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University of Mary Washington

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  • 1. University of Mary Washington REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507 CONSTRUCTION MANAGER @ RISK Renovation: Residence Halls PROJECT NUMBER: 215-17507
  • 2. REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Issue Date: November 16, 2009 RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507 Title: CM @ Risk – Renovation: Residence Halls Project Code: 215-17507 Issuing Agency & Address: Commonwealth of Virginia University of Mary Washington Office of Purchasing Centre Court, Suite 104 1671 Jefferson Davis Highway Fredericksburg, Virginia 24061 Location of Work: University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg Campus All inquiries for information should be directed to Melva A. H. Kishpaugh, VCO (540) 654-1084 IF PROPOSALS ARE MAILED, SEND DIRECTLY TO ISSUING AGENCY SHOWN ABOVE. IF PROPOSALS ARE HAND DELIVERED, DELIVER TO: Melva A. H. Kishpaugh, VCO University of Mary Washington Office of Purchasing Centre Court, Suite 104 1671 Jefferson Davis Highway Fredericksburg, Virginia 24061 Sealed proposals for furnishing the services described herein will be received until 2:00 p.m. local time on January 6, 2010. Proposals must reach the above address by the deadline stated. In compliance with this Request For Proposals, which includes the attached Table of Contents and all provisions and appendices attached and referenced therein, and subject to all the terms and conditions set forth herein, the undersigned offers and agrees to furnish the services described in the RFP cited above and submit this signed proposal which includes this completed and signed page, and other data as required by the RFP. It is understood that this proposal and the scope of services may be modified, by mutual agreement in subsequent negotiations. Name and Address Of Proposer: _________________________________ Date:____________________________ _________________________________ By_______________________________ (Signature in Ink) _________________________________ Typed Name:_______________________ _______________________Zip: Title:____________________________
  • 3. FEIN/SSN # _______________________ Telephone No.( ) _______________ PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE: A single non-mandatory pre-proposal conference will be held at 1:00 P.M. on Thursday, December 3, 2009 in the Lee Hall room 412 on the Fredericksburg Campus. Potential offerers are encouraged to attend. University representatives will be in attendance to answer questions. RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507 INSTRUCTIONS TO PROPOSERS The Owner reserves the right to cancel the Request for Proposals, to reject any and all proposals at its sole discretion when such rejection is in the interest of the Owner. NOTICE OF AWARD: The Notice of Award, the Notice of Intent to Award, or the Notice of Decision to Award will be posted at the Agency's standard location for posting notices. In addition the Agency may also post such notice on the Agency's website and/or the DGS central electronic procurement Website. CERTIFICATION: The Proposer, by his signature on the Proposal, certifies that neither his organization nor any of its officers, directors, partners or owners is currently barred from bidding on contracts by any Agency of the Commonwealth of Virginia, or any public body or agency of another state, or any agency of the federal government. ETHICS IN PUBLIC CONTRACTING: The provisions, requirements and prohibitions as contained in Title 2.2, Chapter 43, Article 6, §2.24367 et seq, Code of Virginia, as amended, pertaining to Proposers, offerers, contractors, and subcontractors are applicable to this project. BUILDING PERMITS: Because this is a Project of the Commonwealth of Virginia, codes or zoning ordinances of local political subdivisions do not apply. However, the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code shall apply to the Work and shall be administered by the Building Official for State owned Buildings. The Building Permit will be obtained and paid for by the Owner. All other permits, local license fees, business fees, taxes, or similar assessments imposed by the appropriate political subdivision shall be obtained and paid for by the Contractor. See Section 25 of the General Conditions for utility connection fees and services. SMALL, WOMEN, AND MINORITY-OWNED BUSINESSES SUBCONTRACTING AND EVIDENCE OF COMPLIANCE: Where it is practicable for any portion of the awarded contract to be subcontracted to other suppliers, the contractor is encouraged to offer such business to small, women, and/or minority-owned (SWAM) businesses. If SWAM subcontractors are used, the prime contractor agrees to report the use of SWAM subcontractors by providing the purchasing office at a minimum the following information: name of firm, phone number, total dollar amount subcontracted, category type (small, women, or minority-owned), and type of product/service provided. DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE REQUIRED: During the performance of this contract, the proposer/contractor agrees to (i) provide a drug-free workplace for the contractor's employees; (ii) post in conspicuous places, available to employees and applicants for employment, a statement notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance or marijuana is prohibited in the contractor's workplace and specifying the actions that will be taken against employees for violations of such prohibition; (iii) state in all solicitations or advertisements for employees placed by or on behalf of the contractor that the contractor maintains a drug-free workplace; and (iv) include the provisions of the foregoing clauses in every subcontract or purchase order of over $10,000, so that the provisions will be binding upon each subcontractor or vendor. For the purposes of this section, “drug-free workplace” means a site for the performance of work done in connection with a specific contract awarded to a contractor, the employees of whom are prohibited from
  • 4. engaging in the unlawful manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of any controlled substance or marijuana during the performance of the contract. Table of Contents Page Section I: Project Information 1 Section II: Scope of CM Services 3 Section III: Pre-Construction Fee and Guaranteed Maximum Price 15 Section IV: Proposal Submission Requirements 17 Section V: Evaluation and Award 20 Attachments: 1) Basis of Design Narrative (54pages) 2) Lump Sum General Conditions Items (1 page) 3) Cost Proposal Form (2 pages) 4) Contract Between Owner and Construction Manager for Pre- Construction Services (3 pages) 5) General Terms and Conditions for Pre-Construction Services (7 pages) 6) Contract Between Owner and Contractor DGS-30-064 (3 pages) 7) General Conditions of the Construction Contract DGS-30-054 8) Supplemental General Conditions – SWAM DGS-30-377 (1 page) 9) Project Cost Elements (7 pages) 10) Definitions for Small, Women and Minority-Owned (SWAM) Business (1 page) 11) Schematic Drawings (See attachment electronic PDF file)
  • 5. I. Project Information A. Purpose The purpose of this Request for Proposal is to procure the services of a Construction Manager (CM) who will team with the Owner and Project Designer (A/E) to successfully design and construct the proposed project entitled Renovation: Residence Halls. The CM will provide the services listed in Section II Part B of this RFP during the design phase. At a time designated by the Owner, the CM will be asked to develop a Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) which, once agreed to by the Owner, will form the basis of a construction contract between the Owner and CM for the completion of the project. B. Project Description and Budget This project involves the renovation of two residence halls: Mason and Randolph with small additions to address programmatic requirements. Mason and Randolph Halls, together totaling approximately 87,000 gross square feet, were built as dormitories in the 1950’s. Each hall is 5 stories, entered on the third floor from a green space framed by the two halls and connected by a two-story link that is mostly below grade on the green space side. The sloping site exposes all floors on the back and sides of the complex. Predominant exterior materials are red/orange brick with cast stone trim and painted wood double-hung windows. Roofs are low-slope with tall parapets comprised of brick and stone balustrades. A new one-story addition on top of the existing connecting link will feature a central pavilion with brick arches similar to existing porches on the end of each building. The pavilion will have a sloped roof and large cupola, admitting natural light to the central gathering space. Curving walls on each side of the pavilion, following the existing structure below, will be sheathed in window walls with painted synthetic wood trim. The addition will replace an existing terrace that is little-used and an ongoing source of leaks, despite repeated efforts to waterproof it. A new elevator and stairwell will be added to each hall. The renovation to Mason and Randolph Halls will include repairing exterior materials and replacing exterior windows and doors. All mechanical and electrical systems and most interior partitions will be demolished and replaced. New HVAC equipment and building envelope upgrades will significantly improve the buildings’ energy efficiency. 1
  • 6. The project is more fully described in the Basis of Design Narrative (Attachment 1). The construction budget is $28,000,000.00 C. Project Schedule The project is proposed to be completed in two phases. Phase I will be the renovation of Randolph Hall and include the proposed new 10,100 square foot addition to the link which connects to Mason Hall. Phase II will be the renovation to Mason Hall. Phase I is scheduled to begin in May of 2010 with a duration of eighteen months to complete. Phase II will begin in May of 2012 with a duration of fifteen months. 1. Design Schedule a) Schematic Design (August 2008 – October 2009) b) Schematic Review (October 2009 – November 2009) c) Design Development (November 2009 – February 2010) d) DD Review (February 2010 – March 2010) e) Construction Documents (March 2010 – July 2010) f) CD Review (July 2010 – August 2010) 2. Procurement of Construction Manager (CM) a) Issue Requests for Proposals (November 2009) b) Receive CM Proposals (January 2010) c) Interview CMs (January 2010) d) Select CM (February 2010) 3. Construction Manager Services a) Pre-Construction Services (February 2010 –May 2010) b) Prepare GMP (June 2010) c) Construction Services (July 2010 – June 2013) d) Warranty Period Services (January 2013 – August 2014) 2
  • 7. II. Scope of CM Services A. General Requirements 1. CM Team Description a) In general, the CM shall partner with the Owner and the A/E to work collaboratively during the design, construction and warranty periods to serve the needs of the project. b) The CM shall provide and maintain an experienced, professional team of individuals that is tailored to the size and complexity of this project, and who is capable of successfully managing the scope of services defined in this RFP. c) The CM for this project will be selected, in part, based on the individuals the CM has proposed for key roles during the preconstruction and construction phases. Upon selection, the CM shall agree to not reassign any of those individuals to other projects without written approval from the Owner. Requests by the CM to substitute any key personnel must be received by the Owner in writing and shall include the reason for substitution and background information on the proposed personnel consistent with the requirements set forth in Section IV of this RFP. 2. Separate Contracts for Pre-Construction and Construction Services a) It is the Owner’s intent to contract separately for preconstruction and construction services. The Contract and Contract General Conditions for each service is included as attachments to this RFP. b) The contract for Pre-Construction services shall be executed in accordance with Section V.D. of this RFP. c) The contract for Construction Services will be a Guaranteed Maximum Price contract and will be negotiated at a time designated by the Owner. In the event that the Owner and selected CM cannot agree on a GMP, the Owner reserves the right to negotiate and contract with the second ranked firm for Construction Services. 3
  • 8. B. Pre-Construction Services 1. Project Review and Consultation a) Upon selection, the CM will meet with the Owner and A/E to fully understand the Program, scope, design documents and all other pertinent aspects of the project. b) The CM shall attend regularly scheduled meetings with the Owner and/or A/E throughout the completion of the design phase. During these meetings, the CM will provide appropriate representation to advise the Owner and A/E on matters relating to site use and improvements, selection of materials, building methods, construction details, building systems & equipment, construction phasing and sequencing. 2. Value Analysis and Cost Estimate a) After reviewing the project program and available design documentation, the CM shall provide value analysis services and offer cost savings suggestions and best value recommendations to the Owner and A/E. Value analysis shall include life cycle cost analyses as well as “first time” cost savings. This information shall be provided in a report to the Owner and A/E which will be due within 30 days from the initial project review meeting. b) Based on available design documentation, the CM shall develop a construction cost estimate which is to be submitted to the Owner and A/E with the Value Analysis report indicated above. The cost estimate shall be summarized on a Building Cost Summary form (DGS-30-224) as referenced in Appendix E of the Commonwealth of Virginia Construction and Professional Services Manual (CPSM). The CM shall meet with the Owner and A/E to resolve any difference between the CM’s cost estimate and the latest cost estimates prepared by the A/E and Owner’s independent cost estimator. 4
  • 9. 3. Review of Design Documentation a) The CM shall thoroughly and continuously review the design documentation for clarity, completeness, constructability and coordination. b) The reviews shall be interdisciplinary and include both the construction drawings and specifications. c) Issues identified during the review process shall be conveyed to the A/E in writing and copied to the Owner. The conveyance shall provide a thorough description of the issue along with recommendations for resolving the issue. d) The CM shall maintain a running log of all issues noted during the review process and provide this information in the form of a report to the Owner at the time the design is considered complete. 4. Develop Project Schedule a) Within 30 days of signing the contract for pre- construction services, the CM shall provide an overall Project Schedule that adequately identifies all remaining design and pre-construction phase activities, general construction phase activities and appropriate project close out activities. b) The scheduling software used to produce the Project Schedule (MS Project, Primavera P3 or Primavera SureTrak) should also be used to develop the detailed construction schedule as defined in Section II. C.3 of the RFP and Section 19 of the General Conditions of the Construction Contract (Attachment 7). c) The Project Schedule shall be updated monthly until such time that the construction contract between the Owner and CM is executed. 5. Subcontractor Prequalification a) The CM shall pre-qualify all major subcontractors. Pre-qualification criteria shall generally comply with the Commonwealth of Virginia Standard Form for Contractor’s Statement of Qualification (DGS-30- 5
  • 10. 168). These criteria may be augmented by the CM with the Owner’s written approval. b) It is the intent of the Owner that all subcontractors meeting the pre-qualification criteria be allowed to bid on this project. c) The CM shall provide to the Owner a report which substantiates and justifies the CM’s recommendation to include or exclude each subcontractor who responds to the CM’s Request for Qualifications. 6. Prepare Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) a) At a time designated by the Owner, the CM shall prepare a Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) to construct the project. The components and requirements of the GMP are defined in Section III of this RFP. b) Should the GMP exceed the Owner’s budget for Construction as defined in Section I, at no additional cost to the Owner, the CM shall work jointly with the Owner and A/E to redesign the project as needed to meet the Construction budget while maximizing the project Program. The CM shall revise and resubmit the GMP for Owner review. c) The Owner reserves the right to accept or reject any GMP submitted by the CM at the Owner’s sole discretion. Should the Owner accept the GMP, the Owner will issue Notice of Award to the CM to initiate construction contract proceedings. C. Construction Services 1. Compliance with the General Conditions of the Construction Management Contract a) The attached General Conditions of the Construction Contact shall be included in the contract documents for construction services. The CM shall assume the role of the Contractor as defined in Section 1 of General Conditions. Various construction phase responsibilities of the Owner, CM and A/E are established therein. 6
  • 11. 2. Procurement of Trades Contracts a) At least ninety percent (90%) of the Cost of the Construction work must be procured through trades contractors via competitive sealed bids. The remaining ten percent (10%), or less, may be self-performed by the CM provided the CM’s price for the work can be demonstrated to be lower than competitive bids from trades contractors. b) Bids shall be accepted only from trades contractors who were pre-qualified in accordance with Section II.B.5 of this RFP. c) Prior to establishing the lowest responsive and responsible bidder for each trades contract, the CM shall meet with and thoroughly review the bid materials submitted by each apparent low bidder to ensure that the scope of work is fully understood and the bid amount is all-inclusive for the specified scope. d) All bid and contract documentation between the CM and trades contractors shall be made available at all times for review by the Owner. 3. Construction Schedule a) The construction phase schedule requirements are defined in Section 19 of the attached General Conditions of the Construction Contract. b) The Monthly Project Reports submitted with each pay request (Section 19d) shall consist of the approved construction schedule (or latest approved revision) that has been updated to indicate actual progress at the time of the submittal. The “as of” date (data date) for the update shall be no earlier than one week before the pay request meeting. If there are construction activities whose actual progress is less than what is projected on the approved schedule, a narrative report must also be submitted which lists the delayed activities and, where necessary, indicates how these activities will be expedited to avoid delaying the overall substantial completion date. A printed copy of the updated schedule and, if required, the narrative report must be submitted with each pay request. Review and approval 7
  • 12. of the Monthly Project Report is a prerequisite to the review and approval of the monthly pay request (Section 36a). Once approved, electronic record copies of Monthly Project Report shall be provided to the Owner. c) All CPM schedule activities shall be coded to allow for sorting by Phase, Trade and Building Location. The construction schedule shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, the following Schedule Activities as they apply to this project: a. Submittal and approval of required shop and coordination drawings b. Ordering, fabrication and delivery of major materials and equipment c. Pre-installation meetings d. Construction tasks (maximum duration for any activity is 20 days) e. Milestone start/completion dates for Owner activities that are NIC. f. Check-out, start up and test/balance or major equipment g. Milestones related to commissioning activities h. Submittal and approval of O&M Manuals i. Clean up and punch list j. Interim (i.e. pre-ceiling installation), Substantial Completion and Final Completion inspections k. Owner occupancy 4. Project Management & Control a) The CM shall maintain at the site an adequate and competent full-time staff approved by the Owner. Deletions and/or substitutions to the approved staff must be submitted in writing by the CM and approved in writing by the Owner. The CM staff shall manage the work of the trades contractors and coordinate the work with the activities and responsibilities of the Owner, A/E and CM so as to complete the project in accordance with the Owner’s objectives for quality, cost and time. b) The CM shall work jointly with the A/E to establish procedures that provide for the efficient and timely 8
  • 13. processing of Submittals, Requests for Information (RFIs) and Change Proposals. The CM shall develop and maintain status logs for all Submittals, RFIs and Change Proposals which shall be made available for review at all times by the Owner and A/E. c) The CM shall develop, implement and maintain programs to ensure project Safety and Quality. The programs shall be available for Owner review and input. The CM shall designate on site staff members responsible for ongoing safety and quality control inspections. 5. Meetings a) The CM shall conduct the Pre-Construction Meeting as defined in Section 50 of the General Conditions to the Construction Contract. The CM shall prepare and distribute the meeting agenda at least three days prior to the meeting. Within five days following the meeting, the CM shall prepare and distribute meeting minutes to all attendees. b) The CM shall conduct weekly (or more frequently when appropriate) Progress Meetings with all trades contractors. The meeting agenda shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, construction progress relative to the approved construction schedule, upcoming construction activities, the status of pertinent submittals, RFIs and Change Proposals and the results of construction safety and quality inspections performed by the CM, A/E and/or Owner. The progress meetings shall be open to A/E and Owner attendance. Within three days following each meeting, the CM shall prepare and distribute meeting minutes to the attendees, the A/E and designated Owner representative(s). c) The CM shall conduct semi-monthly Owner’s Meetings, one of which can also serve as the Monthly Pay Meeting. Meeting attendees shall include appropriate representation from the Owner, A/E, CM and trades contractors. Meeting agenda items shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, construction progress relative to the approved construction schedule, upcoming construction activities and pre-installation 9
  • 14. meetings, the status of pertinent Submittals, RFIs and Change Proposals and the results of construction safety and quality inspections by the CM, A/E and/or Owner. For the Monthly Pay Meeting, the agenda shall include pay request procedures as defined by Section 36 of the General Conditions of the Construction Contract. Within three days following each Owner Meeting the CM shall prepare and distribute meeting minutes to all attendees. d) The CM shall conduct Pre-Installation Meetings prior to commencing construction activities that involve multiple trades contractors and/or involve the installation of building systems (roof, stone veneer, fire alarm, etc.). Within thirty (30) days after award of the contract, the CM shall prepare a complete list of all required pre-installation meetings and review with the A/E and Owner. The listing and schedule for upcoming meetings will be reviewed at each progress meeting. The pre-installation meeting shall include representation from the CM, applicable trades contractors, the Owner’s inspection personnel, and when specifically requested, the A/E. The agenda for each pre-construction meeting shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, a discussion of the requirements of the contract documents, status of applicable submittals and shop drawings, manufacturer’s installation requirements, mock-ups, construction schedule constraints, weather constraints and follow up inspection procedures for quality assurance. Within three (3) days following each meeting, the CM shall prepare and distribute meeting minutes to the attendees, A/E, and designated Owner representatives. e) The CM shall attend along with mechanical, electrical, and building automation trades contractors, periodic Owner commissioning meetings. 6. Reports a) The CM shall prepare Daily Reports which include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following information: 1) Weather conditions 2) Construction Activities 10
  • 15. 3) CM and Trade Contractor manpower and equipment onsite 4) Visitors to the site 5) Tests/Inspections 6) Project issues (include photographs where applicable) b) The CM shall provide a Monthly Progress Report to the Owner that details actual construction progress versus planned progress. The report shall include labeled photographs which reflect the construction status. Copies of the CM’s Daily Reports for the month shall be attached to the Monthly Progress Report. c) The CM shall provide a Monthly Project Status Report to the Owner concurrent with the request for payment. The Monthly Project Status Report shall include the schedule information as referenced in Section II.C. 3.b of this RFP and Section 19 of the General Conditions of the Construction Management Contract, as well as the following: 1) Summary of the overall project status relative to the major schedule milestones 2) Activity Logs providing the status of all Submittals required by the contract documents 3) Activity Logs providing the status of all CM Requests for Information and Change Proposals 4) Summary of CM Safety and Quality Assurance inspections performed during the prior month 5) Log of Project Issues which could have a delaying impact on the construction schedule or cost impact to the GMP 6) Log of installation deviations from the Contract documents that have been noted on the CM’s as- built documents d) The CM shall maintain a deficiency log of any work items noted by the CM, Owner, or A/E as not meeting contract requirements. The log will include item number, description, action taken/current status/resolution, and open/closed. The log is to be reviewed at each progress meeting. 11
  • 16. 7. Building Operations a) Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Manuals 1. At least four months prior to the demonstration of equipment, the CM shall obtain and submit Operations and Maintenance manuals to the A/E for review and approval. 2. Three (3) complete sets of O&M manuals shall be provided in individually bound volumes as indicated below: a. Division 1-13 Architectural b. Division 14 Vertical Transportation c. Division 15 Heating, Ventilating, Cooling d. Division 15 Plumbing e. Division 15 Building Automation System f. Division 16 Electrical 3. Manual binders shall accommodate 8 ½ X 11 inch pages, and be heavy-duty three-ring type with the project name lettered on the spine. 4. All pages shall by 8 ½ X 11 inches. Larger pages, if used, shall be neatly folded to 8 ½ X 11 inches and be used as pullouts or foldouts. 5. As appropriate, each manual shall include: a. Names, addresses and responsibilities of all subcontractors, manufacturers, and suppliers who participated in the construction or who furnished materials and equipment. b. Complete maintenance instructions from the manufacturer’s local representative for each item of operable equipment as well as the name, address, and telephone number of the installing subcontractor. c. Catalog data on all items submitted and other pertinent data such as mortar colors, bricks selected, and color selections for all finished materials and fabrics. 12
  • 17. d. Catalog data on all plumbing fixtures, valves, water heaters, heating equipment, temperature controls, fans, electrical panels, service entrance equipment, light fixtures, similar equipment and systems. Manufacturer’s advertising or promotional literature is not acceptable. e. Manufacturer’s name, model number, service manual, spare parts lists, and descriptive literature for all components. f. Preventive maintenance instructions and schedules for all major equipment. g. List of most frequently encountered breakdowns and repairs. h. Instructions for starting and operating the actual system as installed. i. Detailed one-line, color-coded wiring diagrams. 6. At least six (6) month prior to Substantial Completion, the CM shall submit a listing by specification section of required O&M training (type and duration), spare parts/attic stock, and extended warranty requirements to facilitate a smooth transition. The CM, A/E, and Owner will meet to discuss the list and coordinate a schedule for the training. The CM will prepare a written agenda for each training session. a. Following O&M manual approval and within one (1) week of Substantial Completion, the CM, A/E, and Owner shall meet with the building occupants and maintenance personnel to turn over the O&M manuals, review the project punchlist, and turn over any ancillary items (paper towel dispenser keys, etc.). b. Commissioning 1. After startup and testing of each system has been completed, the Owner shall have an independent firm conduct detailed observations of the equipment and systems to confirm proper operations. 13
  • 18. 2. The CM and trades contractors shall include, as part of the work, costs to cover manpower, equipment, tools, ladders, instruments, etc., necessary to expedite the system performance observations. 3. The independent firm may develop systems, equipment checkout procedures and data forms for recording compliance of the systems to the Contract Documents, performance, and construction observation lists, and will assist in developing schedules for checkout and Owner acceptance. 4. The CM is to provide the Owner’s independent commissioning agent with copies of submittals, RFI’s, and change order proposals as they relate to commissioning activities. The CM is to also provide a response and action on commissioning issues listed and developed during construction. 5. The CM is to interact with the Owner’s independent commissioning agent before equipment startup and testing. The CM is to perform and complete installation verification and equipment startup checklists. 6. The CM is to respond to review comments developed by the independent commissioning agent after the commissioning agent’s review of O&M manuals and Owner training requirements and commissioning agent functional testing of the HVAC system. The CM is to work with the Owner’s commissioning agent to resolve outstanding issues related to these activities. c. The CM along with the mechanical and electrical trades contractor(s) will participate in post occupancy building walk thrus at 3, 6, and 9 months following Substantial Completion with the Owner and A/E. These walk-thrus are in addition to response to normal warranty calls. The CM will provide a list of all warranty calls received/status at the meeting. 14
  • 19. III. Pre-Construction Fee & Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) A. Pre-Construction Fee The Pre-Construction fee is separate and apart from all construction related fees and shall reflect the CM’s cost to provide the services outlined in Section II.B of this RFP. B. Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) 1. The Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) is generally defined as the sum of the following: a) Construction Manager’s Fee b) The General Conditions costs c) The Cost of the Construction Work d) Construction Management Contingency 2. See Project Cost Elements (Attachment 9) for a breakdown of various project costs. 3. The GMP cannot exceed the Owner’s construction budget as defined in Section I of this RFP. C. Construction Manager’s Fee The Construction Manager’s fee is generally defined as the amount included in the total construction cost (GMP) that compensates the CM for home office expenses, overhead, profit and general management of the contract during the construction phase. D. General Conditions 1. General Conditions costs are generally defined as the total compensation payable to the contractor for onsite supervision, inspections, coordination and managing of the work. The costs include all equipment, utilities, facilities, bonds, insurance and labor, including all mark ups. 2. The final General Conditions cost proposal shall be a fixed amount and shall be inclusive of the project scope as defined in this RFP. The General Conditions to be provided by the CM in the General Conditions cost proposal (Attachment 2 of this RFP) are considered limited in scope and not inclusive of all General 15
  • 20. Conditions required for the project. Proposed costs provided by the CM shall be used for evaluation purposes with final General Conditions to be determined after negotiations between Owner and selected CM in establishing the GMP. 3. The final General Conditions proposal is to be inclusive of both project site and home office costs required to execute the requirements for the project. 4. The final General Conditions proposal shall clearly identify any exceptions or exclusions to the general conditions requirements defined in this RFP, along with any proposed modifications. 5. The final General Conditions proposal shall include unit rates for all possible line items that would be used as a basis for an increase in the general conditions amount should a major change in the project scope of work take place. 6. The proposal must delineate each CM team member’s staffing costs. Such staffing costs must be represented as hourly rates reflecting direct salaries plus all burdens minus any markup for overhead and profit. Also to be included are the durations of assignment anticipated for each member of the team. E. Cost of the Construction Work 1. The cost of the construction work is generally defined as the direct costs of labor, materials, equipment, and associated costs of the trades/subcontracts which are incorporated into the completion of the project. 2. The CM may self-perform up to 10% of the Cost of the Construction Work provided the CM’s price for the work can be demonstrated to be lower than competitive bids from trades contractors. 3. Once trades bids are received by the CM, any “savings” in the actual Cost of the Work versus the Cost of the Work included in the approved GMP shall revert to the Owner and the GMP may be reduced accordingly. If the actual cost exceeds the amount for this component of the approved GMP, those costs shall be borne by the CM. 16
  • 21. F. Construction Management Contingency 1. The Construction Management Contingency is generally defined as that portion of the GMP set aside to address costs of the construction work that were reasonably unforeseen at the time the GMP was developed. The contingency may be used for 1) Scope gaps between trade contractors, 2) Contract default by a trades contractor, 3) Unforeseen field conditions, 4) Costs of corrective work not provided for elsewhere in the contract documents and 5) Design omissions which a prudent CM should reasonably have detected during the discharge of the CM’s preconstruction services. 2. The Construction Management contingency may be applied to any items within the Cost of the Work without the necessity of a change order, without constituting a change in the Work, and without resulting in any change in the GMP. The CM will notify the Owner in writing of the CM’s intent to apply any part of the Construction Management contingency to any item within the Cost of the Work prior to any such application. 3. Twenty five percent (25%) of any unspent Construction Management contingency at the completion of the project may be retained by the CM provided substantial completion was achieved in accordance with the approved construction schedule. The balance shall be returned to the Owner. IV. Proposal Submission Requirements A. General 1. In separate and clearly marked envelopes, submit one (1) original and six (6) copies of both a Technical Proposal and a Cost Proposal. 2. The requirements identified in this section of the RFP shall be considered minimum requirements. Failure to provide any of the requested information may render the proposal non responsive and therefore disqualify the proposer from further consideration. B. Technical Proposal 1. Proposed Team Members a) Submit any proposed changes to the project team listed in the proposer’s previously submitted Statement of 17
  • 22. Qualifications. Provide information on each individual as it pertains specifically to their experience in the renovation of student residence halls. b) Specify the percentage of time each team member is expected to spend on this project during the pre- construction and construction phases. c) Identify the direct responsibilities of each team member during the pre-construction and construction phases. At a minimum, CM responsibilities shall include those listed in Sections II.B and II.C of this RFP. d) Provide a statement from the Project Executive committing the proposed team members for the duration of the project. 2. Project Plan a) Provide the Cost Model used on one of the completed projects submitted in Section VI of the proposer’s previously submitted Statement of Qualifications and describe how this model was developed, updated and finalized to obtain the construction cost. Provide the Cost Model to be used on this project if different from the model referenced above. b) Describe the process by which value analysis is preformed so as to achieve an appropriate balance between costs, aesthetics, sustainable design and function. Provide a sample Value Analysis Report from a previous project. c) Describe the process by which design documentation is reviewed for clarity, completeness, constructability and coordination. Provide a report of deficiencies/issues resulting from the review of the design documentation of one of the completed projects submitted in Section VI of the proposer’s previously submitted Statement of Qualifications. d) Describe the process by which subcontractors will be pre- qualified. Identify all evaluation criteria used by the CM during the prequalification process. 18
  • 23. e) Identify the strategies that have been implemented successfully by the CM during the preconstruction and/or construction phases of previous projects to maximize the overall quality of the work. Provide specific examples where these strategies resulted in a higher quality finished product. f) Describe your firm’s approach and procedures for developing and updating the construction schedule. Identify all parties involved and their levels of involvement. Indicate strategies for securing subcontractor “buy-in” to the schedule submittals. g) Describe your firm’s approach and procedures for handling project Submittals and Requests for Information in a timely fashion. Provide a sample of the Activity Logs from a previous project that were used to track these items. h) Provide a sampling of project reports that have been provided on previous projects to help the Owner and other project teams members stay appraised of the project status and issues. i) Provide a 1-2 page description/outline of your firm’s approach and procedures for quality control/assurance. j) Provide a plan for subcontracting with Small, Women, and/or Minority-Owned (SWAM) businesses. Plan shall include goals (in percentage terms) for each category for which the CM plans to subcontract for in both the Pre- Construction and Construction contracts. If SWAM subcontractors are used, the prime contractor agrees to report the use of SWAM subcontractors by providing at a minimum the following information: name of firm, Virginia DMBE SWAM certification number, phone number, total dollar amount subcontracted, category type (small, women, or minority-owned), and type of product/service provided. Definitions for each category are listed in Attachment 10. Note that SWAM vendors must be certified with the Department of Minority Business Enterprise (DMBE). For further information: (http://www.dmbe.state.va.us). 19
  • 24. k) Provide any additional information on your firm that you feel makes your firm uniquely qualified to provide CM services on this project. C. Cost Proposal 1. Complete the attached Cost Proposal Form and submit the form in a sealed envelope separate from the Technical Proposal. V. Evaluation and Award A. Oral Presentation 1. Upon receipt of the proposals, the Owner will schedule a time with each respondent to provide an oral presentation to the Owner. The presentation including questions/discussions is expected to not exceed 1.5 hours in length. 2. The purpose of the presentations is to allow the Owner to meet the CM’s key personnel, discuss the RFP and to allow the CM to highlight selected areas of their proposal as they deem appropriate. 3. The oral presentation shall not involve negotiations of any proposed costs or fees. B. Selection Criteria 1. The Owner shall consider the following when evaluating the proposals: a) Demonstrated ability to successfully deliver a project of similar size and complexity pertaining specifically to renovation of student residence hall projects. b) Qualifications and experience of the CM’s key personnel assigned to this project with specific respect to renovation of student residence hall projects. 20
  • 25. c) References from Owners who are particularly knowledgeable of the project team members proposed by the CM. d) The CM’s proposed Costs and Fees. e) Demonstrated ability of the CM to successfully perform the preconstruction services as defined in this RFP. f) Demonstrated ability of the CM to successfully perform the construction services as defined in this RFP. g) Proposed participation by Small, Women, and Minority- Owned businesses (SWAM) as defined in this RFP. C. Contract Negotiations CM proposers shall be ranked by the Owner’s Selection Committee based on the evaluation criteria listed in Section V.B. The Owner shall enter into negotiations with the two top ranked firms. D. Award of Contracts 1. Upon completion of negotiations, the Owner shall execute a Pre- construction Services contract with the CM deemed by the selection committee to be the best suited for this project. 2. Upon successful completion of the Pre-construction services contract, the Owner shall enter into negotiations with the same firm for a GMP contract for Construction Services. Should the CM fail to perform the Pre-construction Services to the satisfaction of the Owner or should the Owner be unable to negotiate a GMP contract with the initial CM, the Owner reserves the right to negotiate with the second ranked firm for Construction Services. 21
  • 26. ATTACHMENT 1 Basis of Design Narrative Residence Hall Renovations The University of Mary Washington Fredericksburg, Virginia PC# 215-17507.001 Basis of Design Narrative Bowie Gridley Architects October 16, 2009 1
  • 27. Pg Table of Contents 3 1 Design Team 3 2 General Project Description 3 3 Capacity / Type of Occupancy / Functions 4 4 Proposed Building Site Location 5 5 Exterior Circulation Diagram 6 6 Program Summary Statement 6 7 Type of Construction Proposed 6 8 Outline Description of Basic Materials 14 9 Future Construction Accommodation 14 10 Style and Character of Building 15 11 Structural Design Criteria 19 12 Foundation System 19 13 Systems Descriptions 45 14 Area and Volume Calculations 46 15 Bed and Parking Counts 48 16 Preliminary LEED Checklist & Compliance Strategy 1 Design Team The following contributed to the development of this Basis of Design Narrative: 2
  • 28. Architect Bowie Gridley Architects / Washington, DC Civil Engineer Koontz-Bryant, P.C. / Richmond, VA Structural Engineer Robert Silman Associates / Washington, DC MEP Engineers RMF Engineering, Inc. / Baltimore, MD Fire Protection Engineers / Security The Protection Engineering Group / Chantilly, VA Landscape Architect: Mahan Rykiel Associates / Baltimore, MD Cost Estimating: DMS International, Inc. / Columbia, MD Hazmat Abatement Design: Froehling and Robertson, Inc. / Richmond, VA 2 General Project Description This project consists of renovations and additions to two similarly designed and constructed five-story dormitory buildings, Mason and Randolph Halls, located at the University of Mary Washington. The work is proposed in order to improve quality of residence life, life safety and provide accessibility. It will provide students with new gathering, study and teaching spaces, achieving the University’s goal of creating an active on-campus living-learning environment. The existing buildings, connected by a terrace on top of a 2-story structure or “connecting link”, are on a grade differential, with the campus quad side between the buildings almost two stories higher than the area to the rear, or east of the terrace. New construction will be added on top of, and adjacent to, the connecting link to house gathering spaces, new stairs and elevators and additional beds. The existing buildings are interconnected on the first and second floors, and will be interconnected on the third floor by the new addition. There is no connection between Randolph and Mason Halls on the fourth and fifth floors. The only documented modifications to the buildings are roof repair work completed in 1984, terrace waterproofing work done in 1999, and various system modifications such as fire alarms and plumbing fixture replacements. A recent study conducted by UMW found that, while the buildings are structurally sound, all major existing systems need to be replaced. The project includes a complete gut renovation of the existing buildings, including replacement of existing MEP systems. A new sprinkler and fire alarm system will be provided. Almost all partitions, ceilings and finishes will be replaced. All doors and windows will be replaced. 3
  • 29. The project will be LEED certified at the Silver level. A preliminary LEED checklist and explanatory notes are attached to the end of this narrative. 3 Capacity / Type of Occupancy / Functions The renovated facilities will house a total of 388 students. A resident advisor will live on each floor of each hall. Four apartments/efficiencies will be provided, two in Mason Hall and two in the connecting link. Two of these apartments will be designated for university faculty and two will be designated for building supervisors (students). The introduction of resident faculty will enhance the living-learning community by creating formal and informal opportunities for faculty and students to interact outside of the typical academic setting. Existing triple- and quadruple-occupancy rooms will be eliminated. The typical room will be double-occupancy with its own bathroom, a significant improvement over the existing bathrooms that are typically shared by four students, or more in the case of triples and quads. Each 2-bed room will accommodate a bed, desk, dresser and closet for each student. UMW’s furniture system facilitates lofting for varied configurations. Some dressers have been accommodated in the test-fit layouts by locating them under partially lofted beds. Dorm rooms have been designed to be very compact for economy, to accommodate existing column and window locations, and to encourage students to get out of their rooms and engage with other residents. Entrances to all dorm rooms will be accessible for disabled visitors except for rooms on the first and second floors where the existing floor level changes in the center of each floor. Fully accessible rooms will be provided on the third, fourth and fifth floors. All gathering, teaching and other common-use functions will be accessible. Gathering spaces include lounges, seminar rooms and study rooms for group and individual study. All gathering spaces within each hall will be available for use by all residents of that hall. Controlled entrances to each hall will provide full access for residents only. Internal circulation between Mason and Randolph, including the connecting link, will be re-opened and controlled. This will help facilitate shared use of the gathering spaces in the new third floor addition, building a stronger sense of community for the complex. The addition on top of the existing connecting link will include seminar rooms and a large gathering space that will be used by the wider university community as well as Mason and Randolph residents. This addition will facilitate maximizing bed count (and associated revenues) while providing ample spaces for studying and socializing by freeing up space within the existing buildings for dorm rooms. The addition’s central gathering space is designed to accommodate larger group meetings and activities as well as providing seating areas for smaller groups. The seminar rooms will be 4
  • 30. scheduled for various academic uses, including residence life programs, and will also be used for group study by Mason and Randolph residents, particularly at night. Access to these rooms will be controlled and monitored to assure proper use and protect audio- visual equipment located there. 4 Proposed Building Site Location Mason and Randolph Halls occupy a prominent site located near the main entrance to the UMW campus near its southern end. See map below – the building site is highlighted in gray: 5 Exterior Circulation Diagram The campus quad space between Mason and Randolph is directly adjacent to the main campus pedestrian circulation path. The buildings’ sitting creates a sense of containment for the quad space, similar to other nearby UMW buildings that have pedestrian pathways around the perimeter of the spaces between groups of buildings. The site development included with the project strengthens its relationship to the campus plan by enhancing the perimeter circulation and developing the open lawn in the center, a hub of outdoor activity for the students living in Mason and Randolph. It reinforces Mason and Randolph as a destination for residents and other members of the campus community coming to the new addition. Its relationship to the primary north / south pedestrian circulation path is consistent with, and builds upon, the existing pattern of nodes of activity along that path. Again, the project site is highlighted in grey: 5
  • 31. Vehicular circulation and parking will continue to be limited to the back and sides of the complex, along with site features requiring service such as dumpsters and mechanical and electrical equipment. The number of existing parking spaces will be maintained. Accessibility for the disabled to the buildings will be provided as part of the renovations. The new elevators at the east end of each hall will be easily reached from the parking area, including accessible parking spaces. New ramps will connect accessible routes on campus with the existing front entrance to each hall on floor 3 as well as the new addition. 6 Program Summary Statement The following chart summarizes the functional program accommodated by the renovated areas and new construction: 6
  • 32. 7 Type of Construction Proposed Both the existing and new construction is proposed to be classified as IIB (non- combustible / unprotected). The VUSBC type is IIB. 8 Outline Description of Basic Materials See Structural and Building Systems sections for additional information SCOPE OF EXTERIOR REPAIRS AND RENOVATIONS TO EXISTING BUILDINGS: 1. Replace spalled brick, repair cracks and re-point masonry 2. Replace damaged cast stone balusters at main roofs' parapets 3. Replace windows and doors 4. Rehabilitate Roofs A. Remove existing roofing materials (including asbestos-containing flashings) B. Construct dunnage, structural reinforcements, and curbs for new mechanical equipment C. Install new roof drains (new locations) D. Install new roof insulation, tapered to drains E. Install new roofing with all new flashings and accessories F. Seal stone parapet joints 5. Construct new mechanical equipment screens on top of existing roofs 7
  • 33. A. Brace new structure to existing structural frame below 6. Rehabilitate front porticoes (third floor entrances) A. Add new ramp B. Add fill on top of existing floor to make entrance accessible C. Add top step to accommodate new fill D. Replace balustrade E. Replace roofing, roof drains and accessories F. Install new handrails 7. Rehabilitate and enclose west porches (Additive Bids #2 and 3) A. Replace balustrade, cornice and wood columns (including temporary support) B. Replace roofing, roof drains and accessories C. Recondition existing decorative guardrails D. Replace spalled brick and re-point masonry joints E. Build-up porch floors to level with interior floors F. Install structural bracing G. Construct new in-fill partitions with triple hung windows at Floor 3 H. Install new windows in arched brick openings at Floor 2 I. Fur out and insulate walls at Floor 2 8. Repair and prepare existing terrace for new addition A. Remove abandoned stone fountain, balustrade, and edge banding B. Remove drainage course, waterproofing, and flashings C. Salvage stone paving and steps D. Remove mineral deposits from brickwork on west side E. Waterproof west side above and below grade 9. Paint existing wood trim to remain A. Encapsulate lead-based paint 10. See Building Material notes below for additional information. 8
  • 34. SCOPE OF INTERIOR RENOVATIONS TO EXISTING BUILDINGS: 1. Demolish toilet rooms, sinks, showers, and closets (salvage toilets and marble partitions) 2. Demolish partitions and other walls except at third floor entrance/lounge area and stair to remain 3. Demolish plaster ceilings except at third floor entrance/lounge area 4. Abate hazardous materials A. Remove vinyl asbestos floor tile and mastic B. Remove asbestos pipe insulation C. Encapsulate lead-based paint 5. Remove doors 6. Remove east existing stairs D. Demolish stairs and landings E. Fill existing window and exterior door openings with recessed brick to match existing F. Fill in floors level with adjacent floors 7. Replace plumbing system 8. Replace electrical system 9. Replace mechanical systems 10. Install sprinkler and fire alarm systems 11. Install security, data/telecom, CATV and AV systems 12. Fur out exterior walls and add insulation 13. Install partitions and ceilings 14. Install wheelchair lifts at main lounges 15. Convert rooms under third floor front porticoes to bicycle storage (part of Additive Bid #2) A. Demolish abandoned electrical equipment 9
  • 35. B. Excavate grade to Floor 2 level C. Saw-cut existing window opening down to floor level D. Provide opening for new exterior door E. Apply new brick veneer to previously sub-grade wall each side of door 16. Paint interior surfaces 17. See Building Material notes below for additional information. BUILDING MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS - EXTERIOR 1. Typical new masonry walls A. Brick: Standard Modular, color and type to match existing, running bond typical, with accents of special shape bricks in selected locations including jack arches over openings B. Masonry backup: 8” reinforced CMU walls & lintels with trowel-applied air barrier/vapor retarder C. Insulation: 2” extruded polystyrene in cavity D. Flashings: fabric-coated copper E. Cast stone trim: window sills, copings, water table, banding, caps and decorative headers over main entrance to third floor addition F. Trim, infill panels around windows, rake boards, fascias, and soffits: cellular PVC 2. New third floor addition curved walls and projecting bay on rear elevation A. Wall construction: fiberglass sheathing with high recycled content, 6” steel studs with R-19 fiberglass insulation and vapor retarding membrane B. Trim, infill panels around windows, rake boards, fascias, and soffits: cellular PVC C. Flashings: fabric-coated copper 3. Entrance to new third floor addition A. Site walls: brick with stone copings B. Fascias and trim: cellular PVC C. Ceiling: Exterior cement board with textured plaster finish D. Railings: Welded steel, painted, decorative 4. Existing exterior walls (floor to underside of deck above) 10
  • 36. A. Adhere 2” extruded polystyrene to interior surface of existing walls B. Inside adhered EPS, construct 3 5/8” metal stud walls, fill with R-11 foil-faced glass fiber batt insulation. C. Interior finish: fiberglass-faced, high impact-resistant gypsum board, painted 5. Existing west porches infill (Additive Bids #2 and 3) A. Columns and pilasters: cast fiberglass, factory finished B. Fascias, soffits, cornices, panels and trim: cellular PVC, to replicate existing where applicable C. Existing railings: remove, rehabilitate and re-install 6. Existing third floor entrances A. Columns and pilasters: existing cast stone B. New top step: granite to match existing C. Cornice and balustrade: cellular PVC to replicate existing D. Railings: Welded steel, painted, decorative 7. Doors and Windows A. Doors: solid core hardwood, stile and rail, painted, with applied moldings, panels and glazing, to match existing where applicable B. Door frames: steel with applied wood trim, painted C. Door hardware: institutional-grade, with intercoms and access controls per security narrative D. Windows: commercial grade clad wood, double hung, with screens, insulated argon-filled glass, and prefinished aluminum panning trim E. Door and window sills: cast stone, to match existing where applicable 8. New mechanical equipment screens on top of existing roofs A. Structural framing: steel tube sections, with posts down through existing concrete deck to new steel structure below B. Roofing: prefinished standing seam metal on pre-fabricated light-gauge framing with spikes and closures to discourage bird roosting 9. Low-slope roofing A. Membrane: 60 mil TPO, fully adhered (white), with compatible flashings and accessories B. Insulation: tapered polyisocyanurate, R-22 minimum, sloped to drains at ¼" per foot minimum 11
  • 37. C. Drainage: internal drains with overflow scuppers 10. High-slope roofing A. Metal roofing: Pre-finished (kynar-coated) steel high-seam tee B. Insulation: foil-faced fiberglass, R-22 BUILDING MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS – INTERIOR 1. Floor infill (at existing stairs to be removed) A. Concrete on metal deck 2. New Stairs A. Steps and landings: concrete-filled steel pans and treads with formed steel risers, steel channel stringers and landing headers, painted B. Soffits under landings: 5/8” gypsum board on metal stud framing, painted C. Enclosures under stairs: 5/8” gypsum board on 3 5/8” metal studs D. Railings: stained hardwood handrails on welded steel brackets; welded steel guard rails with stained hardwood caps, decorative infill panels, painted 3. Elevators A. Type: Traction, Machine-Room-Less B. Size: accommodate stretcher C. Features: accommodate accessible means of egress, 3500#, general purpose front opening 4. Floors, base and wainscots A. Typical, dorm bedrooms, closets and corridors: linoleum, 3-color pattern in corridors and lobbies, with 6” rubber base B. Faculty apartments, offices and lounges: carpet with 6” rubber base C. New stair: Rubber tread & riser covers, flooring on landings and 6” base D. Entry vestibules: heavy-gauge aluminum recessed walk-off grilles with slate surround and base E. Existing stairs: repair as required to match existing stone treads and base F. Main gathering space and corridors in new addition: stained hardwood flooring, base and wainscot 12
  • 38. G. Bathrooms, public toilets and janitor’s closets: ceramic mosaic tile with ceramic tile wainscot, 4’ high, 3-color patterned tile in public toilets H. Laundry and vending: rubber flooring and base 5. Partitions and wall finishes A. Dorm rooms, bathrooms and closets, typical: 6” CMU, painted, with demising walls tight to underside of deck B. Corridor walls: 6” CMU with skim coat plaster on corridor side, CMU to underside of deck, painted C. Gathering, study and seminar rooms in new addition: 3 5/8” steel studs with recycled natural cotton sound insulation, two layers 5/8” gypsum board each side to underside of deck, painted D. Existing third floor entrance/lounge areas: restore and paint existing plaster, woodwork and railings E. Faculty apartments, typical interior walls: 3 5/8” steel studs with 5/8” gypsum board each side, painted F. Interior paint: latex G. Interior stains and clear finishes: water-based 6. Ceilings A. Dorm rooms and closets, typical: suspended 5/8” gypsum board, with gypsum board dropped soffits on corridor end of room, painted B. Bathrooms: suspended 5/8” moisture-resistant gypsum board, painted. C. Corridors, lounges, study and seminar and rooms: combination suspended 5/8” gypsum board, painted, and suspended acoustical ceiling panels with tegular edge, 9/16” grid suspension system 7. Doors, frames and hardware A. Doors: solid core wood, flush, stained, AWI custom grade B. Frames: painted steel, welded C. Hardware: institutional grade, with access controls per security narrative 8. Miscellaneous A. Toilet partitions: solid plastic B. Shower enclosures: molded fiberglass C. Toilet accessories: stainless steel 13
  • 39. D. Grab bars: Stainless steel, 2 per handicapped toilet (public toilets and accessible dorm rooms) E. Fold-down handicapped seats, grab bar and shower spray unit with hose (one per each typical accessible dorm room) F. Shower enclosures and floor at roll-in handicapped showers: ceramic tile floors and walls G. Typical cabinets and millwork: AWI custom grade, wheat board, painted H. Window Stools: Solid surfacing material I. Closets in dorm rooms and faculty apartments: solid wood hanger rods with 11” deep painted wood shelf above J. Counter tops: solid surfacing material K. Laundry folding tables: plastic laminate tops supported by heavy-duty steel brackets and angles, painted L. Appliances (refrigerators, ranges, washing machines, dryers) and vending machines: Owner-furnished, Contractor-rough-in 9 Future Construction Accommodation There are no plans for any future construction and thus no accommodations have been made. 10 Style and Character of Building The existing buildings were designed in 1953 by the Richmond, Virginia architectural firm of Walford & Wright in the Neo-Georgian style and are very similar to each other in design. The predominant exterior materials are red / orange brick with painted white wood trim, double-hung wood windows, paneled wood doors, wood and stone columns, and balustrades of wood and cast stone. While not an historic landmark, Randolph and Mason Halls contribute significantly to the UMW campus’ traditional architectural fabric. The addition on top of, and adjacent to, the existing connecting link will be compatible with the Georgian style of the existing buildings in style and character. Its symmetry, proportions, details and materials will be in keeping with the existing while reducing maintenance through the use of modern materials in lieu of painted wood. 14
  • 40. Mason Hall main (third floor) entrance Randolph Hall main (third floor) entrance 11 Structural Design Criteria DESCRIPTION OF EXISTING STRUCTURE Based on the 1953 structural drawings by Walford & Wright, the buildings were constructed as a single structure, with a small expansion joint located in the terrace to accommodate some differential movement. 15
  • 41. Substructure Foundations for the building are spread footings, with slabs cast on-grade. The change in grade from the third floor quad (front) side to the back means the walls below the third floor at the quad side are concrete retaining walls. The courtyard fountain structure has significant foundations immediately adjacent to the terrace. Superstructure The superstructure consists of a mixed system of concrete framing, steel framing, and masonry bearing walls. On the ground floor level of each hall, floors are framed in concrete, with a pan-joist system supported on beams spanning to columns. Above the ground floor, steel floor framing consists of concrete slab on steel deck, supported on open-web steel joists which span to wide flange steel beams and columns. Note that at the ground floor of Randolph Hall, the quad side is framed with concrete framing as described above, while the back half of the building (south most) is framed in steel, similar to the upper floors. Composite brick and concrete masonry bearing walls support the open-web joists at the exterior walls. The quad side is framed in concrete. PROPOSED STRUCTURAL RENOVATION WORK Mechanical unit support at roof Mechanical air-handling units will be added to the existing roof. In addition, new mechanical equipment screens on top of the existing roofs will be installed around three sides of the air-handling units. The current open-web steel joists which frame the roof are not able to carry significant additional load. Therefore, to minimize impact on structure, new steel beams will be placed between the existing open web joists, with posts up through the roof to the required steel dunnage supporting the mechanical units above the roof. A similar scheme will be required to support the screen wall framing, as the screen wall will be subject to significant wind loads. At areas where the existing support girders and columns are currently at their maximum capacity, local reinforcing (for example, with field-welded steel plates) may be required. Unreinforced masonry may require some strengthening to carry new beam loads as well. New addition The addition of a floor over the existing terrace/connecting link structure will require careful integration with the mixed structural systems to avoid excessive negative impact. The new roof will have steel framing supported on new steel columns added through the existing structure. The new columns will be braced back to the existing floor framing at each level. Columns will be located within the footprint of the existing connecting link structure, and their locations will be carefully coordinated with the existing and new window locations at each floor. The column locations will also affect the existing pipe 16
  • 42. tunnel located within the connecting link and will be carefully coordinated with new piping. New spread footings will be required to support the new columns. The existing reinforced concrete retaining wall at the quad side is expected to be able to support new gravity loads and lateral loads along the long axis of the terrace structure; however the new lateral loads imposed on the system will require the addition of a below-grade lateral support for the short axis of the connecting link. The new lateral force resisting elements will consist of full-depth reinforced concrete foundation walls that will function as shear walls, to be located in the area where the foundations for the fountain are currently located. New dormitory rooms will be added at the fourth and fifth floor levels over each end of the connecting link. The structure of these additions will consist of a combination of steel framing and masonry bearing walls, similar to the systems described above. Vertical circulation towers The new stair and elevator towers at the east end of Mason and Randolph will require new systems for support of both gravity and lateral systems. While gravity systems could utilize either load-bearing reinforced masonry or steel framing with reinforced masonry infill, to maintain compatibility with the existing system, these additions will be framed in load bearing masonry, so the lateral stiffness of the new system is compatible with the existing system. The steel-framed option may be considered as an alternate approach. Effect of new work on existing building lateral and gravity systems The new addition has lateral load, both seismic and wind, to the existing building structure. However, these new structures also provide increased lateral resistance through both masonry and concrete shear walls. A more detailed review of the impact on existing building lateral system will be conducted to ensure the design does not exceed IEBC limits on increased lateral loading. The impact on the existing gravity system will remain under the IEBC limits with the added columns and bearing walls. STRUCTURAL DESIGN LIVE LOADS The design load criteria are described in the table below. Applicable The following codes and standards are applicable: Codes and a. Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (VUSBC) 2006 b. International Building Code (IBC) 2006 Standards The following structural design standards will be followed as specified by the governing codes: a. ASCE 7, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures. b. ACI 318, Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete. c. AISC 360, Specification for Structural Steel Buildings. 17
  • 43. d. ACI 530, Masonry Standards Joint Committee Code. e. Structural The following values are specified by the applicable codes and standards: Loading Occupancy or Use Live Loadings Uniform (psf) Concentrated (pounds) Offices & Corridors above First 100 2000 Floor Stairwells 100 Mechanical Room 150(1) Roof 20 (1) Will be used as a minimum by comparison to the estimated weight of mechanical equipment. (2) 15 psf miscellaneous ceiling and MEP loading at new drop ceilings. Wind V = 90 MPH Exposure B Iw = 1.15 Loading Seismic Seismic Design Category to be determined upon completion of Loading geotechnical investigation. Snow Pg = 30psf Ca = 1.0 Is = 1.2 Loading Vertical 1. Floor deflection under live load will not exceed 1/360 of span Deflection length. Criteria 2. Roof deflection under live or snow load will not exceed 1/240 of span length. 3. The floor live load deflection of beams supporting exterior wall elements will not exceed 3/8”. At beams supporting masonry walls, live load deflection will not exceed the least of 0.3” or 1/600 of span. Lateral 1. Exterior wall structural element deflections under the specified Deflection design load will not exceed 1/240 of span length. Criteria 2. Allowable story drift (seismic): 0.025 x story height. Vibration 1. Design issues and criteria related to floor vibration due to human Criteria activities are outlined in the AISC Design Guide #11, Floor Vibration Due to Human Activity. 2. Where vibrations are caused by running machinery, they should be isolated by damping devices on frame structure or by the use of independent foundations, as specified by the MEP consultant. Acoustic No acoustic performance requirements are assumed for the Criteria structure. 18
  • 44. 12 Foundation System GEOTECHNICAL CRITERIA A geotechnical investigation is underway which will confirm the bearing capacity of soils for new loads, possible additional capacity of existing footings, and lateral earth pressures, water proofing/drainage, etc. See Structural Design Criteria above for additional information. 13 Systems Description MECHANICAL SYSTEMS INTRODUCTION – HVAC / PLUMBING ENGINEERING The scope of work for the existing Randolph and Mason Halls is to provide a complete renovation. All mechanical and plumbing systems within the building will be replaced. There is an existing mechanical room in the lower level of Mason which also serves Randolph. This will be replaced by a new mechanical room in Randolph. This section summarizes the mechanical and plumbing systems and establishes the basic engineering design criteria for the facilities. It supplements codes which are applicable to the work being undertaken as well as those laws dealing with environmental protection, occupational safety and health. CODES AND STANDARDS All mechanical and plumbing systems will be designed and constructed to comply with the following codes and standards:  Construction and Professional Services Manual (CPSM)  Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code  Virginia Statewide Fire Prevention Code  2006 International Building Code  2006 International Mechanical Code  2006 International Plumbing Code  2006 International Fire Code  2006 International Fuel Gas Code  2006 International Energy Conservation Code  LEED for New Construction  ASHRAE Handbooks and Standards  ASHRAE 90.1, 2004  Environmental Protection Agency Regulations  Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS)  Applicable editions of National Fire Protection Association Standards (NFPA)  ASME A17.1-2000 Safety Codes for Elevators and Escalators with Addendums through A17.1b-2003 19
  • 45. DESIGN CRITERIA General: The heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems will be designed to produce the desired space temperature, humidity, pressurization and air quality conditions while employing the following design criteria. Outdoor Ambient Conditions 2003 ASHRAE Fundamentals Design (listed in CPSM) Location: Quantico MCAS, Virginia Fredericksburg, Virginia Winter: 16.2°F DB (99.6%) 6°F DB (Per CPSM) Wind Speed: 19.1 MPH (1%) 20 MPH Prevailing Wind Direction: 290° 290° Summer: 92.6°F DB/76.5°F WB (.4%) 93°F DB/77°F WB (Per CPSM) Daily Range: 17°F DB 17°F DB Indoor Design Conditions The following inside design temperature conditions are established by the CPSM. The buildings are considered residential occupancy and are state owned. Temperature will generally be controlled to plus or minus 2°F. Closer tolerances are noted accordingly. Mechanical and electrical rooms will be ventilated with outside air to 10 degrees above ambient conditions. Humidification for human comfort is not normally allowed by BCOM. Program Space Summer Winter Dormitory Rooms 78°F DB 70°F DB Storage 78°F DB 70°F DB Lounge 78°F DB 70°F DB Offices 78°F DB 70°F DB Classrooms/Lecture 78°F DB 70°F DB Mechanical equipment rooms 101°F DB 40°F DB Electrical equipment rooms 101°F DB 40°F DB VENTILATION CRITERIA Ventilation rates will be provided in accordance with the 2006 International Mechanical Code as outlined below. The occupancy density will be based on the formal program for the facility, the furniture/seating layout, or the values listed in the code, whichever is greater. Occupancy Outdoor Air Outdoor Air Based on 1000 Requirement Requirement 2 Program Space Square Feet CFM/Person CFM/ft Dormitory Rooms (Bedroom) 5 5 0.06 Offices 5 5 0.06 Storage 0 0 0 Lounge 25 .5 0.06 Classrooms 35 10 0.12 Conference Rooms 50 5 0.06 20
  • 46. Occupancy Outdoor Air Outdoor Air Based on 1000 Requirement Requirement 2 Program Space Square Feet CFM/Person CFM/ft Electrical equipment rooms 0 0 0 Mechanical equipment rooms 0 0 0 EXHAUST CRITERIA Air will be exhausted from all toilet rooms and janitor’s closets. Toilet room exhaust will be provided at a rate of 75 CFM per fixture or 10 air changes per hour, whichever is higher. Exhaust makeup air may be any combination of outdoor air and transfer air. Exhaust will be connected to the energy recovery air handling unit on the roof and will temper the incoming outside air. PRESSURIZATION CRITERIA Building air systems will be designed to achieve positive pressure and minimize infiltration. Air handling systems will return and/or exhaust approximately 5% less air than they are supplied in order to ensure a positively pressurized space. Air transfer rate will be set to maintain a reasonable differential airflow between differing occupancies. All public toilet rooms and janitor’s closets will be negative with respect to the corridor and internal occupied zones. FILTRATION CRITERIA All air systems will have filters with efficiencies no lower than what is indicated in the following table. Where two filter beds are indicated, the first bed will be located upstream of the air handling equipment and the second bed will be located downstream of the supply fan, coils and humidifiers. Filter efficiencies will be based on ASHRAE Standard 52.2. In order to obtain a LEED point for indoor environmental quality, MERV 13 will be used for occupied spaces in Randolph and Mason. Number of Filter MERV Rating - MERV Rating - Area Designation Beds Filter Bed No.1 Filter Bed No.2 Randolph and Mason 2 7 13 BUILDING OPERATING SCHEDULE All building areas are expected to normally operate for (24) hours, (7) days a week while school is in session. The University intends to use the buildings for summer sessions, so they must be capable of operating year round. The University also plans to incorporate a sequence for unoccupied setback mode. INTERNAL HEAT GAINS Equipment heat gains and occupancy loads for general use spaces will be as defined by the programming documents and Owner furnished load criteria. Equipment loads will be estimated at 2 watts per square foot for most spaces. Lighting levels will be set per the requirements set forth in ASHRAE 90.1. Estimated loads are as follows: General Lighting: 1.0 watts per square foot minimum or as required by lighting design General Equipment: 2.0 watts per square foot or as determined by specific 21
  • 47. equipment in each room Occupant Loads: Function Sensible and Latent Loads Dormitories, offices, 250 BTUH Sensible, 200 BTUH Latent (Based on classrooms, lounges moderately active office work) ENVELOPE LOAD CRITERIA Building block loads for heating and cooling loads will be based on the following criteria and adjusted as the design progresses. Roof U-Value (average) 0.03 BTU/(h*ft2*0F) Wall U-Value 0.07 BTU/(h*ft2*0F) Glass U-Value 0.3 BTU/(h*ft2*0F) Glass Shading Coefficient 0.5 INFRASTRUCTURE/UTILITY SYSTEMS General There is an existing mechanical equipment room located in the basement of Mason. 50-100 lb/hr steam from the central plant enters the mechanical equipment room where a pressure reducing station reduces it to a pressure of 15 lbs/hr. A steam converter and set of pumps allows heating water to be distributed to convectors in both Mason and Randolph. A domestic water generator utilizes steam to produce domestic hot water which is also distributed to both buildings. No chilled water system exists in these two buildings. The entire distribution system will be replaced. A new mechanical room will be located in the basement of Randolph and a new steam line will run from the manhole outside the building to the mechanical room. All equipment located in this new mechanical room will be sized to accommodate both buildings. Randolph and Mason have floor to floor heights at approximately 10 feet, so piping and ductwork distribution are expected to be challenging, and will require careful coordination between trades. HEATING SYSTEM Central plant steam at 50-100 lbs/hr is currently distributed through a tunnel and into the lower level of Mason. From there, a steam convertor allows heating water to be distributed throughout both buildings. All of the piping and equipment will be replaced. The new heating water system in Randolph will consist of a pressure reducing station, steam convertor, and two heating water distribution pumps. The pumps will serve the new fan-coil units, air handling units and unit heaters. HUMIDIFICATION/DEHUMIDIFICATION Humidification for human comfort is discouraged by BCOM and is not required for these dormitories. Dehumidification will be provided through the use of a chilled water coil in the make- up air unit. 22
  • 48. COOLING SYSTEM Two new air-cooled chillers will be located on grade adjacent to Randolph. The total estimated connected load for both buildings is 305 tons. The University wishes to size each chiller for 66% of the load, so two 200-ton high efficiency chillers will be used. All refrigerants must comply with LEED Energy and Atmosphere Prerequisite 3. Sound attenuation will be used on the air-cooled chillers. A new set of pumps located in the basement will distribute 42 degree water to the fan-coil units and air handling units. It is estimated that these pumps will be 610 GPM each. One of the two pumps will be stand-by. Two-way valves will be used on all coils, and variable speed drives in on the pumps in conjunction with a differential pressure sensor will control the flow. BUILDING DISTRIBUTION It is anticipated that a pair of heating and chilled water risers will run up to each floor and piping will run in the ceiling of each floor to the fan-coil units. This scheme will need to be evaluated further since the low floor to floor heights may require the use of more risers and limited piping in the ceilings. HEATING, VENTILATING, AND AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS General Randolph and Mason will be completely gutted, and new systems will be installed. Air Handling Units Two new air handling units will be located on the roof of both Randolph and Mason. The units will utilize a heat recovery device so that the bathroom exhaust air can temper the outside air. A separate unit will provide outside air for the connecting link. Space conditioning will be done by the fan-coil units. The units will provide 100% outdoor air to meet the ventilating criteria established by AHRAE 62.1 and maintain positive building pressure to offset code required toilet and general exhaust. The air handling units are of semi-custom quality construction: Air Handling Unit Description:  Approximately 6,000 CFM each (5 units total)  Semi-Custom designed, factory fabricated air handling unit with four (4) inch insulated metal casing  and factory and field leak test  Supply fan  Exhaust fan  Heat Pipe Coil  Heat Recovery wheel  Return air smoke detector and low leakage/isolation/smoke damper  Discharge air smoke detector with low leakage/isolation/smoke damper  Filter/Mixing section with low leakage dampers, MERV 7 pre-filter, and MERV 13 after filters  Balancing/isolation dampers on manifold branch ducts  Chilled water cooling coil with stainless steel casing and drain pan  Hot water preheat coil with coil circulating pump for freeze protection  Fan inlet side and discharge side sound attenuating devices Miscellaneous Heating and Air Conditioning 23
  • 49. Space conditioning for all rooms will be via 4-pipe fan-coil units. The typical dormitory room will contain a horizontal type unit located in a dropped ceiling off the corridor. A supply discharge grille will be aimed towards the windows of each room. Fin-tube radiators will be utilized in front of all large windows that span floor to ceiling. Split system DX units will be provided for telecom closets. Each unit is estimated to be 3-tons. All refrigerants must comply with LEED Energy and Atmosphere Prerequisite 3. AIR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM The supply air and exhaust air will be low pressure systems. Velocities in duct mains will be limited to 1500 feet per minute (FPM), and distribution ductwork will generally be below 1000 FPM. Ductwork will be constructed of ASTM grade, first quality galvanized steel of gauges as called for in the SMACNA Duct Manual. Combination Fire/Smoke dampers will be located in supply and return ductwork at the shaft wall interface. A separate duct system will allow fresh air from the air handling unit to be brought into each space. This will be accomplished with a small duct that branches off the duct main located in the hallway ceiling. Each individual space will have primary air distribution via supply air diffusers from fan-coil units. Diffuser selection will be coordinated with the architect to ensure that the spaces have the intended appearance. Concealed supply and outdoor air ductwork will be insulated with two (2) inch blanket type lightweight fiberglass duct insulation with vapor barrier facing. Exposed ductwork and ductwork located in shafts will have two (2) inch of board type fiberglass insulation with vapor barrier facing. Rooftop ductwork will be double-wall construction to help protect it from the weather In order to obtain a LEED point for Thermal Comfort, 50% of the building occupants will need control of the temperature. Fan-coil units in each room are expected to all this credit. PROCESS VENTILATION SYSTEMS All exhaust for Randolph, Mason and the connecting link will run up to the roof and back to the energy recovery air handling units. Ventilation fans will be used for the mechanical room in Randolph PLUMBING SYSTEMS Domestic Water Four inch domestic water service is currently supplied to the mechanical room in Mason Hall. As a part of this renovation, the domestic water service will be relocated to the new mechanical room to be located on the first floor of Randolph Hall. A reduced pressure backflow preventer will be provided at the water service entrance. In accordance with BCOM requirements, a new water meter will added to monitor water usage. This water meter will be readable by the Building Automation System. All of the domestic water piping within the building will be replaced due to corrosion and deterioration. All existing plumbing fixtures will removed. New distribution piping for the domestic cold water, hot water, and hot water recirculation will originate from new risers. These risers will be located at each cluster of bathrooms, in order to minimize the offsetting of piping. Branch take-offs for hot and cold water will be provided with shut-off valves. Water hammer arrestors will be provided for all toilet room/bathroom groups. 24
  • 50. Domestic Water Heating Domestic hot water is currently provided by steam hot water generator located in the Mason building mechanical room. As a part of this renovation, this generator will be replaced with a new steam hot water generator, to be located in the new Randolph building mechanical room. Sanitary Sewer Each building is served by its own 6” sanitary drain. These drains are adequately sized to accommodate the future demand and will remain. The University wishes to replace all sanitary and vent piping within the buildings due to corrosion and deterioration. All piping is to be replaced, excluding those mains that are below the slab. New below-slab branch piping will be required in several areas. A complete sanitary drainage and vent system will be provided for all fixtures located in the dormitories. New risers will be provided at each group of bathrooms, to minimize the offsetting piping. Storm Drainage Each building is served by its own 8” storm drain. These drains will remain, as the roof drainage areas are not expected to increase significantly. The storm drainage piping within the buildings will be replaced due to corrosion and deterioration. All roof drains and piping are to be replaced, excluding those mains that are below the slab. Roof overflow drainage is currently provided via scupper drains. These scuppers will be re-lined for reuse. Fan Coil Unit Condensate Drainage Condensate drainage from the fan coil units will be connected to the internal storm drainage system. Mechanical Make-up water Mechanical make-up water will be a nonpotable water system which is separated from the potable water supply with a reduced pressure backflow preventer. Mechanical make-up water will be used by the building system’s heating and cooling generating equipment for initial fill and operational losses. Plumbing Fixtures Plumbing fixtures in the dormitory rooms and public areas will be coordinated with architectural considerations and be constructed of vitreous china or a fixture of similar quality. In order to obtain two LEED points for Water Use Reduction, reduced-flow plumbing fixtures will be provided. Existing flush valves for all dormitory bathroom toilets were recently replaced and will be salvaged for re-use if possible. Additional investigation will be necessary to determine their suitability regarding LEED water use requirements. New plumbing fixtures will be provided throughout. Fixture trim will be consistent with the intended use. Plumbing fixtures will generally be as follows: Water closets – Vitreous China, floor mounted. Existing flush valves may be salvaged and reused, if appropriate. Lavatories - Vitreous China, wall or counter mounted, low flow (0.5 gpm) faucets, with mixing valve 25
  • 51. Kitchen Sinks – stainless steel, counter mounted Mop basins – molded stone or terrazzo Plumbing brass – Delta or Moen faucet type without ceramic disk as required (note: specifications will include a minimum of three equal products) Shower valves – Symmons safety mix, ADA approved (note: specifications will include a minimum of three equal products) Water fountains – Integral coolers with round dual bowls PIPING SYSTEMS Piping Materials Domestic cold and hot water piping will be seamless Type L copper water tube, ASTM B88, with wrought copper solder joint fittings. Piping will be insulated with 1 inch thick preformed fiberglass pipe insulation with all service jacket. Piping located in exposed spaces such as mechanical equipment rooms will be covered with canvas jacket. Sanitary and Storm Drainage Systems: Underground sanitary and storm drainage piping will be cast iron hub and spigot, service weight ASTM A74 piping and fittings. Above ground sanitary drainage and vent piping within the building will be cast iron, no-hub soil pipe and fittings, service weight ASTM-888. Chilled and Heating water piping will be seamless, Schedule 40 black steel piping with steel butt- welded fittings for two and a half (2 ½) inch and larger piping. Two (2) inch and smaller will have screwed fittings. Condensate drain and drain piping will be Schedule 40 PVC or soldered copper drainage tubing DWV. Insulation Materials Domestic and nonpotable water piping insulation will be one (1) inch heavy density fiberglass pipe insulation with vapor barrier jacket. Heating water supply and return piping insulation will be heavy density fiberglass pipe insulation with vapor barrier jacket. Piping smaller than two (2) inches will have an insulation thickness of one (1) inch. Piping two (2) inches and larger will have an insulation thickness of one and a half (1 ½) inch. Domestic water piping concealed in walls and cabinets will be insulated with closed cell elastomeric tubular insulation with built-in vapor barrier. Handicapped lavatory water and sanitary piping insulation will be one half (½) inch closed cell elastomeric tubular insulation with vapor barrier jacket. BUILDING AUTOMATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS A complete Direct Digital Control (DDC) system with electric or electronic actuators will be provided for all new mechanical equipment. New pieces of equipment will be checked for compatibility and connected into the existing campus automation system. The CCMS will monitor and control the air handling unit, fans, chillers, pumps, building heating, fan-coil units, domestic water and all miscellaneous mechanical equipment. Safety equipment for the building includes combination fire/smoke dampers at rated walls and shafts where applicable; smoke detectors to de-energize supply and returns fans only, and integrated fire alarm system. 26
  • 52. ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS INTRODUCTION – ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING The electrical scope of work for Randolph and Mason is to provide a complete renovation. All electrical power, lighting and telecom within the building will be replaced. A new electrical service will be provided to feed both Randolph and Mason buildings. The renovation includes a new main electrical room in the first floor of the connecting link between Randolph and Mason to serve both buildings. CODES AND STANDARDS All electrical work will be designed and constructed to comply with the following codes and standards:  Construction and Professional Services Manual (CPSM), Rev. 1, October 1, 2004  The Virginia Construction Code Part I of the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code - 2006 Edition  2006 International Building Code® (IBC)  2006 International Fire Code® (IFC)  2006 International Energy Conservation Code® (IECC)  NFPA 70: National Electrical Code® (NEC) 2008  Applicable Editions of National Fire Protection Association Standards (NFPA)  Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS)  Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA)  Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)  LEED for New Construction  International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) Volume III: Concepts and Options for Determining Energy Savings in New Construction, April, 2003  ANSI/ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2007 Energy Standard for Buildings  ASME A17.1-2007 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators  American Concrete Institute (ACI)  American National Standards Institute (ANSI)  Certified Ballast Manufacturers Association (CBM)  Edison Electric Institute (EEI)  Electronics Industry Association/ Telecommunications Industry Association (EIA/TIA)  Environmental Protection Agency Regulations (EPA)  Insulated Power Cable Engineers Association (IPCEA)  National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)  State of Virginia Department of General Services, Procedures for Implementation of Energy Conservation  Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. (UL) DESIGN CRITERIA The scope of work for the project includes the replacement of all electrical systems including power, lighting and special systems. The following is a listing of systems to be provided under electrical division: Secondary Feeder Ductbank from Pad-Mounted Transformer (transformer provided by utility company) Electrical Power Distribution System Receptacles and Equipment Connections Emergency Electrical System including on-site Generator Transient Voltage Surge Suppression 27
  • 53. Interior Lighting and Controls Emergency Lighting Exterior Site and Building Façade Lighting Telephone/Data Service Raceway Security System Raceway CATV System (conduit only) EXISTING CONDITIONS Randolph and Mason are currently served by one Dominion Virginia Power pad-mounted utility company transformer located at east corner of Randolph building. The existing transformer is 300 KVA with 208/120V, 3 phase, 4 wire secondary. The transformer also serves Marye House north of the Mason building. NORMAL POWER Electrical Service A new dedicated Dominion Virginia Power pad-mounted utility transformer will be provided for Randolph and Mason. The feeder will be run in new underground duct bank to the link between Randolph and Mason building and terminate in an indoor switchboard. The total connected load at 13.5 VA/SF is 1,400 KVA. The demand load is estimated to be 1195 KVA with an 85% diversity factor. A 1,200 KVA transformer is planned with a 4,000-Ampere main switchboard. Power Distribution System The main electrical room will be in the first floor of the link. The main switchboard, distribution panels and automatic transfer switch (ATS) will be located in the main electrical room. The electrical distribution system will consist of distribution panels fed from the main switchboard. The main switchboard will have phase loss protection. Distribution panelboards, feeders, standard and branch circuit panelboards will be utilized as necessary to supply electrical loads throughout the buildings. The following is a list of the unitary electrical loads utilized for preliminary sizing of the Randolph and Mason distribution system: Load Types VA/SF Lighting 1.0 Receptacles 2.5 Elevator 1.0 Miscellaneous 1.5 Mechanical 7.5 TOTAL 13.5 Voltage drop in the building will be limited to 2% for feeders and 3% for branch circuits for a maximum of 5% overall. Randolph and Mason will have two (2) branch panel risers in each building serving lighting and receptacle loads. Branch panel risers will have panelboards on each floor. Branch circuit panelboards will be stacked. 28
  • 54. Distribution panelboards will be provided in the main electrical room and throughout the building as necessary to supply equipment and branch circuit panelboards. Distribution panelboards will have copper bus, bolt-in breakers, and covers hinged to the back box. Branch circuit panelboards will be located throughout the building to serve the lighting, receptacle, equipment, mechanical, and miscellaneous loads. The branch circuit panelboards will be flush mounted in walls. All distribution feeders within the building will be copper with type THHN/THWN insulation and will be installed in electrical metallic tubing (EMT) with steel setscrew fittings. Connections to vibrating equipment will utilize sealtite, flexible metallic conduit. Final connections to lighting fixtures will be flexible metallic conduit. All branch circuits and feeders will have insulated ground conductors. All branch circuits will have dedicated neutrals; no shared neutrals will be permitted. ELECTRICAL DEVICES Receptacles will be 20 Amp, 125 Volt duplex grounding type, back and side wired with wide body design and a one piece back strap. Switches will be 20 Amp, 125 Volt back and side wired with wide body design FSUL WS 896-E and UL 20 approved. General purpose, specification grade receptacles will be provided in the following areas:  Student Residence Rooms, 8 ft on center  Offices, 12 ft on center, at least one per wall  Storage rooms  Electrical and mechanical rooms  Corridors, 50 ft on center for cleaning and maintenance  Lobbies, minimum of 3 receptacles  Restrooms, GFI type  Telecomm room 8 ft on center, at least one per wall  Roof, GFI type within 25 ft of all mechanical equipment  50A , 125/250V, ship-to-shore grade receptacles will be provided in front of Randolph and Mason. Miscellaneous mechanical equipment will be fed from 208-volt distribution panels or branch circuit panelboards as required. Motor starters for three-phase motors will be of the NEMA style VFD, and will be provided for each motor unless the starter is included with the specific equipment. Thermal manual motor starters will be provided for fractional horsepower motors. Miscellaneous equipment such as elevators will be supplied from 208-volt distribution panels as required. Motor loads will not be connected to room panelboards (computer loads). All three- phase motors and elevators will have single phase protected. A ground fault interrupter receptacle with weatherproof cover will be provided on the exterior of the building at each door. EMERGENCY POWER An emergency electrical power system is required to serve the following loads: Legally Required Standby Systems:  Egress and Exit Lighting  Fire Alarm System  Security System  Fire Pump  Elevator  Optional Standby Systems:  Telecommunications Equipment 29
  • 55.  Heating Water Pumps The following is a list of unitary emergency electrical loads used for preliminary sizing of the emergency electrical system components: Load Types Branch VA/SF Egress Lighting Life Safety 0.5 Fire Alarm Life Safety 0.1 Security System Life Safety 0.1 Fire Pump @ 40HP (if needed) Life Safety 0.5 Heating Water Pumps Equipment 0.1 (2) Elevators @ 50HP Equipment 1.0 TOTAL 2.3 The emergency connected load is 239KVA. The generator is planned to be 300 KW and will provide power at 208/120-volts, three-phase, four-wire. It will feed an Emergency Distribution Panel, rated 800-Amperes. The fuel source for the generator will be liquid propane gas. A liquid propane cylinder with 24 hours of run time will be included with the generator. A weatherproof, sound-attenuated enclosure will be provided for the generator by manufacturer. Automatic Transfer Switches (ATS) will be 4-pole enclosed sized as required for life safety and equipment branch. TRANSIENT VOLTAGE SURGE SUPRESSION Transient voltage surge suppression (TVSS) equipment will be provided in a “layered” protection scheme. The service switchboard will be protected with “service entrance” type devices, IEEE category C3 rated. Distribution circuit panels will be protected with “downstream” type equipment, IEEE category B3 rated. The individual floors branch circuit panelboards will have 200% neutral buses. The TVSS devices will be mounted in the distribution panels at the factory. POWER METERING AND MONITORING The main switchboard for Randolph and Mason will have digital metering similar to Square-D PowerLogic PM-650. (Note: specifications will include a minimum of three equal products.) Continuous metering equipment will be installed to obtain LEED Energy and Atmosphere Credit EA 5 Measurement and Verification. LIGHTING SYSTEMS Interior Lighting All interior spaces in the buildings will be provided with lighting fixtures designed to enhance the aesthetics and to provide illumination levels consistent with current standards as defined by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Handbook, Ninth Edition and ASHRAE/IES 90.1. In general, interior lighting fixtures will utilize fluorescent type light sources wherever practical. The fluorescent fixtures will utilize solid state electronic ballasts with programmed start and no more than 10% THD, and high efficiency T8, GE Starcoat, Ecolux, or Philips Alto series lamps. Fluorescent lamps will have a minimum color rendering index (CRI) of 78 and a color temperature of 3,500 Kelvin. Compact fluorescent fixtures will also be used where appropriate. Compact fluorescent lamps will have a minimum color rendering index (CRI) of 78 and a color temperature of 3,500 Kelvin. Where parabolic louvers are specified, they will be of the low iridescent type. Where acrylic lenses are specified, they will be 0.125 inch nominal thickness. 30
  • 56. Exit lights will be specified with energy efficient, non-visible type, light emitting diode (LED) sources. The exit signs will have red colored letters. Lighting in general will be wired to 120V lighting branch circuits. Fluorescent dimming ballasts for T8 lamps will be minimized. Where utilized, the electronic dimming ballast will dim the light levels down to 1% of full light output. Recess lights will be 32-watt PLT 4-pin. HID type luminaries will utilize high power factor (>90%) constant wattage ballasts. All metal halide lamps will be specified with interior coated lamps for color enhancement. Incandescent lighting sources will not be used. Lighting will be provided in accordance with LEED Energy and Atmosphere prerequisite EA p2 Minimum Energy Performance. Lighting will comply with ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. A list of the various lighting fixture types, utilization areas, recommended average maintained illumination levels, etc. is provided in Table below: Lighting Space Description Level (FC) Lighting Description Student Rooms 20-40 Recessed fluorescent 2 x 4 troffer with acrylic prismatic lens Study Rooms 40-50 Recessed fluorescent 2 x 4 troffer with acrylic prismatic lens Active Lounge Rooms 20-50 Recessed fluorescent 2 x 4 troffer with acrylic prismatic lens Main Lounges 10-30 Recessed compact fluorescent downlights with alzak reflector and pendant mounted compact fluorescent decorative fixture Seminar Rooms 40-50 Recessed 2 x 4 fluorescent troffer with acrylic prismatic lens Kitchen 40-50 Recessed 2 x 4 fluorescent troffer with acrylic prismatic lens and recessed compact fluorescent downlight with clear alzak reflector Faculty Apartment 20-50 Recessed 2 x 4 fluorescent troffer with acrylic prismatic lens and recessed compact fluorescent downlight with clear alzak reflector Offices 40-50 Recessed 2 x 4 fluorescent troffer with acrylic prismatic lens Toilets 10-20 Recessed fluorescent trough with parabolic louver mounted continuous above sinks and toilets. Recessed compact fluorescent downlights. Downlights will be supplied from the emergency electrical system Laundry 20-50 Recessed 2 x 4 fluorescent troffer with acrylic prismatic lens Mechanical and Electrical 20-40 Pendant mounted fluorescent industrial fixture with wireguard, and baked white enamel finish Telecommunications 50 Surface mounted fluorescent industrial fixture with wireguard, and 31
  • 57. Lighting Space Description Level (FC) Lighting Description baked white enamel finish Corridors 5-15 Recessed 2 x 4 fluorescent direct/indirect /or recessed fluorescent downlights or wall mounted fixtures Stairs 5-15 Surface mounted fluorescent fixture with vandal resistant, impact resistant acrylic lens Storage Rooms 5-10 Surface mounted 2 x 4, 1 x 4, or 2 x 2 fluorescent troffer with acrylic lens. Lighting Controls In order to obtain LEED Indoor Environmental Quality Credit EQ 6.1 Controllability of Systems: Lighting; Individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of the building occupants will be provided to enable adjustments to suit individual task needs and preferences. Lighting system controllability for all shared multi-occupant spaces to enable lighting adjustment will meet group needs and preferences. In general, localized switching will be provided in all rooms. Occupancy sensors and timers will be provided in various rooms for energy savings. Areas with significant daylight contributions will be equipped with photocells for automatic deactivation of the lighting in the room when the daylight contribution is sufficient for the room occupancy. EMERGENCY LIGHTING Emergency lighting will be provided throughout the facility and will utilize the designated lighting fixtures supplied from the emergency electrical system. Fluorescent fixtures will be directly connected to the emergency lighting circuits. EXTERIOR SITE LIGHTING Exterior walkway lighting fixtures, circuiting, and poles will be provided as needed. Lighting fixtures will match existing campus standards. Total of 36 recessed lights are estimated for exterior stairs, steps, ramps, walkways and retaining walls. The facade lighting for the building will be limited to floodlights and decorative sconces at the main entrances. Facade lighting will utilize a metal halide source. Controls for the exterior and facade lighting will be through photo cells. These fixtures will have circuiting such that they may be controlled in groups of the same type of fixtures. Therefore, groups of lights can have different on-off flexibility. GROUNDING SYSTEMS The grounding system will comply with all requirements of Article 250 of the NEC, 2008. A grounding grid will be provided around the perimeter of the main electrical rooms, the emergency generator, and the Telephone/LAN rooms. The grounding grid will consist of a #4/0 AWG bare stranded copper grounding conductor and 0.75-inch diameter by 10 foot long copper clad steel ground rods installed 20 ft on center. The ground grid will be buried a minimum of 12-inches in undisturbed earth below grade. Connections made below slab will be exothermically welded. 32
  • 58. Ground connections will be extended to the main water service. Copper ground buses 24” x 2” x 0.25” will be provided on two opposite walls 12-inch AFF in the main electrical room, and the main telephone BDF (building distribution frame) room. The ground buses will be interconnected to the ground grid with #4/0AWG conductor. All connections to the ground bus will be bolted. A ground riser will be provided through the electrical panels on each floor for connection and sensitive equipment. A 12” x 2” x 0.25” copper ground bus will be provided in each closet. The main BDF room will have a ground grid, which will be tied to the power ground grid. The grounding system will meet EIA/TIA 607 requirements. A ground riser will be provided throughout the IDF closets. TELECOMMUNICATION SYSTEM The building will have conduit for horizontal UTP cabling installed for all voice and data outlets and coaxial for audio/visual applications. Each floor of Mason and Randolph will have its own dedicated telecommunications IDF room to house equipment. Multi-mode fiber optical cabling conduit will run from each intermediate distribution frame room within the building back to the main distribution frame room, which will be located on the first floor of Mason next to the electrical room. The electrical room will not contain any transformers. The building main distribution frame room will serve as the service entrance room for the building as well. Coaxial cabling conduit will be installed for video applications and will home run from the outlet to the main distribution frame room. All cabling will be provided by others. The building will be connected with multi-mode and single-mode fiber optical cabling. Service Entrance (SE) - This is the point where telecommunications lines and cables enter the building. The following specifications for the service entrance room are required: Minimum of four 4” conduits will be installed with two unused 4” conduits remaining. All entry conduits will be labeled TELCO USE ONLY. SE’s and cable pathways will be located away from all sources of electromagnetic interference. Fire suppression systems for all of these rooms will be two-stage water systems. Pipes will be insulated to prevent water condensation from forming, and possibly damaging telecommunications equipment. Fire suppression system pipes will not be installed directly over equipment, but rather placed near the walls with the manifold pipes in ceiling corners. Cable tray will be provided in corridors sized as required to accommodate the number of outlets installed on each floor with 25% spare capacity. Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) - These are located one on each floor of the building, at the end of the area where the existing stairs will be removed. All walls will be covered with 3/4 inch A-C fire retardant plywood. Cable trays will be located along all four walls of the room mounted no less than 84” above the finished floor and no more than 92” above the finished floor. Conduit requirements: Conduit sleeves between floors interconnecting rooms will be stubbed 4” above the finished floor to prevent water leakage through to the lower floor. A minimum of four 4” conduits will be provided between IDF rooms on different floors. All rooms will be connected back to the BDF with a minimum of four 4” conduits. Electrical requirements: BDFs will be provided with the following: 33
  • 59. Two 208v/30a dedicated circuits each with NEMA L6-30 outlets. Two 120v/30a dedicated circuits each with NEMA L5-30 outlets. Two 120v/20a dedicated circuits each with quad 20amp outlets. IDFs will be provided with the following: Two 120v/30a dedicated circuits each with NEMA L5-30 outlets. Two 120v/20a dedicated circuits each with quad 20amp outlets. Grounding and bonding will follow grounding and bonding requirements specified in TIA/EIA 607- 1994, Commercial Building Grounding and Bonding Requirements for Telecommunications. Telephone, data and CATV outlets will be provided as follows: two outlets per dorm room, two outlets per study room, one outlet per each 100 SF of lounge or seminar room space. Cable will be unshielded twisted pair (UTP) horizontal station copper cable supporting voice and data communications requirements, as well as Emergency, Courtesy and Pay Telephones will be Category 6 and meet or exceed the specifications listed in the University of Mary Washington Networking and Telecommunications Cabling Standards document. Specifications of note include: All UTP cabling intended for data applications will have a blue colored outer jacket. All UTP cabling intended for voice applications will have a gray colored outer jacket. Fiber optic cabling inside building fiber riser cabling (building backbone) will be 50 µm Multimode fibers optimized for 10 gigabit applications terminated on LC connectors. Outlets will accommodate a minimum of six (6) modular jacks. The typical outlet will house a minimum of two terminated data jacks (RJ45). Conduit rough-ins for AV systems will provided in seminar rooms, study and lounge spaces. FIRE PROTECTION / SECURITY SYSTEMS BUILDING DESCRIPTION For the purpose of the fire protection and security analysis, Randolph and Manson Halls are considered one building. Each hall will contain two stairwells and one elevator which will also serve the connecting link. APPLICABLE CODES AND STANDARDS  2006 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (VUSBC) with 2006 Supplement.  2006 International Mechanical Code (IMC).  NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, 2007 Edition  NFPA 14, Standard for the Installation of Standpipe and Hose Systems, 2007 Edition  NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code, 2007 Edition AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEMS 34
  • 60. An automatic sprinkler system, installed in accordance with NFPA 13, will be provided throughout the building. The building will be provided with wet-pipe systems throughout consisting of quick response sprinklers. Standard response sprinklers rated at 212 degrees Fahrenheit will be provided in the elevator shaft and elevator machine room. In addition, temperatures within all areas of the building, except the exterior bike storage area, will be maintained above 40 degrees Fahrenheit. It is anticipated that the exterior bike storage area will be provided with dry sidewall sprinklers, fed off from a wet pipe sprinkler system. Zoning NFPA 13 8.2.1 limits the maximum area per sprinkler zone to 52,000 square feet for Light and Ordinary Hazard occupancies. The approximate area of the largest floors of the building (including Randolph and Mason Halls and the connecting link) is approximately 24,500 square feet. However, for simplicity and hydraulic purposes on floors 1-3 two sprinkler zones will be provided. On floors 4-5, one sprinkler zone will be provided within each hall. Therefore, on each floor, one zone control valve assembly will be located in one of the stairwells of Randolph Hall and one zone control valve assembly will be located in one of the stairwells of Mason Hall. A total of 10 zone control valve assemblies will be provided for this building. Each zone control assembly will be provided with a water flow switch connected to the facility’s fire alarm system. The zone control valves for each zone will be provided with a valve supervisory switch for monitoring by the building’s fire alarm system. In addition, off from the first floor sprinkler zone in each of Randolph and Mason Halls, a valve and waterflow switch will be provided for the sprinkler line serving the sprinklers in the elevator machine room and bottom of elevator shaft. Activation of this waterflow switch will initiate elevator shunt trip immediately, without any time delay, via fire alarm programming. Hazard Classifications Randolph and Mason Halls mainly consist of dormitory rooms. In addition, there are support spaces which consist of communal lounge areas, mechanical and electrical spaces, supply closets, laundry rooms and bike storage areas. The following table summarizes the hazard classifications and corresponding sprinkler system densities, hose stream requirements, design areas and maximum coverage area per sprinkler based on the requirements of NFPA 13. • Light Hazard Occupancy NFPA 13 Figure 11.2.3.1.1 Density: 0.10 gpm/ft2 over 1,500ft2. NFPA 13 Table 11.2.3.1.2 Hose Stream: 100 gpm NFPA 13 5.2 Use: Dormitory rooms and other similar low combustible areas. • Ordinary Hazard Group 1 Occupancy NFPA 13 Figure 11.2.3.1.1 Density: 0.15 gpm/ft2 over 1,500ft2. 35
  • 61. NFPA 13 Table 11.2.3.1.2 Hose Stream: 250 gpm NFPA 13 5.3.1 Use: Mechanical rooms, Electrical rooms, Laundry rooms. • Ordinary Hazard Group 2 Occupancy NFPA 13 Figure 11.2.3.1.1 Density: 0.20 gpm/ft2 over 1,500ft2. NFPA 13 Table 11.2.3.1.2 Hose Stream: 250 gpm NFPA 13 5.3.1 Use: Storage rooms, including Bike storage area. Extra Hazard occupancies will not be present in the building. Standpipe System A Class I standpipe system will be provided in the building as the building as the highest story of the building is greater than 30 feet above the lowest level of fire department access and is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with NFPA 13 (VUSBC 905.3.1, Exception 1). However, since the distance from the lowest level of fire department access to the highest story is less than 150 feet, the system is permitted to be manual; i.e. the municipal water supply does not need to support the standpipe demand. Fire hose valves will be installed within the building at the following locations, in accordance with VUSBC 905.4:  In every required stairway, a hose connection will be provided for each floor level above or below grade.  An additional hose connection will be provided at the top of the most hydraulically remote standpipe for testing purposes. NFPA 14 requires that the fire hose valves be located on the intermediate stair landings. As such, a dedicated riser will be provided in each stairwell to serve the fire hose valves. A summary of risers is as follows: Randolph Hall Stair 1: One 4 or 6 inch riser for sprinkler valve assemblies One 4 or 6 inch riser for fire hose valves. Randolph Hall Stair 2: One 4 or 6 inch riser for fire hose valves. Mason Hall Stair 1: One 4 or 6 inch riser for sprinkler valve assemblies One 4 or 6 inch riser for fire hose valves. Mason Hall Stair 2: One 4 or 6 inch riser for fire hose valves. Supervision 36
  • 62. All valves controlling the water supply for the automatic sprinkler systems and water- flow switches on all sprinkler systems will be electrically supervised. An alarm device will be provided on the exterior of the building in an approved location. Actuation of the automatic sprinkler system water flow switches will also actuate the building fire alarm system. Fire Protection Water Supply The current water supply information being utilized for the hydraulic analysis is based on a water flow test performed September 11, 2009 by the Protection Engineering Group. This water flow test yielded a static pressure of 60 psi, residual pressure of 36 psi with a flow of 742 gpm. The flow hydrant was located behind the building (hydrant #632) and the gauge hydrant was located toward the front of the building (hydrant #263). Two computer generated hydraulic calculations were performed in order to aid in determining whether or not a fire pump will be required for the building. The first hydraulic calculation was performed on the fifth floor of Mason Hall. This hydraulic calculation made the following assumptions:  6 inch backflow preventer  6 inch fire service into the “fire pump” room  4 inch feed main through the first floor level to the stairwells  4 inch riser in the stairwells  One 3 inch zone control valve assembly in one of the stairwells for fifth floor Mason Hall  3 inch cross main down corridor to serve sprinklers on this floor  900 square foot remote area with a sprinkler density of 0.1 gpm / square foot  100 gpm inside hose stream The resulting calculation indicated a sprinkler demand (at the test hydrant) of 293 gpm at 53 psi. The municipal water supply can provide 293 gpm at 55.5 psi. Therefore there is a 2.5 psi safety factor. Typically a safety factor of 5-10 psi is required. It is important to note that factors such as pipe sizes can affect the sprinkler demand. For instance, increasing the 4 inch feed main on the first floor and 4 inch riser n the stairwell to 6 inches would yield a sprinkler demand of 293 gpm at 46.5 psi. This would result increase the safety factor to 9 psi. However, important factors such as sufficient ceiling clearance is required in order to route a 6 inch feed main through the first floor which may be problematic. Therefore, for the purpose of this analysis, a worst case is assumed of a 4 inch feed main through the first floor and 4 inch risers. As such, a fire pump would most likely be required. The second hydraulic calculation was performed on the second floor of Mason Hall in the area around the bike storage. This hydraulic calculation made the following assumptions:  6 inch backflow preventer  6 inch fire service into the “fire pump” room 37
  • 63.  4 inch feed main through the first floor level to the stairwells  4 inch riser in the stairwells  One 3 inch zone control valve assembly in one of the stairwells for second floor Mason Hall  3 inch cross main down corridor to serve sprinklers on this floor  900 square foot remote area with a sprinkler density of 0.2 gpm / square foot  250 gpm total hose stream (100 gpm inside, 150 gpm outside) The resulting calculation indicated a sprinkler demand (at the test hydrant) of 480 gpm at 51.5 psi. The municipal water supply can provide 480 gpm at 49 psi. Therefore there is a 2.5 psi deficiency. Increasing the 4 inch feed main on the first floor and 4 inch riser in the stairwell to 6 inches would yield a sprinkler demand of 480 gpm at 43.5 psi. This would result increase the safety factor to 5.5 psi. As indicated above, for the purpose of this analysis, a worst case is assumed of a 4 inch feed main through the first floor and 4 inch risers. As such, a fire pump would most likely be required. Based on the hydraulic analysis above, a fire pump rated 500 gpm at 40 psi is recommended. A fire pump this size would require a 20 horsepower motor. An emergency generator will be required. It is important to note that providing a fire pump would assist with minimizing the sprinkler piping sizes. For instance, the sprinkler feed main through the first floor and risers in the stairwells can remain 4 inches with use of a fire pump. In addition, the sprinkler cross mains routed along the corridor on each floor can be approximately 2½ inches with use of a fire pump. Minimizing the cross main sizes to 2½ inches will certainty be beneficial given the existing building’s limited floor-to-floor height. One fire department connection (FDC) will be required in accordance with VUSBC 912.1. A freestanding FDC will be provided near the front (quad side) of the building within 100 feet of a fire hydrant. This FDC will consist of four 2½ inch hose connection. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM All components of the existing fire alarm system (both initiating and notification appliances) will be removed. A new automatic fire alarm and notification system will be provided in accordance with VUSBC 907.2. Both audible (horns) and visual notification appliances (strobes) will be provided in accordance with NFPA 72. Per direction from the University of Mary Washington, the fire alarm control panel (FACP) will be EST-3 (sole sourced at the University). All appliances provided will be listed and compatible with EST-3 FACP. Based on the University standards, the fire alarm and security systems will be integrated together. The University design standards have required that EST-3 Synergy be provided for both fire alarm and intrusion detection (refer to Electronic Security System section below). Manual Fire Alarm System 38
  • 64. A manual fire alarm system consisting of manual pull stations is not required per VUSBA 907.2.2. However, it is intended that manual pull stations will be provided as an additional safety measure in accordance with NFPA 72. Manual pull stations will be located such that they are provided within five feet of the entrance to each exit. Additional pull stations will be provided as necessary such that the maximum travel distance to a pull station does not exceed 200 feet. All pull stations will be mounted between 42 and 48 inches above finished floor in accordance with the VUSBC, NFPA 72 and Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) requirements. Automatic Detection System In accordance with the project requirements, analysis of the locations where smoke detection is required is based on both a R-1 and R-2 occupancy. Automatic smoke detection will be provided the following areas:  Elevator lobbies and elevator machine rooms (NFPA 72 6.16.3)  In the return of air handling units with capacities greater than 2,000 cfm (IMC 606.2.1)  At the connection to a vertical duct or riser serving two or more stories from a return duct or plenum of an air handling system (IMC 606.2.2)  Throughout all interior corridors serving dormitory rooms (VUSBC 907.2.8.2) Single-station smoke alarms will be provided within each sleeping room in accordance with VUSBC 907.2.10.1.2 Activation of a heat detector or smoke sensor within the elevator lobby will initiate elevator recall. Each heat detector provided will be rated 135 degrees Fahrenheit. Notification Rooms that are classified as ADA accessible rooms will be provided with notification throughout in accordance with ADA guidelines and NFPA 72. Fire alarm notification will be provided in accordance with VUSBC Sections 907.2 and 907.9 and NFPA 72. Audible notification will consist of horns. Audible notification will be provided throughout all occupied spaces within the building in accordance with VUSBC 907.9.2. The audible signal will be designed such that the alarm sound will be at a level 15 dB above the ambient noise level. Visual notification will be provided in all areas required by VUSBC 907.9.1. The visual notification will consist of ADA compliant strobe devices. These devices will be provided in all public/common areas. Visual notification will not be provided in all dormitory rooms. The strobes will be spaced in accordance with NFPA 72. Where practical notification appliances will be ceiling mounted. Wall mounted visual notification appliances will be mounted with the lens between 80 and 96 inches above finished floor. 39
  • 65. An electronic bell will be provided on the exterior wall of the building, and programmed to activate only upon sprinkler water flow. Fire Protection System Supervision The fire alarm system will be connected to the fire protection systems in order to monitor valve positions and water flow alarms as required by VUSBC 903.4. These devices will be connected to the fire alarm system via addressable interface devices. Equipment The fire alarm control panel will be provided in the main entrance. The specific location will be coordinated with the local fire department and the University. Supplemental equipment such as notification appliance panels will be provided in the mechanical room. Zoning VUSBC 907.8 requires that each floor be zoned separately and that a zone may not exceed 22,500 square feet. Furthermore, the length of each zone may not exceed 300 feet in any direction, with the exception of sprinkler zones which may coincide with the allowable area of sprinkler systems. Based on the floor areas of the building, two zones will be required per floor. The fire alarm zones will be matched with that of the sprinkler zones. Monitoring VUSBC 907.14 requires that the fire alarm system be monitored by an approved supervising station. The fire alarm system will be connected to a central station service via a digital alarm communication transmitter (DACT) that will be located adjacent to the main fire alarm control panel. Security Interface An addressable relay module, connected to the fire alarm control panel, will be provided at the security panel to disconnect lock power to the applicable exit doors during a fire alarm. SECURITY SYSTEM Administrative Notes 40
  • 66. For ease of understanding the design approach, the document is separated by functional areas of security. Some generalities have been made to account for fluctuations in risk factors. A holistic approach to the design of the physical protective system will be used as follows.  Apply Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles to the architectural components.  Apply electronic security to bridge the gap between the planned operations of the facility while ensuring flexibility to accommodate changes to facility operations. Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design or CPTED focuses on the positive use of a space and natural elements to maintain a desirable quality of life for intended users, while increasing the difficulty for criminal or abnormal activities. This is a well-founded concept dating back to the 1960s. The principles focus on the positive use of space to create designs that attract users because they feel safe, while simultaneously making it unattractive and difficult for criminals. Various case studies document its effectiveness in reducing campus crime, street crime, burglaries, and other conventional crimes, both domestically and internationally. There are three design principles that include territoriality, natural surveillance, and natural access control. Territoriality Territoriality clearly defines an area physically or psychologically in order to create an environment where the sense of ownership by site users is such that would-be aggressors are challenged if their behavior is abnormal, such as unusual loitering or other unauthorized activities. Pavement patterns, low walls to form an enclosure or separate an area, and even signage are examples of applications of CPTED to establish territoriality. The following are some ways the design team may leverage territoriality for this project.  Use territoriality to define the space and establish a sense of ownership by installing barriers such as low knee walls, CPTED fencing, and low hedges “hostile vegetation”. Additionally, establish site amenities to encourage appropriate use by intended users (students, faculty, and staff).  Provide trash receptacles in areas of intended pedestrian use to ensure the site maintains a kept appearance.  Apply polyurethane paints that reflect light and graffiti resistant.  Specify vines or planted wall coverings to deter graffiti. Natural Surveillance Natural Surveillance allows good visibility in and around the site to limit hiding places for criminal activities. The concept is to see and be seen; Criminals do not like to be seen and guests feel safer when they are seen. Coordination of window and doors with walkway layouts, layout of parking lots with travel ways perpendicular to the buildings, 41
  • 67. and the sitting of security assets by placing facility personnel where they have clear line of sight can achieve this. The following are some ways the design team may leverage natural surveillance for this project.  Develop uniform well-lit pedestrian walkways by installing 10-12 foot tall pedestrian lighting.  Utilizing windows generously throughout the facility to increase surveillance opportunities.  Provide exterior maintained lighting levels of 3-5 foot candles and no less than 2.0 foot candles maintained lighting level to all parking and pedestrian areas.  Use cut off fixtures with diffusers to focus the lighting where needed to minimize or eliminate light trespass.  Roadway lighting should meet 0.5 foot candle minimum maintained lighting level.  Keep vegetation such as shrubs below 3 feet in height or a minimum of 3 feet away from pedestrian pathways to remove opportunities for concealment.  Keep tree branches at least 7 feet and in most places 10 feet off the ground to provide clear line of sight corridors. Natural Access Control Natural Access Control is about using site and building layout and design elements to easily direct guests in an orderly fashion from one location to another while reinforcing territoriality and aiding natural surveillance. The following are some ways the design team may leverage natural access control for this project.  Limiting the number of entrances to the buildings  Clearly define pedestrian pathways. Electronic Security Systems This section addresses standards associated with the selection, application, and performance of electronic security systems (ESS). The ESS includes the Physical Access Control System (PACS); Intrusion Detection System (IDS); Video Assessment and Surveillance System (VASS); and Intercommunications System. Physical Access Control System The PACS will:  Control access to the facility perimeter and critical utilities.  Grant access to authorized personnel based on an individual’s authorized access level and time restrictions.  Be able to allow access to the new third floor addition main entrance to the wider university community during daytime hours and, if needed, limit access to residents during nighttime hours.  Provide permission based automated access control system to grant real-time access.  Be sole sourced as an AMAG Synergy system to integrate with the University’s existing system. Egress for Access Controlled Doors 42
  • 68. In accordance with Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, system function will be such that the Access Control System allows “free egress” from inside of rooms at all times. “Free egress” means any egress door, not just the doors from “inside of rooms”, can be immediately opened and unlocked by simply turning the accessible hardware lever on the doors or pushing an exit device. Fire Protection Systems Integration The power supply units for electronic, electromechanical, and electromagnetic locking devices will contain a dedicated relay integrated with the fire alarm control panel (FACP). Intrusion Detection System Areas with high valued and/or easily pilfered assets will be equipped with intrusion detection devices as follows.  Provide automated detection and immediate notification of unauthorized access to spaces housing servers.  Provide automated detection and immediate notification of unauthorized removal of high value AV equipment.  Intrusion detection sensors will be integrated following industry standard best practices as part of the PACS. Video Assessment and Surveillance System The proposed VASS (aka CCTV) will be integrated and compatible with the existing system. Provide security video of persons entering facility entrances and exits with resolution of no less than 40 pixels per linear foot. House exterior cameras in a vandal and weather resistant dome enclosures when mounted below 10-feet above grade. The anticipated lighting levels must be within the exterior cameras normal operating range. Exterior cameras must function and operate normally within the anticipated lighting levels of the locations installed. Record video at a rate of 7.5 images per second (IPS). Interface the video system with the access control / intrusion detection system to provide alarm actuated video call-up. Record alarm actuated video at 30 images per second (IPS) starting 15 seconds before the alarm event occurs and lasting one minute after the alarm is cleared. 43
  • 69. The system must display the appropriate image and alarm at the console within 1 second of alarm activation. Provide no less than 30-days of video storage. Intercommunication System (ICS) Intercommunications devices will be used to improve communications around the facility between isolated areas or potential areas where communication improvements are desired. Based on the need of communication, devices will be either intercom type systems or emergency call boxes.  Provide an intercom at each entrance to the facility.  Provide Emergency Call Boxes within 150 feet of any point of an exterior area intended for pedestrian use. Security Space Requirements Security Main Distribution Frame (MDF)  Security requires 64 square feet of wall space and floor space for two (2) equipment racks 22 inches wide x 32 inches deep x 78 inches high. University standards require this to be separate from the telecommunications MDF.  Security requires at least three (3) 20-amp emergency power circuits. All field security panels will be provided with battery backup.  The MDF will be supported by emergency power and UPS to support a seamless transition between power sources as well as support the load for 30 minutes. Security Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF)  Security requires 32 square feet of wall space within 280 feet of any point on a floor.  University standards require this to be separate from the telecommunications IDF.  Security requires at least one (1) 20-amp emergency power circuit at each location. All field security panels will be provided with battery backup. Air Conditioning  Security equipment requires HVAC on emergency power to maintain safe operating temperatures.  The required BTU for this equipment will be based on product selection, quantity required, and expansion capability. 44
  • 70. 14 Area and Volume Calculations The following calculations are based upon criteria stated in the CPSM. I. INTERIOR Area With Area With Area With Total Non- BUILDING Clear Clear Clear Assign- Assign- SPACE Adjusted Height Height Height able able (GSF) > 6'-8" < 6'-8" < 6'-8" Area Area Area (Adjusted) c=bx a b (AAF) d=a+c e f=d-e - Service Tunnel 0 1,826 913 913 0 0 - Floor 1 12,794 10,441 0 12,794 5,123 7,671 - Floor 2 25,073 0 0 25,073 14,593 10,480 - Floor 3 24,567 0 0 24,567 14,926 9,641 - Floor 4 20,238 0 0 20,238 12,695 7,543 - Floor 5 20,238 0 0 20,238 12,695 7,543 - Roof Level 1,086 0 0 1,086 0 1,086 GROSS BUILDING AREA 104,909 60,032 43,964 II. BUILDING EFFICIENCY Assign- FACTOR able 60,032 = 0.572 Total 104,909 III. EXTERIOR Measured Adjustment Adjusted SPACE Exterior Exterior Factor Area Area - Covered Area 2319 1 2,319 - Roof Terrace 0 0 0 - Exterior Stairs 669 0 0 SUBTOTAL OF EXTERIOR SPACES 2,319 45
  • 71. IV. TOTAL AREA FOR PROJECT SCOPE 107,228 BUILDING VOLUME Total Floor Floor Floor Area Height Volume a b axb - Service Tunnel 1826 4 7,304 - Floor 1 12,794 10 127,940 - Floor 2 25,073 10 250,730 - Floor 3 24,567 10.75 264,095 - Floor 4 20,238 10 202,380 - Floor 5 20,238 10 202,380 - Roof Level 1,086 10 10,860 BUILDING cubic 1,065,689 VOLUME feet 15 Bed and Parking Counts BED COUNT Mason Hall will accommodate 172 students, including 4 students in a new addition on the east end of the structure. Randolph Hall will house 198 students, including 4 students in the new addition on the east end of the structure. 18 students will be housed in the connecting link structure between the two main buildings. The completed project will accommodate a total of 388 students, including Resident Advisors. Additionally, there will be four one-bedroom or efficiency apartments provided, two in Mason Hall and two in the connecting link. Two of these apartments will be designated for university faculty and two will be designated for building supervisors (students). The following summarizes the bed count by area and floor: 46
  • 72. Dormitory Bedrooms Faculty & Building Standard Accessible Supervisor Total Doubles Doubles Apartments Beds Beds Beds Units 1st MASON HALL Floor 0 0 0 1 2nd Floor 32 32 0 3rd Floor 34 2 36 1 4th Floor 48 4 52 0 5th Floor 48 4 52 0 TOTAL 162 10 172 2 RANDOLPH 1st HALL Floor 24 0 24 0 2nd Floor 32 0 32 0 3rd Floor 36 2 38 0 4th Floor 48 4 52 0 5th Floor 48 4 52 0 TOTAL 188 10 198 0 CONNECTING 1st LINK Floor 2 0 2 2 2nd Floor 16 0 16 0 3rd Floor 0 0 0 0 TOTAL 18 0 18 2 Building TOTAL 368 20 388 4 PARKING COUNT A total of 26 parking spaces will be provided for Randolph and Mason Halls, as well as Marye House, the adjacent home of the Dean of Student Life, Judicial Affairs and Community Responsibility, and the Office of Residence Life and Housing. Twenty (including 1 handicapped space) will be located in the lot to the south of Randolph and six (including 1 handicapped space) to the northeast of Mason Hall. 47
  • 73. 16 Preliminary LEED Checklist & Compliance Strategy 48
  • 74. 49
  • 75. LEED COMPLIANCE STRATEGY Category 1, Sustainable Sites The project can expect to receive one point for ‘Site Selection’ because the site is an existing development rather than a green-field. The project may receive up to five points for ‘Development Density and Community Connectivity’ because the site is in a densely developed neighborhood that may meet the density criteria. The project should receive six points for ‘Public Transportation Access’ because there are five bus lines with a stop within one quarter of a mile of the main entrance. The project should receive one point for ‘Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms’ as storage for 60 bicycles is being provided. The project should receive three points for ‘Low-Emitting and Fuel Efficient Vehicles’ by providing reserved priority parking for qualifying vehicles. The project should receive two points for ‘Parking Capacity’ by reducing the number of provided parking spaces. The project should receive one point for ‘Maximize Open Space’ because the site provides vegetated open space with an area greater than the footprint of the building. The project should receive one point for ‘Stormwater Design – Quantity Control’ because the design reduces impermeable surfaces and provides onsite retention. The project should receive one point for ‘Stormwater Design – Quality Control’ because the design provides for filtration of stormwater. The project should receive one point for ‘Heat Island Effect – Non-Roof’ because the design maintains mature trees for shading effect on the hardscape. The project should receive one point for ‘Heat Island Effect – Roof’ because the design incorporates high solar reflectance roofing materials. The project is not attempting to receive, or does not qualify for credits for ‘Brownfield Redevelopment’, ‘Protect or Restore Habitat’, or ‘Light Pollution Reduction’. Category 2, Water Efficiency The project should receive four points for ‘Water Efficient Landscaping’ because the project provides no use potable water use for irrigation. The project should receive two points for ‘Water Use Reduction’ because the plumbing fixtures specified will reduce water use by 30% from the baseline standard. The project is not attempting to receive, or does not qualify for credits for ‘Innovative Wastewater Technology’. Category 3, Energy and Atmosphere The project should receive four points for ‘Optimize Energy Performance’ because the design will improve energy performance by 14% over the baseline standard. It is possible that the project could receive additional points in this category for greater gains 50
  • 76. in efficiency, based on energy modeling; however, due to the limitations of the existing systems to remain, such as the steam heating, the 14% increase noted is what can most reasonably be expected based on the current design. The project should receive three points for ‘Measurement and Verification’ as a system to gather the necessary data can be implemented using the institution’s existing infrastructure. The project may receive two points for ‘Enhanced Commissioning’ and two points for ‘Enhanced Refrigerant Management’. The determination as to whether these points will be pursued will be based on budgetary and time constraints and can be made later in the project. The project is not attempting to receive, or does not qualify for credits for ‘On-Site Renewable Energy’ or ‘Green Power’. Category 4, Materials and Resources The project should receive one point for ‘Building Reuse’ because the project will maintain at least 55% of existing structural walls, floors, and roofs. The project should receive six points for ‘Construction Waste Management’ by diverting 75% of construction waste from landfills by salvaging and recycling. The project should receive two points for ‘Recycled Content’ by using materials with recycled content totaling at least 20% of the total value of materials used for the project. The project should receive two points for ‘Recycled Content’ by using materials with recycled content totaling at least 20% of the total value of materials used for the project. The project should receive two points for ‘Regional Materials’ by using materials manufactured or processed within 500 miles of the project site, totaling at least 20% of the total value of materials used for the project. The project should receive one point for ‘Certified Wood’ by using a minimum of 50% of wood products that certified as being produced from FSC certified sources. The project is not attempting to receive, or does not qualify for credits for ‘Building Reuse- Interior Nonstructural Elements’, ‘Materials Re-use’, or ‘Rapidly Renewable Materials’ Category 5, Indoor Environmental Quality The project should receive one point for’ Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring’ because the design provides the required monitoring capability. The project should receive one point for ‘Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan - During Construction’ by requiring this of the Contractor in the project manual. The project should receive one point for ‘Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan - Before Occupancy’ by requiring this of the Contractor in the project manual. The project should receive one point for ‘Low-Emitting Materials - Adhesives and Sealants’ because products meeting the requisite criteria are available, applicable, and can be specified in the design for this project. The project should receive one point for ‘Low-Emitting Materials - Paints and Coatings’ because products meeting the requisite criteria are available, applicable, and can be specified in the design for this project. The project should receive one point for 51
  • 77. ‘Low-Emitting Materials - Flooring Systems’ because products meeting the requisite criteria are available, applicable, and can be specified in the design for this project. The project should receive one point for ‘Low-Emitting Materials - Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products’ because products meeting the requisite criteria are available, applicable, and can be specified in the design for this project. The project should receive one point for ‘Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control’ because the requisite control provisions, are appropriate for, can be incorporated into the design for this project. The project should receive one point for ‘Controllability of Systems - Lighting’ because the requisite control provisions are appropriate and can be incorporated into the design for this project. The project should receive one point for ‘Controllability of Systems - Thermal Comfort’ because the requisite control provisions are appropriate and can be incorporated into the design for this project. The project should receive one point for ‘Thermal Comfort - Verification’ because the requisite control provisions, are appropriate and can be incorporated into the design for this project. The project should receive one point for ‘Daylight and Views – Views’ because 90% of normally occupied spaces within the building will have a direct line of sight to outdoor environments. The project may receive one point for ‘Daylight and Views – Daylight’ depending on the calculations for the amount of daylight available. The project may receive one point for ‘Thermal Comfort – Design’. Computer modeling will be required to determine if the designed HVAC system will be able to meet the strictures of this credit. The project is not attempting to receive, or does not qualify for credits for ‘Increased Ventilation’. Category 6, Innovation in Design The project should receive one point for ‘LEED Accredited Professional’ as several key members of the project team are LEED Accredited Professionals. Category 7, Regional Priority The project is not attempting to receive, or does not qualify for any credits in this category. END OF BASIS OF DESIGN NARRATIVE 52
  • 78. ATTACHMENT 2 Lump Sum General Conditions Items The CM shall include in the general conditions proposal the following minimum requirements. The general conditions to be provided by the CM in the general conditions proposal are considered limited in scope and not inclusive of all general conditions required for the project. Proposed costs provided by the CM shall be used for evaluation purposes with final general conditions to be determined at a later date after negotiations between Owner and selected CM.  Project/Construction management and supervision  Procurement management and administration  Project accounting, budgeting, estimating and forecasting  Scheduling  Safety engineering, training, management and administration  Quality engineering, training, management and administration  Building equipment start up, commissioning and turnover  Office management including clerical and administrative support  Personnel relocation and travel expenses  Mobilization, rental, demobilization of temporary project facilities and offices, including office furnishings  Office equipment and supplies  Office computers, networking, internet and software costs  Telephones, cellular phones, pagers, two-way radios, etc.  Vehicles and their associated maintenance, repair, fuel and insurance costs  Storage facilities (on and/or off site)  Site signage as approved by the Owner  Site access and safety training  Project photographs  Additional items proposed by the CM to ensure a successful project
  • 79. ATTACHMENT 3 COST PROPOSAL FORM CM @ Risk DATE: PROJECT: Renovation: Residence Halls University of Mary Washington Fredericksburg, Virginia Project Code: 215-17507 To: Commonwealth of Virginia University of Mary Washington Fredericksburg, Virginia In compliance with and subject to your Request for Proposal and the documents therein specified, all of which are incorporated herein by reference, the undersigned proposes to furnish all labor, equipment, and materials and perform all work necessary for construction of this project, in accordance with the Request for Proposal dated November 16, 2009, and the Addenda noted below, as prepared by University of Mary Washington, for the consideration of the following amount: PART A. Lump sum price to provide Pre-Construction Services as described in Sections II.B. and III.A. of the Request for Proposal: PART A = ________________________________________ Dollars ($ ___________ ). PART B. Lump sum price for the Construction Manager’s Fee as described in Sections II.C. and III.C. of the Request for Proposal: PART B = ________________________________________ Dollars ($ ___________ ). PART C. Lump sum (fixed) price for General Conditions items as described in Sections II.C. and III.D. and Attachment 2 of the Request for Proposal. In addition to providing the lump sum amount below, the Construction Manager (CM) shall attach to this Cost Proposal form a listing of individual cost items including hourly rates, unit costs, durations, etc.: PART C = ________________________________________ Dollars ($ ____ ______ ). PART D. Lump sum price for the Construction Management Contingency as described in Sections II.C. and III.F. of the Request for Proposal: PART D = ________________________________________ Dollars ($ ______ ___ ).
  • 80. TOTAL AMOUNT (PARTS A + B + C + D): ____________________________________________________DOLLARS ($___________________) Acknowledgment is made of receipt of the following Addenda: ______________________ Either the undersigned or one of the following individuals, if any, is authorized to modify this Cost Proposal prior to the deadline for receipt of proposals by writing the modification and signing his name on the face of the sealed envelope, on the envelope in which it is enclosed, on a separate document, or on a document which is telefaxed to the Owner or by sending the Owner a telegraphic message: _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Proposer ___________________________________________________________ (Name of Firm) By____________________________________________ (Signature) ______________________________________________ (Typed Name) Title ____________________________________________ Business Address: ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Telephone # _________________________ FAX # _____________________________
  • 81. Page 1 of 3 ATTACHMENT 4 CONTRACT BETWEEN OWNER AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGER FOR PRECONSTRUCTION SERVICES This Contract dated this _______ day of ______________, 19___ is between _______________________________________________________________________ ("Owner") and ______________________________________________________________ ("Construction Manger" or "CM"), whose Identification Number (FEIN or SSN) is _______________________, and is binding among and between these parties as of the date of the Owner's signature. RECITALS 1. The legal address for the Owner and for the Construction Manager and the addresses for delivery of Notices and other project documents are as follows: Owner- Attn- Address- City, State, Zip- Telephone ( ) FAX ( ) Construction Manager - Attn- Address- City, State, Zip- Telephone ( ) FAX ( ) 2. The Owner requires pre-construction services for the following work (the "Project"): The general requirements for the services are set forth in RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507, dated November 16, 2009. 3. After competitive procurement pursuant to the Virginia Public Procurement Act, the Owner has selected above-named Construction Manager to perform the duties of Construction Manager for the Project. 4. During competitive negotiations, the Construction Manager agreed to provide the preconstruction services for the Project under the terms and conditions set forth below and in RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507, dated November 16, 2009.
  • 82. Page 2 of 3 THEREFORE, in consideration of the Recitals set forth above, and good and valuable consideration as set forth below, the parties agree as follows: 1. Scope of Services The Construction Manager agrees to provide all labor and resources necessary to perform the services described in RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507,November 16, 2009. The Construction Manager further agrees to provide the additional services included in the negotiations and in conformance with the requirements set forth in RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507, dated November 16, 2009, for such services. 2. Contract Amount The Owner will compensate the Construction Manager for such preconstruction services for the total contract amount of Dollars ($ ) on the terms and conditions set forth herein and in RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507, November 16, 2009, as established and agreed upon during competitive negotiations. If the Contract Amount includes an estimated or budgeted amount for reimbursable expense items, the Contract Amount shall be adjusted upward or downward by Change Order to reflect the actual amounts approved for reimbursement. 3. Payments Payments to the Construction Manager shall conform to the provisions of the General Conditions for Nonprofessional Services, DGS-30-264. The Construction Manager agrees to make payments to its subcontractors and consultants in conformance with the provisions of the General Conditions for Nonprofessional Services, DGS-30-264. Unless otherwise provided under the Contract Documents, interest on payments due the Construction Manager shall accrue at the rate of one percent per month. § 2.2-4354 of the Code of Virginia. 4. Contract Documents The following documents are incorporated by reference into this Contract: a. RFP#: CMRISK-215-17507, dated November 16, 2009. b. General Conditions For Nonprofessional Services, DGS-30-264. c. Special Conditions For Nonprofessional Services, DGS-30-268. 5. Termination The Owner may terminate this contract as set forth in the General Conditions For Nonprofessional Services, DGS-30-264.
  • 83. Page 3 of 3 6. Disputes / Claims Any contractual claims shall be submitted in accordance with the contractual dispute procedures set forth in the General Conditions For Nonprofessional Services, DGS-30-264 and/or any Agency Contractual Disputes Procedure attached to this Contract. In witness whereof the undersigned have executed this contract on the dates set forth beside their respective signatures. ____________________________________ ____________________________________ CONSTRUCTION MANAGER OWNER By:_______________________________ By:_______________________________ (Signature in ink) (Date) (Signature in ink) (Date) Name:_____________________________ Name:_____________________________ Title:______________________________ Title:______________________________ ATTEST:__________________________ ATTEST:___________________________ (Signature) (Date) (Signature) (Date)
  • 84. ATTACHMENT 5 GENERAL TERMS & CONDITIONS FOR PRECONSTRUCTION SERVICES * See Agency Procurement and Surplus Property Manual - Download from: http://dps.dgs.virginia.gov/dps/.
  • 85. ATTACHMENT 6 Contract Between Owner and Contractor DGS-30-064 (3 pages) * Download from DGS Form Center @ http://bcom.dgs.virginia.gov
  • 86. ATTACHMENT 7 General Conditions of the Construction Contract DGS-30-054 * Download from DGS Form Center @ http://bcom.dgs.virginia.gov
  • 87. ATTACHMENT 8 Supplemental General Conditions - SWAM DGS-30-377 (1 page) * Download from DGS Form Center @ http://bcom.dgs.virginia.gov
  • 88. ATTACHMENT 9 Project Cost Elements I. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SERVICES DESCRIPTION PRECON. FEE BASIC FEE GEN. CONDS A/E COST OWNER COST DIRECT COST Project Superintendent(s) X Assistant Superintendent's) X Field Engineer X Corporate Executives X Principal in Charge X Project Executive X Legal (Basic Services) X Project Manager X Accounting X Scheduling X Life-Cycle X Energy Management X Production Engineering X Purchasing X Value Engineering X Systems Development X Estimating X Cost Engineers X Project Coordinator X Project Expeditor X Drafting Detailer X Drawing Checker X Safety Officer X E.E.O. Officer X Secretarial X Quality Control/Manager X Clerk-Typist X Mechanical Coordinator X Electrical Coordinator X Project Engineer X Scheduling Engineer X Time Keeper/Checker X Safety Engineer X Superintendents Transportation X Off-Site Staff Travel Costs X Off-Site Staff Transportation X On-Site Project Manager Trans. X Engineers Transportation X Project Staff Moving Expense X Project Staff Subsistence Costs X Project Budget Estimating X X Project Phasing X X NOTE: ALL PERSONNEL COSTS SHALL INCLUDE SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS.
  • 89. II. SAFETY, SECURITY, AND SERVICES OWNER DESCRIPTION BASIC FEE GEN. CONDS. A/E COST COST DIRECT COST Safety Equipment X First Aid Supplies X Handrails & Toe Boards X Opening Protection X Fire Extinguishers/Fire Watch X Security Guard/Watchman Svcs. X Weekly Cleanup X Final Cleanup X Temporary Fencing X Covered Walkways X Barricades X Safety Nets X Ambulance Costs X Debris Hauling/Removal X Traffic Control X 2-Way Radio Equipment X Trash Chute & Hoppers X Snow & Ice Removal X NOTE: ALL PERSONNEL COSTS SHALL INCLUDE SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS
  • 90. III. FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND SERVICES OWNER DESCRIPTION BASIC FEE GEN. CONDS. A/E COST COST DIRECT COST CM Office Trailer Rental X Owner Office Trailer Rental X Tool/Utility Trailer Rental X Water/Ice X Temp. Lighting/Wiring X Power Expenses X Temp. Water Services X Temp. Heat Expenses X Temp. Toilets/Sewer Services X Change/Shower Rooms X Lunch Rooms X Temporary Stairs X Temp. Enclosures/Partitions X Protect Signs/Bulletin Boards X Telephone Expenses X Temporary Roads X Trucks X Air Compressors X Dewatering Equipment X Generators X Miscellaneous Equipment X Fuel Repairs/Maintenance X Note: ALL PERSONNEL COSTS SHALL INCLUDE SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS * Site office telephone expenses only, home office is part of fee.
  • 91. IV. VERTICAL HOISTING OWNER DESCRIPTION BASIC FEE GEN CONDS A/ECOST COST DIRECT COST Hoist & Tower Rental X Small Material Hoist Rental X Hoist L&ings & Fronts X Hoist Operators X Hoist Safety Inspections X Hoist Material Skips X Hoist Material Hoppers X Erect & Dismantle Hoists X Fuel/Repairs/Maintenance X Hoist Communication X Crane Rental X Crane Operators X Crane Safety Inspections X Erect & Dismantle Crane X Fuel/Repairs/Maintenance X Crane Raising/Jumping Costs X Temporary Elevator Rental X Elevator Operation Cost X Elevator Repairs & Maintenance X Cage Rider @ Elevator X Safety Inspections X Forklift Rental X Forklift Operators X Forklift Safety Inspections X Fuel/Repairs/Maintenance X Elevator Service Costs X NOTE: ALL PERSONNEL COSTS SHALL INCLUDE SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS
  • 92. V. REPRODUCTION AND PRINTING DESCRIPTION PRECON. FEE BASIC FEE GEN. CONDS A/E COST OWNER COST Design Phase Cost Study Documents X Systems Study Documents X Bid Package Documents X Bidding Instructions X Construction Documents X Postage & Express Costs X As-Built Documents (drafting) X As-Built Documents (printing) X Construction Phase Accounting Forms X Field Reporting Forms X Contract Agreements X Schedule Report Forms X Estimating Forms X Cost Reporting Forms X Presentation Charts & Graphics X Value Analysis Studies X Data Processing (In-House) X Reference Materials X Duplication Expense (misc.) X Shop Drawing Printing X Maintenance Manuals X Operation Manuals X Special Forms X Postage & Delivery Expense X Note: ALL PERSONNEL COSTS SHALL INCLUDE SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS
  • 93. VI. PERMITS AND SPECIAL FEES OWNER DESCRIPTION BASIC FEE GEN. CONDS A/ECOST COST DIRECT COST Storage Yard Rental X Parking Lot Rentals X Parking Fees X Curb & Gutter Permits X Sign Permits X Staking & Layout Fees/Costs X Sidewalk Permits X Landscape Permits X Street/Curb Design Charge X Building Permits X Plan Check Fees X Water Connection Fee* X Sanitary Connection Fee* X Storm Connection Fee* X Gas Service Charge* X Power Service Charge* X Steam Service Charge* X Chiller Water Service Charge* X Special Tap Fees X Contractors Licenses X Royalties X Zoning Fees / Consultants X Use Fees X Construction Equip. Licenses X Construction Equip. Permits X A.G.C. Fees X NOTE: ALL PERSONNEL COSTS SHALL INCLUDE SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS * Represent final connection costs, not temporary
  • 94. VII. INSURANCE AND BONDS OWNER DESCRIPTION BASIC FEE GEN. CONDS. A/ECOST COST DIRECT COST Builders Risk Insurance X Errors & Omissions X General Liability X Completed Operations Liability X Excess Liability Coverage X Workman's Compensation* X FICA Insurance* X Federal Unemployment* X State Unemployment* X Payment Bond X Performance Bond X Off-Site Insurance X Off-Site Staff Taxes X NOTE: ALL PERSONNEL COSTS SHALL INCLUDE SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS On-site staff only VIII. OTHER COSTS OWNER DESCRIPTION BASIC FEE GEN. CONDS. A/ECOST COST DIRECT COST Project Taxes X Construction Equipment X Construction Labor Costs X Construction Materials X Cost of Design & Engineering X A/E Cost for Bid Packages X Preliminary Soils Investigations X Title/Development Cost X Land Costs X Financing/Interest Cost X Interim Financing Costs X Owner Change Contingency X Building Operation After Move-in X Building Maint. After Move-in X Moving Coordination X Moving Costs X Corrective Work Extra X Costs of Emergency Work X CM General Overhead Cost X CM Profit/Margin X Costs Over GMP X NOTE: ALL PERSONNEL COSTS SHALL INCLUDE SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS
  • 95. ATTACHMENT 10 Definitions for Small, Women and Minority-Owned (SWAM) Business Small Business Enterprise: "Small business enterprise" shall mean an independently owned and operated business which, together with affiliates, has 250 or fewer employees, or average annual gross receipts of $10 million or less averaged over the previous three years. Nothing in this provision prevents a program, agency, institution or subdivision from complying with the qualification criteria of a specific state program or a federal guideline to be in compliance with a federal grant or program. Minority-Owned Business Enterprise: A business concern with at least 51 percent owned by one or more minorities or in the case of a corporation, partnership or limited liability company or other entity, at least 51 percent of the equity ownership interest in which is owned by one or more minorities and whose management and daily business operations are controlled by one or more of such individuals. Woman-Owned Business Enterprise: A business concern which is at least 51 percent owned by one or more women who are U.S. citizens or legal resident aliens, or in the case of a corporation, partnership or limited liability company or other entity, at least 51 percent of the equity ownership interest in which is owned by one or more women, and whose management and daily business operations are controlled by one or more of such individuals.
  • 96. ATTACHMENT 11 See attached PDF file for all Schematic Drawings