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An introduction to curriculum mapping based on the work of Heidi Hayes Jacobs, Janet Hale, Bena Kalick, Arthur Costa, and more.

An introduction to curriculum mapping based on the work of Heidi Hayes Jacobs, Janet Hale, Bena Kalick, Arthur Costa, and more.

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  • Dear author, would it be possible to get a copy of these slides please. its really valuable and teachers can get lots of benefits from this.
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  • Dear author the content of the slide is very informative. Will it be feasible to save and use it for presentation to a group of students with due credit to you? If so kindly mail the presentation to devavidhu2003@yahoo.coin
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  • The essential question most of your are asking at the moment is, Why are we mapping?
  • In addition to describing the journey, there are other reasons that schools choose to map. All of these reasons have merit. The critical thing is that administrators and teachers are in agreement as the purpose for mapping. We also must always keep in mind that mapping seeks to see the big picture. However, teachers need to look for ways that this process can simplify their job and make them more effective teachers. TechPaths provides a resource for developing a big picture view as well as a tool teachers can use in their classrooms for planning and even presentations. With this mind lets take a moment and think about why we believe our school/district is mapping. Click

Curriculum mapping intro Curriculum mapping intro Presentation Transcript

  • An Introduction to: Curriculum Mapping
  • Why map? To Support Data Informed Decision Making
  • Data informed culture to improve student achievement Data drives your decisions Curriculum data aligned to standards Assessment data aligned to standards Curriculum mapping Analysis of results Written curriculum Taught curriculum State and National Local
  • Evidence Vs Claim “ Maps equal data … Data equals facts and figures … Facts and figures show trends … And with this knowledge, we can give ‘all the above’ meaning by looking at the trends and comparing it to other data bases .” Curriculum Mapping Conference, 2003
    • The journey that a student makes through our system.
    • What our real, taught curriculum is.
    • How what I do relates to what my colleagues do.
    • How our curriculum aligns with standards.
    • What needs to be added or deleted.
    • How student performance influences our curriculum.
    • In short, what our curriculum direction is.
    We map to determine…
    • We acknowledge that what happens in the classroom is the real curriculum.
    • We recognize the mapping process as a means to determine the curriculum in our District.
    • We believe that dialogue based on data will lead to changes and modifications that will improve student performance in not only our school, but also in our students’ lives.
    A Paradigm Shift……
  • Creating a Community of Learners
    • Team
    • Trust
    • Flexibility
    • Respect
    • Communication
    • Collaboration
    • Support
    • Consistency
    The Culture of Mapping:
  • Clarify (Revisit) Goals and Purpose * From Assessment in the Learning Organization, Shifting the Paradigm Page 27 - Edited by Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick, ASCD 1995 Plan Take Action / Experiment Assess and Gather Evidence Study / Reflect / Evaluate Feedback Spiral Modify Actions Based on New Knowledge Clarify Goals and Purpose Plan Take Action /Experiment Assess / Gather Evidence Study / Reflect / Evaluate Modify Actions Based on New Knowledge Clarify (Revisit) Goals and Purpose Plan Take Action /Experiment Assess / Gather Evidence Study / Reflect /Evaluate Modify Actions Based on New Knowledge
    • Move from teacher isolated classrooms to a community of learners
    • Teacher’s maps provide the data used by a community of learners to:
        • Find gaps and repetitions
        • Modify curriculum
        • Communicate
        • Dialogue
    General Goals for Mapping
    • Essential Questions
    • Content
    • Skills
    • Assessments
    • Lessons
    • Standards
    • Units and Sub-Units
    Basic Mapping Vocabulary
    • Are open ended
    • Are arguable
    • Push student thinking to higher levels of Bloom’s
    • Require students to relate their learning to real life
    • No more than five per unit as a general rule of thumb
    • Should serve to focus student learning
    Over-arching questions that focus on either big ideas and concepts or major themes with regard to curriculum content. Essential Questions
    • Are nouns or noun phrases
    • Contain descriptive adjectives that clarify the “what” students should KNOW
    • Reflect the “whats” (nouns and noun phrases) in the standards the unit is based on
    • Are the big ideas, concepts or processes students should know long after the unit is over
    Identified content that we expect students to know by the end of a given unit of instruction.  Content should be aligned to essential questions, skills, assessments, lessons and standards. Content
  • Identified skills that we expect students to be able to do by the end of a given period of time.  These skills are directly connected to a particular content. Skills may be associated with many content areas, since skills are always being learned and reinforced.   Skills
    • Are action verbs or verb phrases
    • Begin with a clearly observable, measurable verb (to serve
    • as a basis for assessments) and a curricular target.
    • Match the level of Blooms indicated by the standard it is
    • derived from
    • Is aligned to the Content or Contents it will be taught through
    • Represents what students HAVE TO DO
    • Are demonstrations of learning
    • Provide observable evidence of performance.
    • Represent a clear measure of the Skills and Contents aligned to
    Opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do as described by benchmarks and standards. Assessments
    • Assessments can be designated for three different purposes:
    • Assessment OF learning : This assessment is designed as a summary event, generally at the end of a unit or as a benchmark. (Summative)
    • Assessment FOR learning : This assessment is designed to provide on-going feedback to students in the process of learning. (Formative)
    • Student self-assessment : This assessment is designed for students to become more capable of monitoring and adjusting their own work. (Formative)
    Assessment Purpose Adapted from Richard J.Stiggins, Student- Involved Classroom Assessment, 2001
    • Content – is the subject matter; key concepts; facts; topics; important information. It represents the “WHAT.”
    • Skills – are the targeted proficiencies; technical actions and strategies. It represents the “HOW.”
    • Assessment – is the demonstration of learning; the products and performances used as evidence of skill development and content understanding
    Heidi Hayes Jacobs, The Center for Curriculum Mapping, 2005. Keep in Mind….
    • Objectives in Lessons should parallel Skills and Standards.
    • Lessons help students answer Essential Questions using the skills/objectives as tools.
    • Content is the vehicle used to allow students to learn how to use skills.
    Descriptions of the instructional activities a teacher designs to prepare students for success with regard to the assessment targets.  Lessons
    • Standards are used as basis for development of content, skills and objectives for lessons.
    • Standards define what type of assessments are appropriate for evaluating student proficiency
    • Standards represent minimum expectations for all students.
    • Curriculum and practice are derived from the Standards .
    Statements that reflect the larger outcomes that we expect all students to be able to demonstrate before they leave our school.  Standards
    • is an on-going process
    • created by teachers for teachers
    • encourages collaboration and reflection
    • helps teachers document the curriculum
    • allows teachers to see if there are gaps, overlaps, or redundancies in the curriculum
    • allows teachers to analyze and prioritize the standards
    • helps teachers to align the taught content, skills, and assessments
    Curriculum Mapping
  • Curriculum Design (Who? What? When? Where? Why?)
    • Non-negotiable – everyone teaches the same
    • Unit Names
    • Essential Questions
    • Content
    • Skills
    • Standards/Performance Indicators
  • Curriculum Practice (How?)
    • Teacher choice
    • Assessments
    • Resources
    • Activities
    • Lesson Plans
  • Prioritizing Standards
    • Endurance – Will it help students years from now?
    • Readiness – Is it developmentally appropriate for your students?
    • Leverage – Will it help students in other content areas?
    • Any Test, Any Given Year – What is tested year after year? Trends?
    Hale, J. (2007). A guide to curriculum mapping: Planning, implementing, and sustaining the process . Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Prioritizing Standards continued…
    • Critical Learning (50%) (CORE Map)
    • Need to Know Learning (25%) (CORE Map)
    • Still Need to Know Learning (25%) (Teacher choice – Diary Map)
    • Abandon (?%) (repeated at other grade levels)
    Hale, J. (2007). A guide to curriculum mapping: Planning, implementing, and sustaining the process . Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  •                                                                 Critical Learning ~50% Need To Know Learning ~25% Still Need To Know Learning ~25% Bullseye Prioritizing Standards Hale, J. (2007). A guide to curriculum mapping: Planning, implementing, and sustaining the process . Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Prioritizing Standards
    • Critical learning standard statements are those that all teachers involved in the prioritizing process agree must be learned through deep instruction and practice to ensure each student reaches independency (some may prefer to use the term mastery ) regarding the content and skills associated with the standard statements.
    • Need to know learning standard statements are those that all teachers involved in the prioritizing process agree must be learned through average instruction and practice to ensure each student is moving toward or may reach independency of the content and skills associated with the standard statements.  
    • Still need to know learning standard statements are those that all teachers involved in the prioritizing process agree must be learned at either (a) an introductory or exposure instruction-and-practice level to ensure each student is aware of the rudimentary learning necessary to later focus on achieving independency (mastery) of the content and skills associated with the standard statements; or (b) reinforcing or application of standard statements that were at one time a critical or need to know learning.
    Hale, J. (2007). A guide to curriculum mapping: Planning, implementing, and sustaining the process . Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
    • 1. Curriculum mapping is a multifaceted, ongoing process designed to improve student learning.
    • 2. All curricular decisions are data-driven and in the students' best interest.
    • 3. Curriculum maps represent both the planned and operational learning.
    • 4. Curriculum maps are created and accessible using 21st century technology.
    • 5. Teachers are leaders in curriculum design and curricular decision-making processes.
    Ten Tenets of Curriculum Mapping
    • 6. Administrators encourage and support teacher-leader environments.
    • 7. Curriculum reviews are conducted on an ongoing and regular basis.
    • 8. Collaborative inquiry and dialogue are based on curriculum maps and other data sources.
    • 9. Action plans aid in designing, revising, and refining maps.
    • 10. Curriculum mapping intra-organizations facilitate sustainability.
    Ten Tenets of Curriculum Mapping Hale, J. (2007). A guide to curriculum mapping: Planning, implementing, and sustaining the process . Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Curriculum mapping is never “done”… “ Stop asking me if we are almost there, we’re Nomads for crying out loud!”
  • Questions?