked at mywatch. It was within a few minutes of midnight. This gave me a sort of shock, for I sup-pose the general superstition about midnight was increased by my recent experiences.By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time was passing, I struck a match,and by its flame looked at my watch. It was within a few minutes of midnight. This gaveme a sort of shock, for I suppose the general superstition about midnight was increasedby my recent experiences. By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time was 5
  23. 23. Dracula Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long, ago-nized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and then anotherand another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, a wildhowling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imagina-tion could grasp it through the gloom of the night. At the first howl the horses began to strain and rear, but the driver spoke to themsoothingly, and they quieted down, but shivered and sweated as though after a runawayfrom sudden fright. Then, far off in the distance, from the mountains on each side of usbegan a louder and a sharper howling, that of wolves, which affected both the horsesand myself in the same way. For I was minded to jump from the caleche and run, whilstthey reared again and plunged madly, so that the driver had to use all his great strengthto keep them from bolting. In a few minutes, however, my own ears got accustomed tothe sound, and the horses so far became quiet that the driver was able to descend andto stand before them. He petted and soothed them, and whispered something in their ears, as I have heardof horse-tamers doing, and with extraordinary effect, for under his caresses they becamequite manageable again, though they still trembled. The driver again took his seat, andshaking his reins, started off at a great pace. This time, after going to the far side of thePass, he suddenly turned down a narrow roadway which ran sharply to the right. Soon we were hemmed in with trees, which in places arched right over the roadwaytill we passed as through a tunnel. And again great frowning rocks guarded us boldly oneither side. Though we were in shelter, we could hear the rising wind, for it moaned andwhistled through the rocks, and the branches of the trees crashed together as we sweptalong. It grew colder and colder still, and fine, powdery snow began to fall, so that soonwe and all around us were covered with a white blanket. The keen wind still carried thehowling of the dogs, though this grew fainter as we went on our way. The baying of thewolves sounded nearer and nearer, as though they were closing round on us from everyside. I grew dreadfully afraid, and the horses shared my fear. The driver, however, wasnot in the least disturbed. He kept turning his head to left and right, but I could not seeanything through the darkness. Suddenly, away on our left I saw a faint flickering blue flame. The driver saw it at thesame moment. He at once checked the horses, and, jumping to the ground, disappearedinto the darkness. I did not know what to do, the less as the howling of the wolves grew6
  24. 24. Jonathan Harkers Journalcloser. But while I wondered, the driver suddenly appeared again, and without a wordtook his seat, and we resumed our journey. I think I must have fallen asleep and keptdreaming of the incident, for it seemed to be repeated endlessly, and now looking back,it is like a sort of awful nightmare. Once the flame appeared so near the road, that evenin the darkness around us I could watch the driver’s motions. He went rapidly to wherethe blue flame arose, it must have been very faint, for it did not seem to illumine theplace around it at all, and gathering a few stones, formed them into some device. Once there appeared a strange optical effect. When he stood between me and theflame he did not obstruct it, for I could see its ghostly flicker all the same. This startledme, but as the effect was only momentary, I took it that my eyes deceived me strainingthrough the darkness. Then for a time there were no blue flames, and we sped onwardsthrough the gloom, with the howling of the wolves around us, as though they were fol-lowing in a moving circle. At last there came a time when the driver went further afield than he had yet gone,and during his absence, the horses began to tremble worse than ever and to snort andscream with fright. I could not see any cause for it, for the howling of the wolves hadceased altogether. But just then the moon, sailing through the black clouds, appearedbehind the jagged crest of a beetling, pine-clad rock, and by its light I saw around us aring of wolves, with white teeth and lolling red tongues, with long, sinewy limbs andshaggy hair. They were a hundred times more terrible in the grim silence which heldthem than even when they howled. For myself, I felt a sort of paralysis of fear. It is onlywhen a man feels himself face to face with such horrors that he can understand theirtrue import. All at once the wolves began to howl as though the moonlight had had some pecu-liar effect on them. The horses jumped about and reared, and looked helplessly roundwith eyes that rolled in a way painful to see. But the living ring of terror encompassedthem on every side, and they had perforce to remain within it. I called to the coachmanto come, for it seemed to me that our only chance was to try to break out through thering and to aid his approach, I shouted and beat the side of the caleche, hoping by thenoise to scare the wolves from the side, so as to give him a chance of reaching the trap.How he camethere, I know not, but I heard his voice raised in a tone of imperious com-mand, and looking towards the sound, saw him stand in the roadway. As he swept hislong arms, as though brushing aside some impalpable obstacle, the wolves fell back and 7
  25. 25. z Chapter 3 l Jonathan Harkers Journal (Continued)W hen I found that I was a prisoner a sort of wild feeling came over me. I rushed up and down the stairs, trying every door and peering out of every window I could find, but after a little the conviction of my help- lessness overpowered all other feelings. When I look back after a few hours I think I must have been mad for the time, for I behaved much as a rat does in a trap. When, however, the conviction had come to me that I was helpless I sat down quietly, as quietly as I have ever done anything in my life, and began to think over what was best to be done.I am thinking still, and as yet have come to no definite conclusion. Of one thing only amI certain. That it is no use making my ideas known to the Count. He knows well that Iam imprisoned, and as he has done it himself, and has doubtless his own motives forit, he would only deceive me if I trusted him fully with the facts. So far as I can see, myonly plan will be to keep my knowledge and my fears to myself, and my eyes open. I am,I know, either being deceived, like a baby, by my own fears, or else I am in desperatestraits, and if the latter be so, I need, and shall need, all my brains to get through. The impression I had was that we were leaving the West and entering the East; themost western of splendid bridges over the Danube, which is here of noble width anddepth, took us among the traditions of Turkish rule. We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh. Here I stoppedfor the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, a chicken done upsome way with red pepper, which was very good but thirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.)I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that, as it was a nation-8
  26. 26. Draculaal dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians. I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I shouldbe able to get on without it. I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exact locality of the CastleDracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to compare with our own OrdnanceSurvey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named by Count Dracula, is a fairlywell-known place. I shall enter here some of my notes, as they may refresh my memorywhen I talk over my travels with Mina. In the population of Transylvania there are four distinct nationalities: Saxons in theSouth, and mixed with them the Wallachs, who are the descendants of the Dacians;Magyars in the West, and Szekelys in the East and North. I am going among the latter,who claim to be descended from Attila and the Huns. This may be so, for when the Mag-yars conquered the country in the eleventh century they found the Huns settled in it. I read that every known superstition in the world is gathered into the horseshoe ofthe Carpathians, as if it were the centre of some sort of imaginative whirlpool; if so mystay may be very interesting. (Mem., I must ask the Count all about them.) I did not sleep well, though my bed was comfortable enough, for I had all sorts ofqueer dreams. There was a dog howling all night under my window, which may havehad something to do with it; or it may have been the paprika, for I had to drink up all thewater in my carafe, and was still thirsty. Towards morning I slept and was wakened bythe continuous knocking at my door, so I guess I must have been sleeping soundly then. I had for breakfast more paprika, and a sort of porridge of maize flour which theysaid was “mamaliga”, and egg-plant stuffed with forcemeat, a very excellent dish, whichthey call “impletata”. (Mem., get recipe for this also.) I had to hurry breakfast, for thetrain started a little before eight, or rather it ought to have done so, for after rushing tothe station at 7:30 I had to sit in the carriage for more than an hour before we began tomove. It seems to me that the further east you go the more unpunctual are the trains.What ought they to be in China? All day long we seemed to dawdle through a countrywhich was full of beauty of every kind. Sometimes we saw little towns or castles on thetop of steep hills such as we see in old missals; sometimes we ran by rivers and streams which seemed from the wide stony margin on each 9
  27. 27. Dracula Without a word he shook his reins, the horses turned, and we swept into the dark-ness of the pass. As I looked back I saw the steam from the horses of the coach by thelight of the lamps, and projected against it the figures of my late companions crossingthemselves. Then the driver cracked his whip and called to his horses, and off they swept on theirway to Bukovina. As they sank into the darkness I felt a strange chill, and a lonely feelingcome over me. But a cloak was thrown over my shoulders, and a rug across my knees,and the driver said in excellent German--”The night is chill, mein Herr, and my masterthe Count bade me take all care of you. There is a flask of slivovitz (the plum brandy ofthe country) underneath the seat, if you should require it.” I did not take any, but it was a comfort to know it was there all the same. I felt a littlestrangely, and not a little frightened. I think had there been any alternative I should havetaken it, instead of prosecuting that unknown night journey. The carriage went at a hardpace straight along, then we made a complete turn and went along another straightroad. It seemed to me that we were simply going over and over the same ground again,and so I took note of some salient point, and found that this was so. I would have likedto have asked the driver what this all meant, but I really feared to do so, for I thoughtthat, placed as I was, any protest would have had no effect in case there had been anintention to delay. By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time was passing, I struck a match,and by its flame looked at my watch. It was within a few minutes of midnight. This gaveme a sort of shock, for I suppose the general superstition about midnight was increasedby my recent experiences. I waited with a sick feeling of suspense. Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long, ago-nized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and then anotherand another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, a wildhowling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imagina-tion could grasp it through the gloom of the night. At the first howl the horses began to strain and rear, but the driver spoke to themsooth. Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long,agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and thenanother and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, awild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imag-10
  28. 28. 11
  29. 29. Draculaingly, and they quieted down, but shivered and sweated as though after a runaway fromsudden fright. Then, far off in the distance, from the mountains on each side of us be-gan a louder and a sharper howling, that of wolves, which affected both the horses andmyself in the same way. For I was minded to jump from the caleche and run, whilst theyreared again and plunged madly, so that the driver had to use all his great strength tokeep them from bolting. In a few minutes, however, my own ears got accustomed to thesound, and the horses so far became quiet that the driver was able to descend and tostand before them. He petted and soothed them, and whispered something in their ears, as I have heardof horse-tamers doing, and with extraordinary effect, for under his caresses they becamequite manageable again, though they still trembled. The driver again took his seat, andshaking his reins, started off at a great pace. This time, after going to the far side of thePass, he suddenly turned down a narrow roadway which ran sharply to the right. Soonwe were hemmed in with trees, which in places arched right over the roadway till wepassed as through a tunnel. And again great frowning rocks guarded us boldly on ei-ther side. Though we were in shelter, we could hear the rising wind, for it moaned andwhistled through the rocks, and the branches of the trees crashed together as we sweptalong. It grew colder and colder still, and fine, powdery snow began to fall, so that soonwe and all around us were covered with a white blanket. The keen wind still carried thehowling of the dogs, though this grew fainter as we went on our way. The baying of thewolves sounded nearer and nearer, as though they were closing round on us from everyside. I grew dreadfully afraid, and the horses shared my fear. The driver, however, wasnot in the least disturbed. He kept turning his head to left and right, but I could not seeanything through the darkness. Suddenly, away on our left I saw a faint flickering blue flame. The driver saw it at thesame moment. He at once checked the horses, and, jumping to the ground, disappearedinto the darkness. I did not know what to do, the less as the howling of the wolves grewcloser. But while I wondered, the driver suddenly appeared again, and without a wordtook his seat, and we resumed our journey. I think I must have fallen asleep and keptdreaming of the incident, for it seemed to be repeated endlessly, and now looking back,it is like a sort of awful nightmare. Once the flame appeared so near the road, that evenin the darkness around us I could watch the driver’s motions. He went rapidly to wherethe blue flame arose, it must have been very faint, for it did not seem to illumine the12
  30. 30. Jonathan Harkers Journalplace around it at all, and gathering a few stones, formed them into some device. Once there appeared a strange optical effect. When he stood between me and theflame he did not obstruct it, for I could see its ghostly flicker all the same. This startledme, but as the effect was only momentary, I took it that my eyes deceived me strainingthrough the darkness. Then for a time there were no blue flames, and we sped onwardsthrough the gloom, with the howling of the wolves around us, as though they were fol-lowing in a moving circle. At last there came a time when the driver went further afield than he had yet gone,and during his absence, the horses began to tremble worse than ever and to snort andscream with fright. I could not see any cause for it, for the howling of the wolves hadceased altogether. But just then the moon, sailing through the black clouds, appearedbehind the jagged crest of a beetling, pine-clad rock, and by its light I saw around us aring of wolves, with white teeth and lolling red tongues, with long, sinewy limbs andshaggy hair. They were a hundred times more terrible in the grim silence which heldthem than even when they howled. For myself, I felt a sort of paralysis of fear. It is onlywhen a man feels himself face to face with such horrors that he can understand theirtrue import. All at once the wolves began to howl as though the moonlight had had some pecu-liar effect on them. The horses jumped about and reared, and looked helplessly roundwith eyes that rolled in a way painful to see. But the living ring of terror encompassedthem on every side, and they had perforce to remain within it. I called to the coachmanto come, for it seemed to me that our only chance was to try to break out through thering and to aid his approach, I shouted and beat the side of the caleche, hoping by thenoise to scare the wolves from the side, so as to give him a chance of reaching the trap.How he came there, I know not, but I heard his voice raised in a tone of imperious com-mand, and looking towards the sound, saw him stand in the roadway. As he swept hislong arms, as though brushing aside some impalpable obstacle, the wolves fell back andback further still. Just then a heavy cloud passed across the face of the moon, so thatwe were again in darkness. When I could see again the driver was climbing into the caleche, and the wolves dis-appeared. This was all so strange and uncanny that a dreadful fear came upon me, andI was afraid to speak or move. The time seemed interminable as we swept on our way,now in almost complete darkness, for the rolling clouds obscured the moon. 13
  31. 31. 5 l Dracula Chapter 4 Jonathan Harkers Journal (Continued)i awoke in my own bed. If it be that I had not dreamt, the Count must have carried me here. I tried to satisfy myself on the subject, but could not arrive at any unques- tionable result. To be sure, there were certain small evidences, such as that my clothes were folded and laid by in a manner which was not my habit. My watch was still unwound, and I am rigorously accustomed to wind it the last thing before go- ing to bed, and many such details. But these things are no proof, for they may have been evidences that my mind was not as usual, and, for some cause or another, I had certainly been much upset. I must watch for proof. Of one thing I am glad. Ifit was that the Count carried me here and undressed me, he must have been hurried inhis task, for my pockets are intact. I am sure this diary would have been a mystery tohim which he would not have brooked. He would have taken or destroyed it. As I lookround this room, although it has been to me so full of fear, it is now a sort of sanctuary,for nothing can be more dreadful than those awful women, who were, who are, waitingto suck my blood. The impression I had was that we were leaving the West and entering the East; themost western of splendid bridges over the Danube, which is here of noble width anddepth, took us among the traditions of Turkish rule. We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh. Here I stoppedfor the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, a chicken done upsome way with red pepper, which was very good but thirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.)I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that, as it was a nation-al dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians.14
  32. 32. Jonathan Harkers Journal I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I shouldbe able to get on without it. I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exact locality of the CastleDracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to compare with our own OrdnanceSurvey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named by Count Dracula, is a fairlywell-known place. I shall enter here some of my notes, as they may refresh my memorywhen I talk over my travels with Mina. In the population of Transylvania there are four dis-tinct nationalities: Saxons in the South, and mixed with them the Wallachs, who are thedescendants of the Dacians; Magyars in the West, and Szekelys in the East and North. Iam going among the latter, who claim to be descended from Attila and the Huns. Thismay be so, for when the Magyars conquered the country in the eleventh century theyfound the Huns settled in it. I read that every known superstition in the world is gathered into the horseshoe ofthe Carpathians, as if it were the centre of some sort of imaginative whirlpool; if so mystay may be very interesting. (Mem., I must ask the Count all about them.)I did not sleepwell, though my bed was comfortable enough, for I had all sorts of queer dreams. Therewas a dog howling all night under my window, which may have had something to dowith it; or it may have been the paprika, for I had to drink up all the water in my carafe,and was still thirsty. Towards morning I slept and was wakened by the continuous knock-ing at my door, so I guess I must have been sleeping soundly then. I had for breakfast more paprika, and a sort of porridge of maize flour which they saidwas “mamaliga”, and egg-plant stuffed with forcemeat, a very excellent dish, which theycall “impletata”. (Mem., get recipe for this also.) I had to hurry breakfast, for the train started a little before eight, or rather it ought tohave done so, for after rushing to the station at 7:30 I had to sit in the carriage for morethan an hour before we began to move.It seems to me that the further east you go themore unpunctual are the trains. What ought they to be in China? All day long we seemed to dawdle through a country which was full of beauty ofevery kind. Sometimes we saw little towns or castles on the top of steep hills such as wesee in old missals; sometimes we ran by rivers and streams which seemed from the widestony margin on each side of them to be subject to great floods. It takes a lot of water,and running strong, to sweep the outside edge of a river clear. 15
  33. 33. 16
  34. 34. Jonathan Harkers JournalWithout a word he shook his reins, the horses turned, and we swept into the darknessof the pass. As I looked back I saw the steam from the horses of the coach by the lightof the lamps, and projected against it the figures of my late companions crossing them-selves. Then the driver cracked his whip and called to his horses, and off they swept on theirway to Bukovina. As they sank into the darkness I felt a strange chill, and a lonely feelingcome over me. But a cloak was thrown over my shoulders, and a rug across my knees,and the driver said in excellent German--”The night is chill, mein Herr, and my masterthe Count bade me take all care of you. There is a flask of slivovitz (the plum brandy ofthe country) underneath the seat, if you should require it.” I did not take any, but it wasa comfort to know it was there all the same. I felt a little strangely, and not a little fright-ened. I think had there been any alternative I should have taken it, instead of prosecut-ing that unknown night journey. The carriage went at a hard pace straight along, thenwe made a complete turn and went along another straight road. It seemed to me thatwe were simply going over and over the same ground again, and so I took note of somesalient point, and found that this was so. I would have liked to have asked the driverwhat this all meant, but I really feared to do so, for I thought that, placed as I was, anyprotest would have had no effect in case there had been an intention to delay. By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time was passing, I struck a match,and by its flame looked at my watch. It was within a few minutes of midnight. This gaveme a sort of shock, for I suppose the general superstition about midnight was increasedby my recent experiences. I waited with a sick feeling of suspense. Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long,agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and thenanother and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass,a wild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as theimagination could grasp it through the gloom of the night. Then a dog began to howlsomewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long, agonized wailing, as if from fear.The sound was taken up by another dog, and then another and another, till, borne onthe wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, a wild howling began, which seemedto come from all over the country, as far as the imagination could grasp it through thegloom of the night. Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down theroad, a long, agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, 17
  35. 35. Draculaingly, and they quieted down, but shivered and sweated as though after a runaway fromsudden fright. Then, far off in the distance, from the mountains on each side of us be-gan a louder and a sharper howling, that of wolves, which affected both the horses andmyself in the same way. For I was minded to jump from the caleche and run, whilst theyreared again and plunged madly, so that the driver had to use all his great strength tokeep them from bolting. In a few minutes, however, my own ears got accustomed to thesound, and the horses so far became quiet that the driver was able to descend and tostand before them. He petted and soothed them, and whispered something in their ears, as I have heardof horse-tamers doing, and with extraordinary effect, for under his caresses they becamequite manageable again, though they still trembled. The driver again took his seat, andshaking his reins, started off at a great pace. This time, after going to the far side of thePass, he suddenly turned down a narrow roadway which ran sharply to the right. Soon we were hemmed in with trees, which in places arched right over the roadwaytill we passed as through a tunnel. And again great frowning rocks guarded us boldly oneither side. Though we were in shelter, we could hear the rising wind, for it moaned andwhistled through the rocks, and the branches of the trees crashed together as we sweptalong. It grew colder and colder still, and fine, powdery snow began to fall, so that soonwe and all around us were covered with a white blanket. The keen wind still carried thehowling of the dogs, though this grew fainter as we went on our way. The baying of thewolves sounded nearer and nearer, as though they were closing round on us from everyside. I grew dreadfully afraid, and the horses shared my fear. The driver, however, wasnot in the least disturbed. He kept turning his head to left and right, but I could not seeanything through the darkness. Suddenly, away on our left I saw a faint flickering blue flame. The driver saw it at thesame moment. He at once checked the horses, and, jumping to the ground, disappearedinto the darkness. I did not know what to do, the less as the howling of the wolves grewcloser. But while I wondered, the driver suddenly appeared again, and without a wordtook his seat, and we resumed our journey. I think I must have fallen asleep and keptdreaming of the incident, for it seemed to be repeated endlessly, and now looking back,it is like a sort of awful nightmare. Once the flame appeared so near the road, that evenin the darkness around us I could watch the driver’s motions. He went rapidly to wherethe blue flame arose, it must have been very faint, for it did not seem to illumine the18
  36. 36. Jonathan Harkers Journalplace around it at all, and gathering a few stones, formed them into some device. Once there appeared a strange optical effect. When he stood between me and theflame he did not obstruct it, for I could see its ghostly flicker all the same. This startledme, but as the effect was only momentary, I took it that my eyes deceived me strainingthrough the darkness. Then for a time there were no blue flames, and we sped onwardsthrough the gloom, with the howling of the wolves around us, as though they were fol-lowing in a moving circle. At last there came a time when the driver went further afield than he had yet gone,and during his absence, the horses began to tremble worse than ever and to snort andscream with fright. I could not see any cause for it, for the howling of the wolves hadceased altogether. But just then the moon, sailing through the black clouds, appearedbehind the jagged crest of a beetling, pine-clad rock, and by its light I saw around us aring of wolves, with white teeth and lolling red tongues, with long, sinewy limbs andshaggy hair. They were a hundred times more terrible in the grim silence which heldthem than even when they howled. For myself, I felt a sort of paralysis of fear. It is onlywhen a man feels himself face to face with such horrors that he can understand theirtrue import. All at once the wolves began to howl as though the moonlight had had some pecu-liar effect on them. The horses jumped about and reared, and looked helplessly roundwith eyes that rolled in a way painful to see. But the living ring of terror encompassedthem on every side, and they had perforce to remain within it. I called to the coachmanto come, for it seemed to me that our only chance was to try to break out through thering and to aid his approach, I shouted and beat the side of the caleche, hoping by thenoise to scare the wolves from the side, so as to give him a chance of reaching the trap.How he came there, I know not, but I heard his voice raised in a tone of imperious com-mand, and looking towards the sound, saw him stand in the roadway. As he swept hislong arms, as though brushing aside some impalpable obstacle, the wolves fell back andback further still. Just then a heavy cloud passed across the face of the moon, so thatwe were again in darkness. When I could see again the driver was climbing into the caleche, and the wolves dis-appeared. This was all so strange and uncanny that a dreadful fear came upon me, andI was afraid to speak or move. The time seemed interminable as we swept on our way,now in almost complete darkness, for the rolling clouds obscured the moon. 19
  37. 37. z Chapter 7 z Cutting from "The Dailygraph", 8 August (Pasted in Mina Murrays Journal)f rom a correspondent. Whitby. One of the greatest and suddenest storms on record has just been experienced here, with results both strange and unique. The weather had been somewhat sultry, but not to any degree uncommon in the month of August. Saturday evening was as fine as was ever known, and the great body of holiday-makers laid out yesterday for visits to Mulgrave Woods, Robin Hood’s Bay, Rig Mill, Runswick, Staithes, and the various trips in the neighborhood of Whitby. The steamers Emma and Scarborough made trips up and down the coast, andthere was an unusual amount of ‘tripping’ both to and from Whitby. The day was un-usually fine till the afternoon, when some of the gossips who frequent the East Cliffchurchyard, and from the commanding eminence watch the wide sweep of sea visibleto the north and east, called attention to a sudden show of ‘mares tails’ high in the skyto the northwest. The wind was then blowing from the south-west in the mild degreewhich in barometrical language is ranked ‘No. 2, light breeze.’ The coastguard on duty at once made report, and one old fisherman, who for morethan half a century has kept watch on weather signs from the East Cliff, foretold in anemphatic manner the coming of a sudden storm. The approach of sunset was so verybeautiful, so grand in its masses of splendidly coloured clouds, that there was quite anassemblage on the walk along the cliff in the old churchyard to enjoy the beauty. Be-fore the sun dipped below the black mass of Kettleness, standing boldly athwart thewestern sky, its downward way was marked by myriad clouds of every sunset colour,flame, purple, pink, green, violet, and all the tints of gold, with here and there masses20
  38. 38. Draculanot large, but of seemingly absolute blackness, in all sorts of shapes, as well outlined ascolossal silhouettes. The experience was not lost on the painters, and doubtless some ofthe sketches of the ‘Prelude to the Great Storm’ will grace the R. A and R. I. walls in Maynext. More than one captain made up his mind then and there that his ‘cobble’ or his‘mule’, as they term the different classes of boats, would remain in the harbour till thestorm had passed. The wind fell away entirely during the evening, and at midnight therewas a dead calm, a sultry heat, and that prevailing intensity which, on the approach ofthunder, affects persons of a sensitive nature. There were but few lights in sight at sea, for even the coasting steamers, which usual-ly hug the shore so closely, kept well to seaward, and but few fishing boats were in sight.The only sail noticeable was a foreign schooner with all sails set, which was seeminglygoing westwards. The foolhardiness or ignorance of her officers was a prolific theme forcomment whilst she remained in sight, and efforts were made to signal her to reduce sailin the face of her danger. Before the night shut down she was seen with sails idly flap-ping as she gently rolled on the undulating swell of the sea. “As idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean.” Shortly before ten o’clock the stillness of the air grew quite oppressive, and the si-lence was so marked that the bleating of a sheep inland or the barking of a dog in thetown was distinctly heard, and the band on the pier, with its lively French air, was like adischord in the great harmony of nature’s silence. A little after midnight came a strangesound from over the sea, and high overhead the air began to carry a strange, faint, hol-low booming. Then without warning the tempest broke. With a rapidity which, at the time, seemedincredible, and even afterwards is impossible to realize, the whole aspect of nature atonce became convulsed. The waves rose in growing fury, each over-topping its fellow,till in a very few minutes the lately glassy sea was like a roaring and devouring monster.White-crested waves beat madly on the level sands and rushed up the shelving cliffs.Others broke over the piers, and with their spume swept the lanthorns of the lighthous-es which rise from the end of either pier of Whitby Harbour. The wind roared like thunder, and blew with such force that it waswith difficulty thateven strong men kept their feet, or clung with grim clasp to the iron stanchions. It wasfound necessary to clear the entire pier from the mass of onlookers, or else the fatalities 21
  39. 39. Dracula Without a word he shook his reins, the horses turned, and we swept into the dark-ness of the pass. As I looked back I saw the steam from the horses of the coach by thelight of the lamps, and projected against it the figures of my late companions cross-ing themselves. Then the driver cracked his whip and called to his horses, and off theyswept on their way to Bukovina. As they sank into the darkness I felt a strange chill, anda lonely feeling come over me. But a cloak was thrown over my shoulders, and a rugacross my knees, and the driver said in excellent German--”The night is chill, mein Herr,and my master the Count bade me take all care of you. There is a flask of slivovitz (theplum brandy of the country) underneath the seat, if you should require it.” I did not take any, but it was a comfort to know it was there all the same. I felt a littlestrangely, and not a little frightened. I think had there been any alternative I should havetaken it, instead of prosecuting that unknown night journey. The carriage went at a hardpace straight along, then we made a complete turn and went along another straightroad. It seemed to me that we were simply going over and over the same ground again,and so I took note of some salient point, and found that this was so. I would have likedto have asked the driver what this all meant, but I really feared to do so, for I thoughtthat, placed as I was, any protest would have had no effect in case there had been anintention to delay. By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time was passing, I struck a match,and by its flame looked at my watch. It was within a few minutes of midnight. This gaveme a sort of shock, for I suppose the general superstition about midnight was increasedby my recent experiences. I waited with a sick feeling of suspense. Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long, ago-nized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and then anotherand another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, a wildhowling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imagina-tion could grasp it through the gloom of the night. At the first howl the horses began to strain and rear, but the driver spoke to themsooth. Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long,agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and thenanother and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass,a wild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as theimagination could grasp it through the gloom of the night. Then a dog began to howl22
  40. 40. 23
  41. 41. Dracula Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long,agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and thenanother and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass,a wild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as theimagination could grasp it through the gloom of the nightingly, and they quieted down,but shivered and sweated as though after a runaway from sudden fright. Then, far offin the distance, from the mountains on each side of us began a louder and a sharperhowling, that of wolves, which affected both the horses and myself in the same way. ForI was minded to jump from the caleche and run, whilst they reared again and plungedmadly, so that the driver had to use all his great strength to keep them from bolting. In afew minutes, however, my own ears got accustomed to the sound, and the horses so farbecame quiet that the driver was able to descend and to stand before them. He petted and soothed them, and whispered something in their ears, as I have heardof horse-tamers doing, and with extraordinary effect, for under his caresses they becamequite manageable again, though they still trembled. The driver again took his seat, andshaking his reins, started off at a great pace. This time, after going to the far side of thePass, he suddenly turned down a narrow roadway which ran sharply to the right. Soon we were hemmed in with trees, which in places arched right over the roadwaytill we passed as through a tunnel. And again great frowning rocks guarded us boldly oneither side. Though we were in shelter, we could hear the rising wind, for it moaned andwhistled through the rocks, and the branches of the trees crashed together as we sweptalong. It grew colder and colder still, and fine, powdery snow began to fall, so that soonwe and all around us were covered with a white blanket. The keen wind still carried thehowling of the dogs, though this grew fainter as we went on our way. The baying of thewolves sounded nearer and nearer, as though they were closing round on us from everyside. I grew dreadfully afraid, and the horses shared my fear. The driver, however, wasnot in the least disturbed. He kept turning his head to left and right, but I could not seeanything through the darkness. Suddenly, away on our left I saw a faint flickering blue flame. The driver saw it at thesame moment. He at once checked the horses, and, jumping to the ground, disappearedinto the darkness. I did not know what to do, the less as the howling of the wolves grewcloser. But while I wondered, the driver suddenly appeared again, and without a wordtook his seat, and we resumed our journey. I think I must have fallen asleep and kept24
  42. 42. Cutting from "The Dailygraph"dreaming of the incident, for it seemed to be repeated endlessly, and now looking back,it is like a sort of awful nightmare. Once the flame appeared so near the road, that evenin the darkness around us I could watch the driver’s motions. He went rapidly to wherethe blue flame arose, it must have been very faint, for it did not seem to illumine theplace around it at all, and gathering a few stones, formed them into some device. Once there appeared a strange optical effect. When he stood between me and theflame he did not obstruct it, for I could see its ghostly flicker all the same. This startledme, but as the effect was only momentary, I took it that my eyes deceived me strainingthrough the darkness. Then for a time there were no blue flames, and we sped onwardsthrough the gloom, with the howling of the wolves around us, as though they were fol-lowing in a moving circle. At last there came a time when the driver went further afield than he had yet gone,and during his absence, the horses began to tremble worse than ever and to snort andscream with fright. I could not see any cause for it, for the howling of the wolves hadceased altogether. But just then the moon, sailing through the black clouds, appearedbehind the jagged crest of a beetling, pine-clad rock, and by its light I saw around us aring of wolves, with white teeth and lolling red tongues, with long, sinewy limbs andshaggy hair. They were a hundred times more terrible in the grim silence which heldthem than even when they howled. For myself, I felt a sort of paralysis of fear. It is onlywhen a man feels himself face to face with such horrors that he can understand theirtrue import. All at once the wolves began to howl as though the moonlight had had some pecu-liar effect on them. The horses jumped about and reared, and looked helplessly roundwith eyes that rolled in a way painful to see. But the living ring of terror encompassedthem on every side, and they had perforce to remain within it. I called to the coachmanto come, for it seemed to me that our only chance was to try to break out through thering and to aid his approach, I shouted and beat the side of the caleche, hoping by thenoise to scare the wolves from the side, so as to give him a chance of reaching the trap.How he came there, I know not, but I heard his voice raised in a tone of imperious com-mand, and looking towards the sound, saw him stand in the roadway. As he swept hislong arms, as though brushing aside some impalpable obstacle, the wolves fell back andback further still. Just then a heavy cloud passed across the face of the moon, so thatwe were again in darkness. 25
  43. 43. b w Chapter 8 Mina Murrays Journals ame day, 11:00 p.m. - Oh, but I am tired! If it were not that I had made my diary a duty I should not open it tonight. We had a lovely walk. Lucy, after a while, was in gay spirits, owing, I think, to some dear cows who came nos- ing towards us in aa field close to the lighthouse, and frightened the wits out of us. I believe we forgot everything, except of course, personal fear, and it seemed to wipe the slate clean and give us a fresh start. We had a capital ‘severe tea’ at Robin Hood’s Bay in a sweet little old-fashioned inn, with a bow window right over the seaweed-covered rocks of the strand. I believewe should have shocked the ‘New Woman’ with our appetites. Men are more tolerant,bless them! Then we walked home with some, or rather many, stoppages to rest, andwith our hearts full of a constant dread of wild bulls. Lucy was really tired, and we intended to creep off to bed as soon as we could. Theyoung curate came in, however, and Mrs. Westenra asked him to stay for supper. Lucyand I had both a fight for it with the dusty miller. I know it was a hard fight on my part,and I am quite heroic. I think that some day the bishops must get together and seeabout breeding up a new class of curates, who don’t take supper, no matter how hardthey may be pressed to, and who will know when girls are tired. Lucy was really tired,and we intended to creep off to bed as soon as we could. The young curate came in,however, and Mrs. Westenra asked him to stay for supper. Lucy and I had both a fightfor it with the dusty miller. I know it was a hard fight on my part, and I am quite heroic.I think that some day the bishops must get together and see about breeding up a newclass of curates, who don’t take supper, no matter how hard they may be pressed to, and26
  44. 44. Draculawho will know when girls are tired. Lucy is asleep and breathing softly. She has more colour in her cheeks than usual,and looks, oh so sweet. If Mr. Holmwood fell in love with her seeing her only in thedrawing room, I wonder what he would say if he saw her now. Some of the ‘New Wom-en’ writers will some day start an idea that men and women should be allowed to seeeach other asleep before proposing or accepting. But I suppose the ‘New Woman’ won’tcondescend in future to accept. She will do the proposing herself. And a nice job shewill make of it too! There’s some consolation in that. I am so happy tonight, becausedear Lucy seems better. I really believe she has turned the corner, and that we are overher troubles with dreaming. I should be quite happy if I only knew if Jonathan . . . Godbless and keep him. The impression I had was that we were leaving the West and entering the East; themost western of splendid bridges over the Danube, which is here of noble width anddepth, took us among the traditions of Turkish rule. We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh. Here I stoppedfor the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, a chicken done upsome way with red pepper, which was very good but thirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.)I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that, as it was a nation-al dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians. I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I shouldbe able to get on without it. I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exact locality of the CastleDracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to compare with our own OrdnanceSurvey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named by Count Dracula, is a fairlywell-known place. I shall enter here some of my notes, as they may refresh my memorywhen I talk over my travels with Mina. In the population of Transylvania there are four distinct nationalities: Saxons in theSouth, and mixed with them the Wallachs, who are the descendants of the Dacians;Magyars in the West, and Szekelys in the East and North. I am going among the latter,who claim to be descended from Attila and the Huns. This may be so, for when the Mag-yars conquered the country in the eleventh century they found the Huns settled in it. 27
  45. 45. 28
  46. 46. Mina Murrays Journal Without a word he shook his reins, the horses turned, and we swept into the dark-ness of the pass. As I looked back I saw the steam from the horses of the coach by thelight of the lamps, and projected against it the figures of my late companions crossingthemselves. Then the driver cracked his whip and called to his horses, and off they swept on theirway to Bukovina. As they sank into the darkness I felt a strange chill, and a lonely feelingcome over me. But a cloak was thrown over my shoulders, and a rug across my knees,and the driver said in excellent German--”The night is chill, mein Herr, and my masterthe Count bade me take all care of you. There is a flask of slivovitz (the plum brandy ofthe country) underneath the seat, if you should require it.” I did not take any, but it was a comfort to know it was there all the same. I felt a littlestrangely, and not a little frightened. I think had there been any alternative I should havetaken it, instead of prosecuting that unknown night journey. The carriage went at a hardpace straight along, then we made a complete turn and went along another straightroad. It seemed to me that we were simply going over and over the same ground again,and so I took note of some salient point, and found that this was so. I would have likedto have asked the driver what this all meant, but I really feared to do so, for I thoughtthat, placed as I was, any protest would have had no effect in case there had been anintention to delay. By-and-by, however, as I was curious to know how time was passing, I struck a match,and by its flame looked at my watch. It was within a few minutes of midnight. This gaveme a sort of shock, for I suppose the general superstition about midnight was increasedby my recent experiences. I waited with a sick feeling of suspense. Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long, ago-nized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and then anotherand another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, a wildhowling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imagina-tion could grasp it through the gloom of the night. At the first howl the horses began to strain and rear, but the driver spoke to themsooth. Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long,agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and thenanother and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, awild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imag- 29
  47. 47. Dracula Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long,agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and thenanother and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass,a wild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as theimagination could grasp it through the gloom of the nightingly, and they quieted down,but shivered and sweated as though after a runaway from sudden fright. Then, far offin the distance, from the mountains on each side of us began a louder and a sharperhowling, that of wolves, which affected both the horses and myself in the same way. ForI was minded to jump from the caleche and run, whilst they reared again and plungedmadly, so that the driver had to use all his great strength to keep them from bolting. In afew minutes, however, my own ears got accustomed to the sound, and the horses so farbecame quiet that the driver was able to descend and to stand before them. He petted and soothed them, and whispered something in their ears, as I have heardof horse-tamers doing, and with extraordinary effect, for under his caresses they becamequite manageable again, though they still trembled. The driver again took his seat, andshaking his reins, started off at a great pace. This time, after going to the far side of thePass, he suddenly turned down a narrow roadway which ran sharply to the right. Soon we were hemmed in with trees, which in places arched right over the roadwaytill we passed as through a tunnel. And again great frowning rocks guarded us boldly oneither side. Though we were in shelter, we could hear the rising wind, for it moaned andwhistled through the rocks, and the branches of the trees crashed together as we sweptalong. It grew colder and colder still, and fine, powdery snow began to fall, so that soonwe and all around us were covered with a white blanket. The keen wind still carried thehowling of the dogs, though this grew fainter as we went on our way. The baying of thewolves sounded nearer and nearer, as though they were closing round on us from everyside. I grew dreadfully afraid, and the horses shared my fear. The driver, however, wasnot in the least disturbed. He kept turning his head to left and right, but I could not seeanything through the darkness. Suddenly, away on our left I saw a faint flickering blue flame. The driver saw it at thesame moment. He at once checked the horses, and, jumping to the ground, disappearedinto the darkness. I did not know what to do, the less as the howling of the wolves grewcloser. But while I wondered, the driver suddenly appeared again, and without a wordtook his seat, and we resumed our journey. I think I must have fallen asleep and kept30
  48. 48. Mina Murrays Journaldreaming of the incident, for it seemed to be repeated endlessly, and now looking back,it is like a sort of awful nightmare. Once the flame appeared so near the road, that evenin the darkness around us I could watch the driver’s motions. He went rapidly to wherethe blue flame arose, it must have been very faint, for it did not seem to illumine theplace around it at all, and gathering a few stones, formed them into some device. Once there appeared a strange optical effect. When he stood between me and theflame he did not obstruct it, for I could see its ghostly flicker all the same. This startledme, but as the effect was only momentary, I took it that my eyes deceived me strainingthrough the darkness. Then for a time there were no blue flames, and we sped onwardsthrough the gloom, with the howling of the wolves around us, as though they were fol-lowing in a moving circle. At last there came a time when the driver went further afield than he had yet gone,and during his absence, the horses began to tremble worse than ever and to snort andscream with fright. I could not see any cause for it, for the howling of the wolves hadceased altogether. But just then the moon, sailing through the black clouds, appearedbehind the jagged crest of a beetling, pine-clad rock, and by its light I saw around us aring of wolves, with white teeth and lolling red tongues, with long, sinewy limbs andshaggy hair. They were a hundred times more terrible in the grim silence which heldthem than even when they howled. For myself, I felt a sort of paralysis of fear. It is onlywhen a man feels himself face to face with such horrors that he can understand theirtrue import. All at once the wolves began to howl as though the moonlight had had some pecu-liar effect on them. The horses jumped about and reared, and looked helplessly roundwith eyes that rolled in a way painful to see. But the living ring of terror encompassedthem on every side, and they had perforce to remain within it. I called to the coachmanto come, for it seemed to me that our only chance was to try to break out through thering and to aid his approach, I shouted and beat the side of the caleche, hoping by thenoise to scare the wolves from the side, so as to give him a chance of reaching the trap.How he came there, I know not, but I heard his voice raised in a tone of imperious com-mand, and looking towards the sound, saw him stand in the roadway. As he swept hislong arms, as though brushing aside some impalpable obstacle, the wolves fell back andback further still. Just then a heavy cloud passed across the face of the moon, so thatwe were again in darkness. 31
  49. 49. Chapter 16 m k Dr. Sewards Diary (Continued)i t was just a quarter before twelve o’clock when we got into the churchyard over the low wall. The night was dark with occasional gleams of moonlight between the dents of the heavy clouds that scudded across the sky. We all kept somehow close together, with Van Helsing slightly in front as he led the way. When we had come close to the tomb I looked well at Arthur, for I feared the proximity to a place laden with so sorrowful a memory would upset him, but he bore himself well. I took it that the very mystery of the proceeding was in some way a counteractant to his grief. The Professor unlocked the door, and seeing a natural hesitation amongstus for various reasons, solved the difficulty by entering first himself. The rest of us fol-lowed, and he closed the door. He then lit a dark lantern and pointed to a coffin. Arthurstepped forward hesitatingly. Van Helsing said to me, “You were with me here yesterday.Was the body of Miss Lucy in that coffin?” “It was.” The Professor turned to the rest saying, “You hear, and yet there is no one who doesnot believe with me.” He took his screwdriver and again took off the lid of the coffin. Arthur looked on, verypale but silent. When the lid was removed he stepped forward. He evidently did notknow that there was a leaden coffin, or at any rate, had not thought of it. When he sawthe rent in the lead, the blood rushed to his face for an instant, but as quickly fell awayagain, so that he remained of a ghastly whiteness. He was still silent. Van Helsing forcedback the leaden flange, and we all looked in and recoiled.32
  50. 50. Dracula The coffin was empty! The impression I had was that we were leaving the West and entering the East; themost western of splendid bridges over the Danube, which is here of noble width anddepth, took us among the traditions of Turkish rule. We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh. Here I stoppedfor the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, a chicken done upsome way with red pepper, which was very good but thirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.)I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that, as it was a nation-al dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians. I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don’t know how I shouldbe able to get on without it. I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exact locality of the CastleDracula, as there are no maps of this country as yet to compare with our own OrdnanceSurvey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post town named by Count Dracula, is a fairlywell-known place. I shall enter here some of my notes, as they may refresh my memorywhen I talk over my travels with Mina. In the population of Transylvania there are four distinct nationalities: Saxons in theSouth, and mixed with them the Wallachs, who are the descendants of the Dacians;Magyars in the West, and Szekelys in the East and North. I am going among the latter,who claim to be descended from Attila and the Huns. This may be so, for when the Mag-yars conquered the country in the eleventh century they found the Huns settled in it. I read that every known superstition in the world is gathered into the horseshoe ofthe Carpathians, as if it were the centre of some sort of imaginative whirlpool; if so mystay may be very interesting. (Mem., I must ask the Count all about them.) I did not sleep well, though my bed was comfortable enough, for I had all sorts ofqueer dreams. There was a dog howling all night under my window, which may havehad something to do with it; or it may have been the paprika, for I had to drink up all thewater in my carafe, and was still thirsty. Towards morning I slept and was wakened bythe continuous knocking at my door, so I guess I must have been sleeping soundly then. I had for breakfast more paprika, and a sort of porridge of maize flour which they saidwas “mamaliga”, and egg-plant stuffed with forcemeat, a very excellent dish, which theycall “impletata”. (Mem., get recipe for this also.) 33
  51. 51. Dracula Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long,agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and thenanother and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass,a wild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as theimagination could grasp it through the gloom of the nightingly, and they quieted down,but shivered and sweated as though after a runaway from sudden fright. Then, far offin the distance, from the mountains on each side of us began a louder and a sharperhowling, that of wolves, which affected both the horses and myself in the same way. ForI was minded to jump from the caleche and run, whilst they reared again and plungedmadly, so that the driver had to use all his great strength to keep them from bolting. In afew minutes, however, my own ears got accustomed to the sound, and the horses so farbecame quiet that the driver was able to descend and to stand before them. He petted and soothed them, and whispered something in their ears, as I have heardof horse-tamers doing, and with extraordinary effect, for under his caresses they becamequite manageable again, though they still trembled. The driver again took his seat, andshaking his reins, started off at a great pace. This time, after going to the far side of thePass, he suddenly turned down a narrow roadway which ran sharply to the right. Soon we were hemmed in with trees, which in places arched right over the roadwaytill we passed as through a tunnel. And again great frowning rocks guarded us boldly oneither side. Though we were in shelter, we could hear the rising wind, for it moaned andwhistled through the rocks, and the branches of the trees crashed together as we sweptalong. It grew colder and colder still, and fine, powdery snow began to fall, so that soonwe and all around us were covered with a white blanket. The keen wind still carried thehowling of the dogs, though this grew fainter as we went on our way. The baying of thewolves sounded nearer and nearer, as though they were closing round on us from everyside. I grew dreadfully afraid, and the horses shared my fear. The driver, however, wasnot in the least disturbed. He kept turning his head to left and right, but I could not seeanything through the darkness. Suddenly, away on our left I saw a faint flickering blue flame. The driver saw it at thesame moment. He at once checked the horses, and, jumping to the ground, disappearedinto the darkness. I did not know what to do, the less as the howling of the wolves grewcloser. But while I wondered, the driver suddenly appeared again, and without a wordtook his seat, and we resumed our journey. I think I must have fallen asleep and kept34
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