"Weaving Your Way Through the Web of Technology Conference 2008"

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  • The National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan: Developed in 2003 by local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement officials Contains 28 recommendations and action items that provide agencies a blueprint for criminal intelligence sharing policies, procedures, standards, technologies and training Endorsed by DOJ and DHS, and numerous local, state, and federal law enforcement and criminal justice agencies and organizations Fusion Center Guidelines: Report contains 18 guidelines, recommendations, model policies, tools, and additional resources for establishing and operating fusion centers Developed collaboratively by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Global Initiative and Homeland Security Advisory Council were key players in the guideline development ISE Implementation Plan: Provides the structure for the future of information sharing Guidelines and requirements in support of the ISE Guideline 1—define common standards for sharing information within the ISE Guideline 2—develop a common framework for the sharing of information in the ISE Guideline 3—standardize procedures for sensitive but unclassified information Guideline 4—facilitate information sharing between executive departments and agencies and foreign partners Guideline 5—protect the information privacy rights and other legal rights of Americans
  • The National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan: Developed in 2003 by local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement officials Contains 28 recommendations and action items that provide agencies a blueprint for criminal intelligence sharing policies, procedures, standards, technologies and training Endorsed by DOJ and DHS, and numerous local, state, and federal law enforcement and criminal justice agencies and organizations Fusion Center Guidelines: Report contains 18 guidelines, recommendations, model policies, tools, and additional resources for establishing and operating fusion centers Developed collaboratively by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Global Initiative and Homeland Security Advisory Council were key players in the guideline development ISE Implementation Plan: Provides the structure for the future of information sharing Guidelines and requirements in support of the ISE Guideline 1—define common standards for sharing information within the ISE Guideline 2—develop a common framework for the sharing of information in the ISE Guideline 3—standardize procedures for sensitive but unclassified information Guideline 4—facilitate information sharing between executive departments and agencies and foreign partners Guideline 5—protect the information privacy rights and other legal rights of Americans
  • Partnerships between BJA/OJP/DOJ, DHS, FBI, ODNI, PM-ISE, and DOJ’s Global Initiative resulted in Four regional conferences held in late 2006 Deliverables included training, guidelines, tools, and resources 2007 National Fusion Center Conference Designed to support the President’s National Information Sharing Framework
  • 2008 National Fusion Center Conference scheduled for March 18–20, 2008 in San Francisco, California Planned topics include: Convening regional sessions to facilitate networking Strengthening sessions related to intelligence-led policing Tying in reports of suspicious activity with intelligence-led policing capabilities and fusion centers Evaluation of current information sharing methods to identify problems and potential solutions Providing a gallery of fusion center best practices
  • General Comments to the Presenter:   This new slide presentation and presenter guide delivers a somewhat different view of RISS from that known by many that have worked with RISS in the past. This is particularly true if the person has worked with RISS only in the 90s and not in the past year. This presenter guide provides points that should be emphasized during the presentation. Some of the more significant changes occurred in the months following 9-11-01. This presentation has been developed along with the presenter guide because the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) felt the correct and current message was not getting out to the state, local, and federal law enforcement members and potential members. A consistent message is needed about what RISS is today, especially with regard to how RISS is addressing and supporting law enforcement demands for rapid communications and sharing of terrorism information. Slide 1 – National Brand Name   The primary purpose of this slide is to get across the new message that RISS is a national program with a national brand name. To many members and non-members, the term “RISS” is pretty meaningless, and some members will not know what RISS is until the name of the center that they participate with is named. The message is that RISS will continue to be a series of regional centers acting regionally, but will think nationally and will produce products that have national scope and significance. An example of this would be an analytical product addressing terrorism throughout the country rather than one that addresses terrorism in one region only.
  • Slide 2 – RISS Geographical Regions   This slide represents the boundaries of the six RISS regions and the location of the center headquarters.
  • Slides 11, 12, 13 – Elements of the Program   These slides address the programmatic elements of the RISS Program as prescribed by BJA in the RISS Program Funding and Administration Guideline. Supporting investigative and prosecution efforts of member agencies has always been the basic premise of the RISS Program. Further, RISS provides a structured system for the exchange of information among member agencies throughout the country. It is often helpful to point out that law enforcement, left to its own devices, will not routinely share information – RISS is the structured vehicle that causes sharing to occur regularly.   Regional differences among the centers are a very necessary and critical part of the success of RISS. This recognition by BJA permits each RISS center to respond to the needs and requirements of their member agencies in their region of the country. This varies from region to region. Combined with the influence of policy boards selected from the membership on a regional basis, it is assured that RISS will concentrate on and respond to regional crime and information exchange problems. At the same time, they coordinate what they are doing as it relates to national issues and crime problems, and jointly produce products of a national interest and value.   Another factor that has been critical to RISS successes over the years is the prohibition from getting directly involved in law enforcement operations. This results in the next unique feature: there is no turf involvement with local, state, or federal law enforcement agencies.   While the regional differences permit each center to respond to regional needs, all provide the same service components of information sharing (databases and conferences), telecommunications (riss.net), analytical (intelligence analysis of member agency cases and proactive analysis of the center’s database and special projects), investigative support (loan of confidential funds), specialized equipment (pooling of expensive investigative equipment items for loan to member agencies), training (electronic delivery of training material on riss.net and regional training programs and conferences), and technical assistance (the field staff that regularly visits with member agency representatives).

Transcript

  • 1. Federal Funding, Standards, and Technology "Weaving Your Way Through the Web of Technology Conference 2008"
  • 2. Funding
  • 3. Federal Appropriations Process Timeline House and Senate appropriations committees mark up appropriations bills.   House and Senate floors vote on their respective appropriations bills. Leading appropriations committee members from both chambers reach a consensus on the appropriations bills, called a conference report.     House and Senate floors vote on appropriations conference report.   Appropriations bill sent to the President.   President signs or vetoes bill.   Congress passes continuing resolution if President does not sign bill by Oct. 1. House and Senate appropriations subcommittees develop appropriations bills.   Appropriations subcommittees report bills to appropriations committees. House and Senate floors vote on their respective budget resolutions.   Leading budget committee members from both chambers develop an agreement on the budget resolution.   Both Houses vote on the agreed budget resolution.   Budget resolution is reached. President submits his budget proposal to Congress.   House and Senate budget committees each formulate a budget resolution.   Federal agencies submit funding requests to OMB 2 years out. (e.g., In 2007, agencies submit requests for 2009.) June-October May March-April February September
  • 4.  
  • 5. Overall Funding Trends, BJA
  • 6. Distribution of FY2008 Funding
  • 7. FY 2008 Funding Levels (By category)
  • 8. Byrne Competitive Grant Program
  • 9. Byrne Discretionary Grant Program (Earmarks)
  • 10. Justice Assistance Grant Program
  • 11. Bulletproof Vests
  • 12. Capital Litigation
  • 13. Gang Prevention
  • 14. Offender Reentry
  • 15. Prescription Drug Monitoring
  • 16. Gun Violence Prosecution/ Project Safe Neighborhoods
  • 17. Training Programs to Assist Probation and Parole Officers (Sex Offender Management)
  • 18. Victim Notification System (SAVIN)
  • 19. When Seeking Funds
    • Did you respond to the established criteria of the RFP?
    • Did you have someone outside of the process proofread your proposal?
    • Are your leaders and target community supportive of the application, to include a formal Memorandum of Understanding?
    • Is your application clearly written and do the headings match the information requested in the RFP?
    • Do not assume the reviewer understands your needs.
    • Have you been timely?
  • 20. The “must have”
    • Executive Summary
        • NO MORE than 2 ½ pages
        • The problem
        • The solution (include methodology)
        • The time
        • The cost
    • The “elevator speech”
        • Ability to clearly state the project in a short amount of time
        • Convey the value; not only to you, but the masses (including that person)
    • Strong strategic champion
    • Know the difference between “start up” and “proof-of-concept”
  • 21. Why programs don’t get funded
    • Not meeting the guidelines
    • No clear mission or description of project
    • Failure to answer questions
    • Roles of partners not defined
    • Required partners not identified
    • Failure to follow directions
      • Length/spacing
      • Number of copies
      • Binding
      • Attachments
    • Deadline
    • Grant history
    • No performance measures
  • 22. National Initiatives
  • 23. Acronym Jungle NIEM PDMP RISS GLOBAL N-DEX R-DEX One DOJ FBI DHS GJXDM LEISP NSA ATF ICE SEARCH NDAA NW3C NGA LEITSC IACP DEA NCIS NSOPW NSOR SAR SAVIN Fusion Center IEPD
  • 24. National Initiatives
    • The National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan
    • National Strategy for Information Sharing
  • 25. National Initiatives
    • Information Sharing Environment (ISE) Implementation Plan
    • Fusion Center Guidelines
  • 26. What Is a Fusion Center?
    • Defined as a “collaborative effort of two or more agencies that provide resources, expertise, and information to the center with the goal of maximizing their ability to detect, prevent, investigate, and respond to criminal and terrorist activity”
    • State and major urban area fusion centers are key to the nationwide information sharing framework
  • 27. Why Is the Fusion Process Important?
    • Supports an all-sources, all-crimes, all-hazards, all-threats approach to intelligence
    • Blends data from different sources, including law enforcement, public safety, and the private sector
    • Supports risk-based, information-driven prevention, response, and consequence management programs
    • Supports intelligence-led policing
    • Fusion is the overarching process of managing the flow of information and intelligence across all levels and sectors of government and the private sector
  • 28. Current State of States
  • 29. Development of Formalized Regions
    • Formalized regions will
      • Promote interconnectivity
      • Leverage existing resources
      • Facilitate delivery of DHS/DOJ Fusion Process Training and Technical Assistance program offerings
    Northeast Southeast Midwest West
  • 30. Current Fusion Center Efforts
    • Designation of a primary fusion center within state
    • Nationwide assessment of fusion center capabilities by DHS and DOJ
    • Addressing use of National Guard personnel within fusion centers
    • National Information Exchange Model (NIEM)
    • Development of Regional Training and Technical Assistance
  • 31. Information sharing is a national imperative In detecting, preventing, responding to and investigating crimes, disasters and terrorist acts, the exchange of information among multiple engaged agencies must be timely and accurate and therefore highly automated . Most existing computer systems are not designed to facilitate information sharing across disciplines and jurisdictions. Automated information sharing between agencies requires the definition of common standards for linking disparate systems among federal, state, local and tribal agencies.
  • 32. NIEM IS:
    • A data standard
      • with agreed-upon terms, definitions , and formats.
    • Independent of the way data is stored in individual systems.
    • A way to achieve consensus on the content of specific exchanges
    • A structured approach to data interoperability
  • 33. Participating Communities and Governance Defining Data Components Defining data components unique to a domain will be done by subject matter experts who are representatives of the domain following basic rules for definitions and terms A group representing all participating domains will define those data components that are universal or commonly used by more than one domain again using the same basic rules
  • 34. How NIEM Works to Support Information Sharing
    • Create a scenario to define the need for information sharing between organizations
    • Define the requirements including the data components that should be included
    • Use the data component standards from NIEM to design the exchange, extending them where needed
    • Document the exchange using technology standards
    • Implement the exchange
    Scenario Planning Requirements Analysis Data Mapping Publish and Implement
  • 35. Federal Adoption and Use
    • OASIS Electronic Court Filing Technical Committee plans a 2008 release of IEPDs conformant with NIEM.
    • DOJ programs, such as LCMS and Sentinel, through their system design efforts are ensuring their exchanges will be NIEM-conformant.
    • DHS built a Hospital Availability IEPD and is planning or building 10 other NIEM-conformant IEPDs, including Federated Person Query and Terrorist Watchlist.
    • The Program Manager-Information Sharing Environment has declared that NIEM will be the standard for sharing counterterrorism information.
    • FBI has released the preliminary IEPD and schema for N-DEx consistent with release 2.0 of NIEM.
    • FBI has created an IEPD based on the planned interface between N-DEx and Sentinel.
    • FEMA has developed some specific NIEM-compliant schema – vetted through the NIEM Help Desk – for partner agencies at the federal, state, tribal and local levels to use for external data submission exchanges with the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) Toolkit.
  • 36. State & Local Adoption and Use
    • New York Division of Criminal Justice Services is utilizing NIEM to implement all CJIS information exchanges.
    • Florida is utilizing NIEM for all law enforcement information exchanges.
    • Pennsylvania JNET project is developing a plan for upgrading its installed GJXDM based information exchanges to NIEM.
    • Texas has begun to develop a plan for statewide adoption of NIEM as the standard for information exchanges.
    • Maryland Department of Transportation is exploring the use of NIEM for information exchanges between transportation centers and public safety.
    • California is planning to convert their court content management system interfaces to NIEM and to map their e-filing standard (2GEFS) to NIEM.
    • New York state and NLETS are developing a NIEM RAP Sheet pilot IEPD.
  • 37. Why NIEM Now?
      • 1. NIEM Is Tested, Ready, and in Production.
      • 2. Documentation and Tools Are Available.
      • 3. Training and Technical Assistance Are Available.
      • 4. A Release Plan Is in Place.
      • 5. Current and Future Grants Mandate NIEM Conformance.
      • 6. Reference IEPDs Are Being Developed.
      • 7. NIEM Is the Means for Intergovernmental Information Sharing.
  • 38. SAR Operational Study
    • Partnership between PM-ISE, DOJ, DHS, DOD
    • Minimum 3 locations to reflect fusion center, law enforcement, and military (force protection)
    • Two SAR (Suspicious Activity Report) elements
        • Summary SAR repository (without PII)
        • Connection of participants to share SAR (with PII)
    • Architecture specifically design to connect fusion centers allowing them to search SAR information
    • Intention to expand to all 50 states and UASI sites
  • 39. Summary SAR Library
  • 40.  
  • 41. Summary SAR Search
  • 42. Summary Suspicious Activity Report Search The document obtainable through this search engine are those produced by Fusion Centers and are designed to be summary in nature describing incidents/contacts/activity and do not contain person identifying information (PII), The documents searched are in a free text format such as MS Work, Adobe, WordPerfect. Etc. Enter single word, multiple words, or phrase:
    • For the most optimum results use the following format suggestions
    • MULTIPLE WORDS – use “+” sign between, ex. Truck +bridge +photos
    • PHRASE – for specific phrase enclose in quotation, ex. “green pickup”
    Select time frame of entered documents to be searched: SEARCH Between MO DAY YR 30 days 60 days 90 days ALL State
  • 43. RESULTS PAGE RETURN TO SEARCH NEW SEARCH 95% 85% 72% 50% 94% 20% Summary SAR Search STATE FUSION CENTER DATE ENTERED Match NY Albany 3/4/2007 VA Richmond 3/11/2008 VA Richmond 4/10/2008 IL Chicago 3/16/2008 FL FDLE 4/1/2008 FL FDLE 4/8/2008
  • 44. Contact Information New York State Intelligence Center Person submitting document Larry Jones, Intelligence Analyst 518-555-1234 [email_address] Contact for verifying information Lt. Mary Smith, Unit Commander 518-555-4321 [email_address] Summary SAR Search
  • 45. Summary Distributive Model
  • 46. SAR SBU Access Point SAR IEPD SEARCH PAGE RESULTSPAGE SAR SAR IEPD SAR SAR IEPD SEARCH RESPONSE
  • 47. What is 28 CFR Part 23?
    • 28 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 23 is a regulation governing interjurisdictional and multijurisdictional criminal intelligence systems
    • These are operated by or on behalf of state and local law enforcement agencies and that are funded with certain federal funds. 
    • It is a federal regulation issued by the U.S. Department of Justice in 1980, revised in 1993, and clarified in 1998 to address circumstances evolving with changing technologies and law enforcement needs. 
    • Is currently under revision review.
    • It is applicable to “criminal intelligence systems,” offering guidance on the collection, storage, and dissemination of criminal intelligence information. 
  • 48. Gangs
    • Maintaining the National Gang Center ( www.nationalgangcenter.org )
    • Conducted 2005 National Gang Threat Assessment with NAGIA, FBI, ATF, NDIC
    • Developing gang enforcement training for local law enforcement (basic, advanced, commander, CEO)
  • 49.  
  • 50. Regional Information Sharing Systems
  • 51. RISS Geographical Regions WSIN RMIN MOCIC ROCIC MAGLOCLEN NESPIN
  • 52. Elements of the Program
    • Supports investigative and prosecution efforts of member agencies
    • Structured system facilitates communication and cooperation among law enforcement agencies
    • Regional differences
    • Centers are prohibited from operational case involvement
    • No turf
  • 53. Membership Support Services
    • Service components
      • Information sharing
      • Telecommunications
      • Analytical
      • Investigative support
      • Specialized equipment
      • Training
      • Technical assistance (field staff)
  • 54. Summary of Support Services
      • Investigative and intelligence analysis support – RISS produced over 21,000 analytical products in FY2006. RISS creates link charts, telephone toll analysis, crime scene diagrams and other products. RISS also supports computer forensics and video and audio enhancements.
      • Equipment sharing – RISS loans over 4,500 pieces of specialized equipment annually.
      • Investigative funds support – RISS loans confidential funds to member agencies to support investigations, including purchase of services and contraband, as well as case travel and other assistance.
      • Criminal activity bulletins and publications – RISS produces almost 200 publications annually and distributes them to nearly 300,000 law enforcement personnel.
      • Training – In FY2006, more than 65,000 officers were trained.
      • Technical assistance – RISS field staff liaise with member agencies to ensure deliver of RISS services and to provide support regarding RISSNET installation and training.
  • 55. RISS Automated Trusted Information eXchange — (ATIX)
    • A vehicle for nationwide dissemination of national security information
    • Allows access to the secure network by non-RISS members
    • Includes Public Service, Public Safety, Public Utility, EMS, Governors, Mayors, Airport Security
    • States will usually manage ATIX tier access
  • 56. RISSafe
    • Designed to store and maintain data on all planned law enforcement events, (e.g., raids, controlled buys, surveillances)
    • Goal to identify and alert affected agencies of potential conflicts impacting law enforcement efforts.
    • Will be used in conjunction with mapping software, data on event locations will be verified when officers enter information into the system or when RISS staff members assist officers.
    • RISS staff at the Watch Center will assist officers, monitor activities, respond to conflicts, and notify affected parties
    • Currently in testing status and has funding for national implementation
  • 57. NEED TO KNOW
    • Where to find funding opportunities
      • www.grants.gov
    • Your representation at BJA
      • SAA (PCCD in PA)
      • Tracey Willis (State Policy Advisor for PA)
    • Byrne Solicitation to be posted soon
      • Preventing Crime and Drug Abuse
      • Enhancing Local Law Enforcement
      • Enhancing Local Courts
      • Enhancing Local Correction and Offender Re-entry
      • Facilitating Justice Information Sharing
  • 58. Mr. David P. Lewis Senior Policy Advisor Justice Information Sharing (202) 616-7829 [email_address] Questions?