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Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking
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Architecting the Building Blocks of Enterprise Social Networking

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Note: Some builds and layouts/colors did not come out with the same fidelity as the PPT. …

Note: Some builds and layouts/colors did not come out with the same fidelity as the PPT.

What are the architectural building blocks that enable social networking? What cultural dynamics should be considered when implementing “social infrastructure”? What research methods aid design efforts? This session will help architects and practitioners understand connections between profiles and identity, social objects and participation, activity streams/micro-blogging and formation of social networks.

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  • 1. Architecting the Building Blocks ofEnterprise Social NetworkingMichael GottaSenior Technology Solutions ManagerEnterprise Social Softwaremikeg.typepad.com (personal blog)@MikeGotta (Twitter)© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 2011 Cisco Confidential 1
  • 2. Communities Projects Conversations Processes People to People Teams Information People Media People To to Artifact Activity ―Ties‖© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2
  • 3. Business Value Organizational Value  Expertise location  Employee  Exception handling engagement  Process cycle time  Talent discovery  Project coordination  Social learning  Information sharing  Onboarding new hires  Innovation  Participatory culture© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 3
  • 4. Well-Known Emergent Traditional E2.0 & Collaboration Social Media Unified Enterprise 2.0, Communications Social Media… Traditional Semantics and Collaboration Social Semantics Analytics Social Unified Communications Network & Social Site (SNS) Analytics Enterprise Content Visualization Management Enterprise Content Visualization Management© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4
  • 5. Any Application Any Content / Site Any Device (Internal / External) (Internal / External) (@Work or @Home)―E2.0‖ Communications “Social-enabled” Applications Video & Unified Activity Streams Search Services Forums―E1.0‖ Blog Wiki Tags Workspaces Social FeedbackCommon (“Like”, “Follow”, “Rate”, “Reputation”…) CommunitiesServices Metadata and Content Services Profile & Social Graph Semantics and Analytics Federation & Integration Services Network, Infrastructure & Management Services © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 5
  • 6. EA Role IA Role Enterprise Architect Information Architect Organizational Architect Social Insight Sociologist and/or Anthropologist Visualization, Semantics, Social Data Stewardship People To People Alignment Solution Role Technology Role Applications Architecture Products & Infrastructure Community Management Social Platform Social Network Analysis, UXP design Graph Engines, Event Processing, Policy-based Controls© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 6
  • 7. Business Value Personal Value Organizational Value Expertise location  Identity  Employee Exception handling engagement  Contacts & information Process cycle time  Talent discovery  Sense of community Project coordination  Social learning  Visibility & reputation Information sharing  Onboarding new hires  Social capital Innovation  Participatory culture  Skills/competencies  Career advancement© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 7
  • 8. Formation, Cultivation Front Stage Back Stage& Mobilization Contexts Job People, information, commu Seeking opportunities, mentors, advi nities ce, personal motivations Purpose Assigned work, visibly Cultivation of social volunteer resources (CSR) Newly Learn local Transitions hired, promotion, next folklore, gain/build co- project, new team… worker support M&A, outsourced, reduction Career issues, emotional Disruption in force, retirement support (personal) © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 8
  • 9. Social Networking Design Considerations Theory Methods Practices TechnologySociology E-MailAnthropology Discussion ForumsPsychology Instant MessagingCommunications Social Network SitesOrganizational E2.0 / Social Media Development Tools© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 9
  • 10. My OtherMy “Enterprise Identity” Social IdentitiesMike Gotta EMPLOYEE # TITLE DEPARTMENT CONTACY INFO My Activities REPORTINT CHAIN JOB TITLE / ROLE Blogs Wikis My “Claimed Identity” My Social FeedbackEXPERTISE EDUCATIONINTERESTS SKILLSHOBBIES PERSONAL TAGS Ascribed + Claimed + Performed + Reciprocated Enterprise Identity 10© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
  • 11. Social Role “Answer Person” Enterprise Identity Discussion Wiki Jessica Savage Forum JOB TITLE: CALL CENTER AGENT EMPLOYEE #: 00124 Community DEPARTMENT #: 015 HOBBIES: XXX, YYY, ZZZ “My Questions Blog and & Answers” Micro-blog© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11
  • 12. Teams Communities“Project-based” Ties Interest-based Ties Corporate Business Business Processes Units Units Social Networks Reporting-based Role-based Ties Ties © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 12
  • 13. Follow Person My Filtered View Tag Content“Project-based” Ties Activity Stream Post Blog Entry Ask Question Follow Tag/Topic Interest-based Ties Schedule Meeting Share Exception Join Community Start Web Helps mediate Role-based Ties Conference “Latent Ties”© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 13
  • 14. Follow Person My Filtered View Tag Content Recommendations Social Networking Activity Stream Post Blog Entry Alerts & Notifications Ask Question Patterns Analytics Data Social Store Graph Policy Policy© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 14
  • 15. Object + Data + Interaction + Appropriation + Sharing + Analytics Cultivation Identity of Social Construction Resources Status Questions Digital Events Social Object Content Work Exception Meetings Network Handling Mobilization Affiliations© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 15
  • 16. Social Networking Design Considerations Theory Methods Practices Technology Interviews Surveys Ethnography Sampling & Measurement Social Network Analysis© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 16
  • 17. • Think about the people with whom you interact regularly during your day-to-day work activities. Estimate what proportion of those people with whom you interact regularly in a work related context work internal to Company ABC as opposed to external to Company ABC (i.e., a customer, partner). • Slide the bar to the point on the line you feel best reflects the percentage of time you spend interacting with people internal to Company ABC as opposed to people external to Company ABC.• Now think just about the people within Company ABC with whom you interact regularly during your day-to-day work activities. Estimate what proportion of those people with whom you interact regularly work within Name-Of-Manager’s-Group and the corresponding groups in your business unit as opposed to the rest of Company ABC. • Slide the bar to the point on the line you feel best reflects the percentage of time you spend interacting with people inside Name-Of-Manager’s-Group as opposed to outside it.© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 17
  • 18. • Now, think specifically about the people within Name-Of-Manager’s- Group and the corresponding external groups with whom you interact regularly. Please list their full names in each box below. Feel free to list as many or as few people as you think applies to you.• You will be asked a few follow-up questions about each of these people on the next few pages. 30 spaces are provided for you to list names on this page. You do not have to list 30 names and fill in every space.• Only list the names of people you feel best represent those within Name- Of-Manager’s-Group with whom you interact regularly. If you are unsure whether or not the individual is part of the survey pool, please go ahead and list them anyway.© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 18
  • 19. • For each individual previously identified, please select the method(s) of communication you use to collaborate with them. Select all that apply. Interaction Types: F2F, e-mail, phone, IM, web conferencing, SNS, etc.• How frequently do you communicate with each person within the context of your job? . Range: 1 (rarely) – 7 (very often)• How frequently do you go to each person for advice, information, or assistance to do your job better? Range: 1 (rarely) – 7 (very often)• How comfortable would you feel approaching each person to discuss sensitive topics? Range: 1 (very uncomfortable) – 7 (very comfortable)• How frequently do you go to each person to assist you with innovation, problem solving, and coming up with new solutions? Range: 1 (rarely) – 7 (very often)© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 19
  • 20. Groups© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 20
  • 21. Team ABC Team XYZ© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 21
  • 22. Groups© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 22
  • 23. One way relation (not reciprocal Groups ties) indicates interaction as broadcast message or channel switching© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 23
  • 24. Social Networking Design Considerations Theory Methods Practices Technology Community-building Frameworks Adoption Tactics Change Management Programs ―Social BPM‖© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 24
  • 25. HR & + Corporate + Audit & + Business + IT + Research Legal Communications Compliance Units Organization Group(s) Planning, Financial Marketing & Management Education Change Management Program Project Resource Management Management© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 25
  • 26. Early “Seeding Adopter Tactics” Outreach User Experience Media Design Literacies Adoption Applied Program Community Research Engagement Change Governance Management Program Program© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 26
  • 27. • New methods are likely needed • Blend and connect methods• Theory is relevant but needs to to existing frameworks as it be expressed in your own makes sense organizational context • Skills and competencies• Research needs to be likely to come externally but applied to your own should be grown internally situation over time• Theory needs to be linked in a life-cycle manner • Expect push-back, this model relies on a lot of qualitative approaches • Blend and connect practices into existing approaches (e.g., Community Management, Social BPM) • Feedback loop based on experiences should flow back to affect assumptions © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 27
  • 28. • Albrechtslund, A. (2008). Online Social Networking as Participatory Surveillance. First Monday, 13(3). Retrieved from http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/ 2142/1949• boyd, d. (2011, October 15). Embracing a Culture of Connectivity | Berkman Center. (video). Retrieved from http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/interactive/events/2011/05/danahboy d• boyd, danahm, & Ellison, N. B. (2007). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of Computer‐Mediated Communication, 13(1), 210-230. doi:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00393.x Retrieved from http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.html© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 28
  • 29. • Ellison, N., (2011, October 15). Benefits of Facebook ―Friends‖ | Berkman Center. Retrieved from http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/interactive/events/luncheon/2011/06/ ellison• Engeström, J. (2005). Why some social network services work and others don’t — Or: the case for object-centered sociality :: Zengestrom. (n.d.). Retrieved October 25, 2011, from http://www.zengestrom.com/blog/2005/04/why-some-social- network-services-work-and-others-dont-or-the-case-for-object- centered-sociality.html• Engeström, J. (2007). What makes a good social object :: Zengestrom. (n.d.). Retrieved October 25, 2011, from http://www.zengestrom.com/blog/2007/08/what-makes-a-good- social-object.html© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 29
  • 30. • Gleave, E., Welser, H. T., Lento, T. M., & Smith, M. A. (2009). A Conceptual and Operational Definition of ―Social Role‖ in Online Community. 42nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2009. HICSS ’09 (pp. 1-11). Presented at the 42nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2009. HICSS ’09, IEEE. doi:10.1109/HICSS.2009.6• Jenkins, H. (2009). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. The MIT Press. Retrieved fromhttp://digitallearning.macfound.org/site/apps/nlnet/content2.a spx?c=enJLKQNlFiG&b=2108773&ct=3017973&notoc=1© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 30
  • 31. • Pearson, E. (2009). All the World Wide Web’s a stage: The performance of identity in online social networks. First Monday, 14(3), 1–7. Retrieved from http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/vie w/2162/2127Annotated Bibliography• Collaboration Thinking, Mike Gotta, http://mikeg.typepad.com/perceptions/2011/11/annotated- bibliography-background-for-literature-review-project.htmlLiterature Review• Check back in early December© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 31
  • 32. Thank you.© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 32

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