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FRUGAL RESEARCH: Analysis of Sucralose (aka Splenda)
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FRUGAL RESEARCH: Analysis of Sucralose (aka Splenda)

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FRUGAL RESEARCH: Analysis of Sucralose (aka Splenda)

FRUGAL RESEARCH: Analysis of Sucralose (aka Splenda)

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    FRUGAL RESEARCH: Analysis of Sucralose (aka Splenda) FRUGAL RESEARCH: Analysis of Sucralose (aka Splenda) Presentation Transcript

    • Sucralose Human Nutrition Ryan Blaney Mike Schiemer
    • Sucralose Facts     More commonly known by the product name “Splenda” consisting of Sucralose, Maltodextrin, and Dextrose Marketed as healthier than Nutrasweet and Sweet and Low because it’s “the only 0 calorie sweetener made from real sugar!” Replaces 3 alcohol groups with 3 chlorine groups so it goes through the body unchanged and unmetabolized Categorized as a chlorocarbon, insoluble in fat and does not break down or dechlorinate
    • Sucralose Facts (continued).         600 times sweeter than sugar Splenda actually has 3 calories per tsp Heat Stable for baking and cooking like sugar, maltodextrin increases its stability Discovered in 1978 Approved by FDA in 1998 Over 100 Animal-Human Studies show it is safe to use, no warnings required Most popular artificial sweetner in the US since 2005, now a 62% market share American Dietetic Association promotes artificial sweeteners in small amounts for weight control
    • Potential Health Risks     Some hypothesize it could be related to tumor development, no research proving this however Some find it to increase appetite for real sugary food Some find correlation with weight gain, others find the opposite Some case studies found Sucralose to be a migraine trigger
    • Potential Health Risks (Continued)      Adverse health affects estimated after 75 packets of Splenda per day Thyroid and DNA damage found in rats from equivalent of thousands of packets of sucralose per day 70% does not leave GI tract and is excreted directly. 20-30% of Absorbed Sucralose enters bloodstream and filtered by kidneys, excreted as urine. Broken down by microorganisms in the environement but not by wastewater treatment plants, may accumulate in water supplies
    • Works Cited    Karstadt, Myra L. Testing needed for acesulfame potassium, an artificial sweetener. (Correspondence). Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives. 114.9 (Sept 2006): pA516(1).  Migraine Triggered by Sucralose-A Case Report. Headache: Journal of Head and Face Pain. 47.3 (March 2007): p447(1). Szalavltz, Maia. The sweetener standoff: Maia Szalavltz weighs in on the controversy involving artificial sweetners. Psychology Today. 39.5 (SeptOct 2006): p60(1) .
    • Works Cited    Karstadt, Myra L. Testing needed for acesulfame potassium, an artificial sweetener. (Correspondence). Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives. 114.9 (Sept 2006): pA516(1).  Migraine Triggered by Sucralose-A Case Report. Headache: Journal of Head and Face Pain. 47.3 (March 2007): p447(1). Szalavltz, Maia. The sweetener standoff: Maia Szalavltz weighs in on the controversy involving artificial sweetners. Psychology Today. 39.5 (SeptOct 2006): p60(1) .