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Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing
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Maximizing Resources with Crowdsourcing

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Digital Health Communications Extravaganza 2013 presentation given by @emilyspringer and @oleandros

Digital Health Communications Extravaganza 2013 presentation given by @emilyspringer and @oleandros

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  • Hi! [Emily introduces herself:]My name is Emily Springer.[Don introduces himself:] My name is Don Jones. We’re with Booz Allen Hamilton, and we’re delighted to be here with you today. As health communicators, the basis of what we do is the understanding of our audience. Although crowdsourcing is not a new concept, who better to garner ideas and insights from than the open channels and communitieswe already have access to?As missions are expanding and research budgets are tightening, crowdsourcing will continue to be an important supplement for continuing to work smarter and more efficiently and effectively in the years to come.
  • You may have noticed the bird on this slide. For those of you on Twitter, we’ve included these “tweetable moments” for you to tweet today. The tweets include key take-aways from our presentation.The tweets also include the #DHCX hashtag, so others who could not join us can learn about today’s session.
  • In crowdsourcing efforts, the solutions to problems often come from those who are not in the field from which a question is posed. (Digital Journal) In fact it has been found that the further a person is away from the questions being asked, the more likely they are in coming up with a solution – and that solution comes much quicker than when it's researched from 'inside the box.' In spite of the opportunities for efficiency, many organizations are really still figuring out ways to effectively implement crowdsourcing initiatives.Today I am going to share patterns that have been found among effective crowdsourcing initiatives, as well as insights on using crowdsourcing in the context of health. Driving innovation and efficiency in the context of your missions really calls for identifying opportunities to garner open feedback onthe ideas of the populations we’re trying to reach, or key players in systematic healthcare processes. We’ll start with some key patterns observed in successful crowdsourcing initiatives, and follow by illustrating examples and takeaways from how we’ve used crowdsourcing to maximize resources. These include:-The Real Warriors Campaign crowdsourcing pilot – a micro example that demonstrates use of existing forums (e.g., the Facebook and Twitter pages we’d advocated our organizations to establish) to obtain unstructured insights and feedback from audiences -The Booz Allen Ideas Festival – a macro example that will demonstrate opportunities for engaging the “doers” within a network or organization who can affect change We’ll end by discussing the possibilities for using crowdsourcing in health.
  • So how do you crowdsource health? Crowdsourcing is flexible, and can be used to help solve a wide range of issues – but for health specifically it’s important to think about: 1. The surroundings of our audiences (think like an anthropologist, or of the factors that make up the Healthy People 2020’s Determinants of Health). -INNOVATION takes thinking about the pieces we have to work with, and that includes the relevant things in the everyday lives of the populations we’re targeting. -Especially in the age of mobile, we need to be thinking about “touch points”: -Socially -Where audiences receive health services -Policies that affect behaviors -Individual beliefs and preferences 2. Curating empowerment. -When implementing social media for example you can say you are listening, but do you really give a hoot? Structure your approach thinking about how your audience can ACT and GET INVOLVED.
  • While crowdsourcing is flexible and adaptable, it still requires careful planning and management to fully exploit its capabilities. By working closely with federal agencies to implement crowdsourcing initiatives, Booz Allen Hamilton has found that successful organizations follow four fundamental guidelines, including:1. Adapt crowdsourcing tools and engagement platforms to their org’s unique goals. 2. Educate leaders and decision-makers on what crowdsourcing is – and what it is NOT. 3. Clearly state the problem or the question for the feedback desired. Frame challenges and questions openly and appropriately among target audiences – particularly in the case of sensitive topics like mental health – to increase quality/honesty in responses 4. Facilitate participation and build community; encourages more open feedback even when you are not asking questions / looking for feedback
  • To supplement research efforts – for insight into audiences’ perceptions within their SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT – one option is to tap into the community you may have already established via social media. We did this as a pilot to supplement research initiatives for anecdotal, qualitative insights related to audience attitudes and beliefs related to reaching out and seeking care for psychological health concerns. BUT FIRST: What is the Real Warriors Campaign? The Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awareness campaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among service members and veterans coping with psychological health concerns.Booz Allen developed the campaign, and launched in 2009. The Real Warriors Campaign is sponsored by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE).The campaign is an integral part of the Defense Department’s overall effort to eliminate the stigma that was identified in the 2007 DoD Mental Health Task Force Report and encourage help-seeking behavior for invisible wounds.
  • [If there’s time…]Using the HBM, the campaign is based on research on the motivators and barriers existing within the military community and the factorsthat will influence change:They want proof. Personal examples of service members who have received treatment and are maintaining a successful military career.They want success, either in their military career or post-service.They want to see themselves. Represent a variety of services, ranks (enlisted and officers) and age as well as both active duty and Guard and Reserve.We used research gathered to develop the plans and marketing strategies to create the campaign elements. [Key points on this slide:]Here you can see a snapshot of the marketing tactics we use. The Real Warriors Campaign is a web-based campaign (realwarriors.net). The tools and resources available through the campaign for service members, Guardsmen and reservists and their families include: DCoE Outreach Center – a 24/7, free phone number that anyone can call for assistance finding the support resources for warriors and their families Video profiles and PSA’s Podcasts Mobile site Articles Print materials A big part of how we promote the campaign’s resources is through its social media channels. The campaign’s Facebook, Twitter and YouTube channels amplify the campaign’s reach online by engaging with fans/followers, promoting actionable resources available at www.realwarriors.net and targeting audiences on international and local levels.
  • So what was our crowdsourcing strategy? The goal was to garner anecdotal insights to: To provide DCoE with anecdotal, grassroots insights on the stigma and psychological barriers to care issue. DCoE’s Extended Outcomes Survey To scan audience perspectives in an open, unstructured manner to inform structured research design and planning. While structured research was in its preliminary planning stages when the pilot was executed, 2012 marked 3 years since the campaign had garnered in-depth, formalized feedback. The approach: Our team initiated a 10-week crowdsourcing task using Facebook and Twitter to crowdsource responses to stigma and behavioral health related questions.Messages were framed openly to facilitate responses, and questions were posted with various hashtags and calls-to-actions.
  • Here you can see one of the questions we shared with the U.S. Army to ask their fans was: “What does being resilient mean to you? Other questions included [read two questions]:“What would motivate you to get help for a psychological health concern?“Do you know anyone who had a positive experience reaching out for psychological health care?“How would you help a friend having trouble adjusting after deployment?“What does being resilient mean to you? Comment with your thoughts. [If there’s time, share:] To facilitate diversity in viewership and responses, questions were posted on every day of the week and at various times.To expand reach, we equipped more than 100 social media ambassadors at the Defense Department/Services/Department of Veterans Affairs with crowdsourcing questions to post in their Facebook and Twitter channels on behalf of the campaign.-Social media ambassadors’ dissemination of crowdsourcing questions helped us double the volume of responses
  • In general, we saw productive, honest discussions regarding help-seeking behavior.We also heard from target audiences who needed support. For example, in one post, a chaplain commented saying he helped others but did not have support for himself. In that instance, our fans chimed in providing support, and we responded by sharing the DCoE Outreach Center for 24/7 assistance.Many responses were consistent with focus group findings from three years ago: Audiences want to see themselves Audiences are still concerned about reaching out for care, with respect to how it might affect their careerNow, what you see on this slide is the most engaging question asked in the campaign’s channels. The post occurred on Facebook and the specific question was: “if you could change one thing about psychological health care in the military, what would it be?”The question received more than 80 interactions – which showed support for asking the question.One of the themes that emerged in response to this question was about stigma. Specifically, Facebook users said “no consequences for asking for help” and that “leaders should be supportive of asking help.”Although this is not scientific research, the anecdotal responses validate the importance showing by example that it’s possible to reach out and maintain your career (RE: campaign videos) The importance of leadership support for reaching out was a common theme in responses (e.g., “Leaders should voluntarily make a mental health appointment to lead by example, increase familiarization, and remove stigma.”)
  • So what’s the key takeway from this pilot? 1. The vast majority of our responses garnered anecdotal evidence that target audience values/attitudes in their community environments were consistent with focus group research – as conducted prior to the launch of the campaign. Anecdotes have confirmed: The fact that audiences want to “see themselves,” and that audiences are concerned about how reaching out might hurt their career are the basis for message development 2. Audiences ARE open to talking about sensitive psychological health topicsThis is HUGE when you’re working to reduce stigmaWe also observed increases of engagement that correlated with asking questions in this effort From a strategy perspective, we have continued to look for opportunities to ask questions related to audience attitudes, beliefs and values (e.g., in podcasts) 3. Crowdsourcingfeedbackconfirmed the positive, supportive community on our page For example, for the chaplain commented who said he helped others but did not have support for himself, many fans chimed in providing support. [We also responded by sharing the DCoE Outreach Center for 24/7 assistance.]At the agency-level, this feedback has been of significant value entering the research design and planning process, as the last time more formal research had been conducted was three years ago. Feedback has informed: -Refinements to questions asked in the campaign’s Interactive Customer Evaluation (ICE) survey on the campaign’s website-Planning for more in-depth research efforts (e.g., focus group research, DCoE Extended Outcomes survey). -Although this was NOT scientific research, the broader themes that appear to confirm the campaign messaging have been noted. Pictured: A total of 110 social media posts were disseminated by the campaign and social media ambassadors – which resulted in 2,389 responses from Facebook and Twitter users. -Responses included the following types of interactions: Likes, shares, comments and likes of comments on Facebook. Retweets, replies and retweets of replies on Twitter.*REMINDER: Crowdsourcing in social media CANNOT replace traditional research methods! In particular for government campaign’s, this is NOT a way around getting OMB Clearance. For government campaign’s in particular, exercise caution in that questions must ask for unstructured feedback – vs. polls for example that ask more specific measureable questions. You cannot study the public without going through the right processes. For example, Facebook fans did not click LIKE with the agreement they’d be studied.
  • So what’s the key takeway from this pilot? 1. The vast majority of our responses garnered anecdotal evidence that target audience values/attitudes in their community environments were consistent with focus group research – as conducted prior to the launch of the campaign. Anecdotes have confirmed: The fact that audiences want to “see themselves,” and that audiences are concerned about how reaching out might hurt their career are the basis for message development 2. Audiences ARE open to talking about sensitive psychological health topicsThis is HUGE when you’re working to reduce stigmaWe also observed increases of engagement that correlated with asking questions in this effort From a strategy perspective, we have continued to look for opportunities to ask questions related to audience attitudes, beliefs and values (e.g., in podcasts) 3. Another powerful takeaway confirmed the positive, supportive community on our page For example, for the chaplain commented who said he helped others but did not have support for himself, many fans chimed in providing support. [We also responded by sharing the DCoE Outreach Center for 24/7 assistance.]At the agency-level, this feedback has been of significant value entering the research design and planning process, as the last time more formal research had been conducted was three years ago. Feedback has informed: -Refinements to questions asked in the campaign’s Interactive Customer Evaluation (ICE) survey on the campaign’s website-Planning for more in-depth research efforts (e.g., focus group research, DCoE Extended Outcomes survey). -Although this was NOT scientific research, the broader themes that appear to confirm the campaign messaging have been noted. Pictured: A total of 110 social media posts were disseminated by the campaign and social media ambassadors – which resulted in 2,389 responses from Facebook and Twitter users. -Responses included the following types of interactions: Likes, shares, comments and likes of comments on Facebook. Retweets, replies and retweets of replies on Twitter.*REMINDER: Crowdsourcing in social media CANNOT replace traditional research methods! In particular for government campaign’s, this is NOT a way around getting OMB Clearance. For government campaign’s in particular, exercise caution in that questions must ask for unstructured feedback – vs. polls for example that ask more specific measureable questions. You cannot study the public without going through the right processes. For example, Facebook fans did not click LIKE with the agreement they’d be studied.
  • Our next example is on maximizing resources by leveraging the assets you have to CURATE EMPOWERMENT for solutions. -The creativity of the folks implementing your initiatives are an often untapped asset-At BAH, we developed an ideation strategy for an annual internal campaign calling on staff to submit innovative ideas to improve efficiency and support of our clientsThe challenge: Each year, Booz Allen invites its employees (25,000 worldwide) to share innovative ideas that they would like the firm to develop and/or implement to address its clients’ greatest needs. In previous years, employees entered the Annual Ideas Contest by completing and e-mailing a one-page abstract in a Word document format to festival organizers. A committee of the firm’s senior leaders reviewed all of the abstracts to determine the finalists, which they invited to present at the Annual Ideas Festival. One or more of the finalists were then selected as the winners and in some cases, received investment money for their ideas. With hundreds of ideas submitted each year, the process was highly laborious for the leaders. It also did not provide any visibility to the hundreds of entries that may have been good ideas, but simply not appropriate for the festival. For the 2013 festival, organizers sought the ideation expertise developed by the firm’s client-facing strategic communications team. The goal was:To enable participation across the firm’s teams and geographic locations, Save money by reducing labor required for evaluation, and Create greater visibility for all ideas submitted. In addition to soliciting ideas for the Annual Ideas Contest, the festival organizers also wanted to solicit suggestions for agenda topics at the Ideas Summit (an annual day-long event modeled after the Aspen Ideas Festival). The goal of this was to introduce users to the site and encourage participation prior to the main event, the Ideas Contest.
  • Overall, festival organizers accomplished their main goals by: Creating greater visibility and collaboration for all ideas.Empowered staff to shape the firm’s focusBooz Allen employees submitted an impressive 253 ideas, 622 comments and 20,613 votes for the two sub-campaigns (Panel Topics campaign and Annual Ideas Contest) – which is more than 25 percent participation across 23,000+ employees. This is a high adoption rate (typical rates are between 15-20 percent) from many crowdsourcing campaigns. Saving money by reducing labor costs.Reduced the overall budget for the festival by 9 percent, based on the labor saved through online evaluation and voting. Enabling participation across the firm’s teams and geographic locations. Also received 95 percent saturation from the 74 offices worldwide.In terms of organizational culture, the effort provided these benefits [read slide]#1 – Successfully created and implemented a tailored approach for transitioning ideation from a traditional submission process to a social media platform. #2 – The campaigns served as a direct line to staff members to improve on everyday innovations that have been previously untapped. It gave the power to make an impact to the firm and its clients in a tangible way.#3 – Messaging informed employees on the status of the campaigns and ways to get involved. Users expressed appreciation for the transparency through Yammer posts and e-mails to Ideas Festival leadership. Support team communicated to employees through Yammer, internal blogs, newsletters, leadership memos, direct e-mails, kitchen posters, lobby graphics, team meetings and communities of practiceAgain, you have to show stakeholders that you are listening – and that you actually give a hoot and want meaningful action! Now even though this example is not health-specific, it can be applied in health settings – networks of doctors? Nurses? How can we engage captive waiting room staff for solutions to our healthcare system?
  • [To invite possibilities, ASK:] How could you see this example affecting change in your organization? What are the touch points in your organization or client agency where you might implement crowdsourcing to reach the decision-makers? What does the future hold as people are more connected with more opportunities to contribute to solving health problems?EXAMPLE 1:AsthmapolisBe cognizant of the environment in which your audience behaves or operatesFor example – think about how information could be collected locally in a way that is relevant to your audience. What are your audience members ALREADY DOING that could potentially inform the intervention or communications initiative you’re planning? We can design studies to integrate and fit everywhere our audiences are. Both of these examples consider the concept of mobile audiences. EXAMPLE 2: VA Appointment Scheduling app contest Foster community to empower and encourage changeChallenge.gov contests such as the VA Appointment Scheduling are examples that empower for innovationVA contest is currently calling for help creating systems that are compatible with Open Source VistA and help to lead health IT transformation – to help Veterans make appointments for VA outpatient and ambulatory careEmpowerment can even be facilitated in waiting rooms, where patients are captive audiences and already thinking about their health. Are there questions that could be asked on their smartphones? Could you ‘check-in’ with your device and complete questionaires?Again, if solutions so often come from those who are not close to those posing the questions (Digital Journal), we need to make sure we are establishing a means for the problem solvers to contribute those answers.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Maximizing Resources with EffectiveCrowdsourcingDigital Health Communications Extravaganza
    • 2. Tweet this Talk
    • 3. Agenda• How do you crowdsource health?• Case study: Real Warriors Campaign crowdsourcing pilot• Case study: Booz Allen Ideas Festival• The possibilities
    • 4. How do you Crowdsource Health?
    • 5. Four Fundamentals of CrowdsourcingOrganizations that are successful atcrowdsourcing follow fourfundamental guidelines, including:1. Adopt and/or adapt crowdsourcingplatforms to their unique goals2. Educate leaders and decision-makers on what crowdsourcing is –and what it is NOT3. Clearly state the problem or thequestions4. Actively facilitate and buildcommunity
    • 6. Real Warriors CampaignThe Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awarenesscampaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among servicemembers and veterans coping with psychological health concerns.
    • 7. Crowdsourcing behavioral health questionsprovides anecdotal, grassroots feedback… This April 29 Facebook post received more than 1,400 likes and comments, vastly positive, in 24 hours and facilitated more than 800 referrals to www.realwarriors.net. The most popular response that received the most “likes.”
    • 8. Anecdotal Results This April 11 Facebook post received more than 80 likes and comments. Provides insight on „grassroots‟ concerns and validates the campaign message that “reaching out is a sign of strength.”
    • 9. Crowdsourcing Responses by Type 11
    • 10. Crowdsourcing Responses by Behavior 12
    • 11. Case study: Booz Allen Ideas Festival
    • 12. Booz Allen Ideas Festival Takeaways – Created greater visibility and collaboration for all ideas. – Saved money by reducing labor costs. – Enabled participation across the firm‟s teams and geographic locations.
    • 13. How are You CrowdsourcingHealth Solutions?
    • 14. Connect with the Real Warriors CampaignConnect with Booz Allen

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