Request for Proposals
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
656
On Slideshare
656
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program A DESIGNATION AND GRANTS INITIATIVE PHASE IV REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS DESIGNATION APPLICATION DEADLINE: JANUARY 16, 20091 RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 15, 2008 AN INITIATIVE OF: 1 All Applicants who complete the designation application by January 16, which includes the Preliminary Grant Application, will receive feedback and be invited to submit a complete grant proposal by February 20, 2009. -1-
  • 2. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program TABLE OF CONTENTS I. OVERVIEW OF THE FIT COMMUNITY INITIATIVE A. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B. A Designation and Grants Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 C. Fit Community Timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 II. KEY CRITERIA FOR DESIGNATION AND GRANT APPLICATIONS A. Behavioral Criteria ...............................................6 B. Place-based Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 C. Community Action Criteria: The 5P Strategy Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 D. Tailoring the 5Ps to your Unique Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 III. FIT COMMUNITY DESIGNATION AWARDS A. Program Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 B. Eligible Applicants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 C. How to Apply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 D. Selection Process ................................................ 10 IV. FIT COMMUNITY GRANT FUNDING A. Program Details .................................................. 10 B. Eligible Applicants ................................................ 11 C. How to Apply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 D. Selection Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 E. Grant Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 F. Use of HWTF Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 V. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE A. About Active Living by Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 B. Technical Assistance Provided by ALbD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 C. Applicant Information Sessions: Conference Call and Workshops . . . . . . . . . . 14 D. Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 -2-
  • 3. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program I. OVERVIEW OF THE FIT COMMUNITY INITIATIVE The NC Health and Wellness Trust Fund (HWTF) is pleased to release the Request for Proposals (RFP) for Phase IV of the Fit Community designation and grants program. The RFP provides detailed information about all aspects of the Fit Community Initiative, including the criteria that will be used to award designations and grants as well as a description of technical assistance available for all applicants and grantees. This program was made possible in part by contributions from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina. A. Background Physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use contribute to the risk for obesity and a host of chronic diseases, and account in part for two-thirds of all preventable deaths in our state. Ninety percent of North Carolinians demonstrate one or more of these behavioral risk factors,2 and North Carolina’s obesity rates continue to increase. In 2007, a reported 64.6% were overweight or obese, an increase of 9% since 2000.3 Among children ages 6-19, a reported 45% were either overweight or obese4. Moreover, the costs of avoidable medical expenses, workers compensation, and lost productivity in North Carolina for obesity alone were estimated at $57.4 billion in 2006, and could reach $75 billion by 2011 (by contrast, the 2008 annual state budget for North Carolina is over $20 billion).5 A growing body of evidence shows that the obesity epidemic will not be solved by programs and activities focused solely on individual behavior change. Communities must respond by implementing the types of policies and environments that make healthy choices easier and more accessible for all citizens. For instance, a majority of North Carolinians, particularly minorities, believe their physical activity would increase with more accessible sidewalks and trails for walking and bicycling.6 Such indicators highlight how the places where people live, work, and play can greatly affect their health behavior choices. The Fit Community initiative aims to help communities address these complex issues in a collaborative and comprehensive manner. B. A Designation and Grants Program The Fit Community initiative is a designation and grants program that promotes a more holistic, community-based approach to address obesity in North Carolina. Fit Community designations are awarded at four levels—Platinum, Gold, Silver, and Bronze—and are valid for three years (2009-2012). Fit Community grants will be awarded for two years for up to $60,000. More details are provided in Sections III and IV. Fit Community designation awards recognize North Carolina municipalities and counties that currently excel in supporting physical activity, healthy eating, and tobacco use prevention in the community, schools, and workplaces. The application for a Fit Community designation award is available online at www.fitcommunitync.com. The Fit Community designation program is similar in intent to the All America City program supported by the National Civic League, the Well City USA program designed by the Wellness Councils of America, the Bicycle Friendly Community Campaign supported by the League of American Bicyclists, and the 2 North Carolina Prevention Partners’ 2008 Prevention Report Card. 3 2007 NC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 4 2005 NC Youth Risk Behavior Survey 5 ”Tipping the Scales,” a 2008 study commissioned by Be Active NC 6 Overall, 60% of NC BRFSS (2007) respondents responded “Yes” when asked if they believed they would increase their physical activity if their community had more accessible sidewalks and trails for walking and bicycling. For minority respondents, the percentage was even higher (72% among African Americans, 73% among Native Americans, 81% among Asians, and 84% among Hispanics). -3-
  • 4. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program Promoting Active Communities award program in Michigan. These and other similar designation programs can have a positive impact on civic excellence by encouraging community leaders, government officials, businesses and non-profit organizations to work together to address critical health, livability and sustainability issues. By providing a grant funding component, the Fit Community program aims to increase the number of communities who are able to attain this honorable distinction. Fit Community grants fund and provide technical assistance to communities with projects that seek to impact physical activity and/or healthy eating with a primary focus on policy and environmental change. The HWTF will award grants up to $60,000 for a two-year period. Selection criteria include demonstrated need, proven capacity to undertake the proposed work, and an emphasis on implementing policy and environmental change strategies. To be eligible for a grant, each applicant must submit their Fit Community designation application, including a Preliminary Grant Application, on or before the primary application deadline of January 16, 2009. All applicants who complete this step will be invited to apply for Fit Community grant funding. The complete grant application will be emailed to applicants upon receipt of the designation application, and will be due on February 20, 2009. Communities are not required to earn a designation in order to receive a grant, but the designation Self-Assessment process is expected to inform grant proposals. Also, receipt of a Fit Community designation does not guarantee receipt of a grant. The review processes are separate, and the outcome of one does not depend on the outcome of the other. Active Living by Design (ALbD), the technical assistance provider for the Fit Community initiative, strongly encourages applicants to contact us early in the application process in order to gain assistance in developing project proposals. One conference call will also be offered, with registration instructions provided in Part V of this RFP. In addition, ALbD will schedule one- on-one “coaching calls” with each applicant after receipt of each designation application and Preliminary Grant Application. This customized technical assistance and feedback is intended to help applicants craft competitive proposals based on Fit Community initiative objectives of affecting policy and environmental change. It does not guarantee a grant funding award, however. -4-
  • 5. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program C. Fit Community Timeline Data Action Required Resources • RFP Request for Proposals (RFP) released for • Designation Application October 15, 2008 Phase IV designation and grant awards • Fit Community Endorsement Form • Frequently Asked Questions November 18, Information conference call (recorded) for Refer to RFP Section V, Part C for 2008, 2:00 – 3:30 grant applicants (Registration is required; instructions pm see Section V. C.) Application Deadline: Designations Refer to Fit Community Designation and Preliminary Grant Applications Application Checklist, page 50 on (emailed attachments only to Designation application January 16, fcinfo@activelivingbydesign.org); 2009, 5:00 pm Applicants who submit on or before this deadline are automatically invited to submit a complete grant application One-on-one “coaching calls” provided to January 21 – each grant applicant to help prepare February 13, competitive final proposal. Coaching calls 2009 do not guarantee a grant award Complete grant application unavailable until January 16, 2009. Will be emailed to proposed Project Director upon receipt of Designation Application. Application Deadline: Full grant application (emailed to • Fit Community Grants: Tools, fcinfo@activelivingbydesign.org and one Resources and References February 20, postmarked package); only those who • HWTF Budget Template 2009, 5:00 pm submit designation application by the • HWTF Budget Justification Form January 16 deadline are able to submit a full grant application • Agreement and Certification For non-profits: • No Conflict of Interest • Certification of No Overdue Taxes March 16 – 27, Finalists for grants will be notified and 2nd 2009 round of “coaching calls” will take place April 10, 2009 Revised project plans due from finalists Reverse site visits in Chapel Hill for April 14 – 16, grantee finalists (required for proposed 2009 Project Directors and up to 4 additional partners) Fit Community designation and grant Late May, 2009 awards announced May – June 13, Grantee action plans finalized and 2009 approved May – June 30, Contracts between HWTF and grantees 2009 finalized July 1, 2009 Official start date of Phase IV grants -5-
  • 6. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program II. KEY CRITERIA FOR DESIGNATION AND GRANT APPLICATIONS The Fit Community initiative uses a comprehensive set of criteria to award designations and grants. In order to submit an application for either award, it is crucial to understand these criteria (see Subsections A. – C., below). During the application process, applicants should collaborate with a group of partners with diverse experience and expertise. Representative(s) from the lead agency and partnering organizations are strongly encouraged to read this section carefully before completing either application. A. Behavioral Criteria Fit Community designations and grants focus mainly on addressing physical activity and healthy eating behaviors. The designation application also addresses tobacco use prevention. Both applications focus on approaches that make these behaviors easy and accessible on a routine basis for community members. The review process for both designations and grants strongly emphasizes Policy and Physical Project strategies that enable these behaviors (see Section II. C.). B. Place-based Criteria The Fit Community initiative focuses on three specific settings: community, schools, and workplaces. The designation application assesses each of these settings in detail. In contrast, grant applications are encouraged to define the target setting(s) as narrowly and strategically as possible (e.g., in a neighborhood, school(s), or workplace(s), as opposed to an entire county or municipality). C. Community Action Criteria: The 5P Strategy Approach The Fit Community initiative uses Active Living by Design’s Community Action, or “5P,” Model, as a framework for community change. The 5P strategies (Policy and Physical Project change, supported by Preparation, Promotion and Programs) offer a comprehensive approach to increasing routine physical activity and healthy eating within community settings. The 5P Model is explained in detail below. Additional information and case studies of the 5P strategies can be found at: www.ActiveLivingbyDesign.org/index.php?id=293. Core Focus: Policy and Physical Projects The 5P Model emphasizes Policy and Physical Project strategies as the most impactful and sustainable means to bring about future behavior change in a community. Policy and Physical Projects are therefore weighted more heavily in the review process for both designations and grants. 1. Policy strategies influence public decisions, such as the creation or change of regulations, guidelines, or local policies that promote routine physical activity and/or healthy eating. Policy work may also include smaller changes in standard practice of organizations, agencies and professionals that result in increased routine physical activity and healthy eating. Several examples include “complete streets” policy that requires amenities for pedestrians and bikers with all new and redeveloped roads; policies to secure greenway networks or designated bicycling routes that make active transportation more feasible; policies to support farmers’ markets and healthy choices in restaurants; mixed-use zoning ordinance that puts more daily trips within walking/bicycling distance; school siting policy that puts more children within walking and biking distance of new educational facilities; school policies that require more daily physical activity and healthy food options for all children; and worksite or church policies that put routine physical activity and/or healthy eating within reach of employees or church patrons. Specific types of policy change may differ in urban versus rural areas, but policy -6-
  • 7. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program options to increase access to routine physical activity and healthy eating are available for every type of community. Educating policy makers, citizens, professionals and advocates is an essential component of this strategy. 2. Physical Projects strategies involve changes that make the physical environment more conducive to routine physical activity and/or healthy eating. Often, sustainable physical project change is the result of policy change and advocacy work that takes place in advance. Specific tactics might include the (partial) construction of walking trails, parks, or greenways; working with officials to implement traffic-calming measures such as crosswalks, roundabouts, tree- lined streets, road diets; and improving access to healthy eating destinations such as grocery stores, farmers’ markets, or community gardens. Physical environments that are altered or built with Fit Community grant funding should be accessible and free to the public. Because the costs for such capital projects can be very high, applicants are encouraged to leverage other funds in addition to Fit Community funds. Applicants are strongly discouraged from proposing the use of an entire Fit Community grant towards the construction of a single physical project. Supporting Strategies: Preparation, Promotions and Programs In creating community supports for routine physical activity and/or healthy eating, communities should consider how Preparation, Promotion, and Programs strategies can work to further their core objectives for Policy and Physical Project change. 3. Preparation strategies involve setting the groundwork for successful community-wide action related to physical activity and/or healthy eating. It is an especially critical element in successful Policy and Physical Project change, and the need for Preparation strategies may vary depending upon the level of community readiness to engage in such work. It is important to create a multidisciplinary partnership (if one does not already exist) with representatives from local organizations and the target population who can help identify and address current barriers to, as well as new opportunities for, increasing routine physical activity and/or healthy eating. At a minimum, the partnership should include one health- related partner (e.g., health department staff, hospital health care provider, community health advocate, etc.), representatives from at least two other relevant disciplines, and at least one member of the target population(s). Other potential partners include school officials, leaders from local non-profit organizations, and/or representatives from the business community, government departments (such as planning, parks and recreation, transportation, public safety), the faith community, and other relevant fields. In addition to simply having a partnership in place, critical Preparation strategies include: • Partnership development to build capacity and effectiveness in achieving goals • Assessment of target audience to better understand assets, needs, and barriers that may influence behavior • Assessment of policy / physical project assets and/or barriers • Community engagement to increase direct involvement of target audience • Generating additional resources (outside funding and in-kind support) to advance project goals • Planning documents (e.g., master pedestrian or bike plan, parks and recreation plan, etc) that will lead to change in future policy(s) and the built environment that enable healthier behaviors. (Note: Fit Community grants must focus on implementation of policy and physical projects, and cannot be spent entirely on the creation of a planning document. If needed, however, some funds may be spent towards a planning document if a clear implementation plan is also in place). -7-
  • 8. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program 4. Promotion strategies help to advance Policy and Physical Project in several ways: they can increase understanding of the benefits of routine physical activity and/or healthy eating, highlight policy recommendations, publicize existing local opportunities, and advocate the need for additional community supports. Specific tactics could include: conducting a social marketing campaign, advertising, gaining support and awareness from policy makers, planning special events or advocacy meetings, mailings, or working with the media to secure ongoing coverage of physical activity and/or healthy eating issues. 5. Programs strategies are designed to provide ongoing, structured opportunities for physical activity and/or healthy eating. Unlike one-time events, programs are organized over distinct periods of time. They should complement policy and the physical environment changes, and can do so by building grassroots support for the need for comprehensive Policy and Physical Project changes. Specific tactics may include developing a walking club to utilize new walking routes or even providing opportunities for club members to advocate for new walking routes, working with existing Safe Routes to School efforts, or organizing classes, clubs or support groups designed to encourage lifelong physical activity and/or healthy eating. D. Tailoring the 5Ps to Your Unique Community Effective integration of the P strategies are often successfully organized around one or more of the following aspects that make it possible to address a community’s unique needs: 1. A specific need or opportunity in the community 2. A single setting (e.g. neighborhood, park, school, or other well defined setting) 3. A specific target population (e.g. by ethnic background, gender, age group, or other well-defined population) In addition, technical assistance to help grantee applicants create strong proposals will be provided in a variety of ways and will be available throughout the entire application period. Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact staff early in the application process for assistance (see Section V. C.). III. FIT COMMUNITY DESIGNATION AWARDS A. Program Details A Fit Community designation award recognizes municipalities and counties that have excelled in meeting the behavioral, place-based, and community action criteria (outlined in Section II.). Designations are awarded at four levels—Platinum, Gold, Silver, and Bronze—and are valid for three years (2009-2012). Table 1, below, outlines the definitions of each award level. Table 1. Fit Community Designation Award Levels Award Award Definition Platinum A model community with tremendous support and opportunities across all key environments to enable healthy lifestyles among residents. Great potential to share lessons and knowledge with other communities. Gold Outstanding achievements in supporting healthy lifestyles across all key environments; potential still exists to bring about more supports. Silver Significant progress in making healthy lifestyles more accessible across the community; gaps in some areas suggest potential for future achievements. Bronze Demonstrated efforts to making healthy lifestyles more accessible in the community; greater gaps suggest ample potential to strengthen local supports. -8-
  • 9. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program Fit Community designation awards are based upon an applicant’s Self-Assessment performance. The assessment tool is based on the 5P strategies described in Section II. C. Specifically, the Self-Assessment uses the 5P strategies to examine current local support for physical activity, healthy eating, and tobacco use prevention initiatives in the community, schools, and workplaces. In addition, the designation application allows communities to self-identify their strengths and weaknesses in order to develop plans for improvement. In order to link designation improvement plans to Fit Community grant funding, communities interested in grant funding must complete Part III of the designation application, the Preliminary Grant Application by January 16, 2009. Benefits of being named a Fit Community Designee include: Top designee recipients earn: • The Platinum award sets a very high standard, and HWTF will coordinate special and highly visible recognition and opportunities for exclusive media coverage for communities able to attain this distinction. • Platinum and Gold designees receive highway signage for the entrance to their community All designee recipients earn: • A Fit Community plaque to be hung in the Mayor’s or County Commissioner’s office • Recognition in statewide media and on the Fit Community Web site • Use of the Fit Community designation logo for use at the recipient’s discretion • Brochures to distribute to community residents and others Past designation applicants report additional positive outcomes: • Improved communication and collaboration among different stakeholders / new partners in the community • New momentum and an advocacy tool within the community for policy and environmental changes that support routine physical activity and healthy eating • Ideas for potential new projects based on the community’s strengths and weaknesses • Supporting data and material for use in other fund raising initiatives B. Eligible Applicants North Carolina incorporated municipalities and counties are eligible for a Fit Community designation. Although the designation award targets these two governmental entities, any non- profit organization may apply as the lead agency on behalf of a municipal or county partnership. Please note the following important information: • A county and a municipality within the same county must apply separately for designation awards. • One designation application is allowed per municipality or county. • Designation responses must be representative of the jurisdiction of the applicant community. In the case that a particular strategy (e.g., programs, policy) spans more than one jurisdiction (e.g., school districts), it is acceptable for both the municipality and county to “check” the strategy in the Self-Assessment. -9-
  • 10. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program • Municipality applications must be endorsed by the Mayor; county applications must be endorsed by the County Commission Chair using the Fit Community Endorsement Form. • If the applicant is also interested in applying for a Fit Community grant, they must complete Part III of the designation application, the Preliminary Grant Application by January 16, 2009. • If the applicant is also interested in applying for a Fit Community grant, the lead agency must be the same, and must fall under one of the eligibility categories (see Section IV. B.). • Applicants are not required to receive a designation in order to qualify for grant funding. The review processes are separate, and the outcome of one does not depend on the outcome of the other. C. How to Apply 1. Download and read all designation application documents on the Fit Community Web site: www.fitcommunitync.com. 2. Understand the 5P strategies (see Section II. C.). 3. Assemble a diverse team of community leaders and work together to complete the designation application (refer to the Resource list at the end of the designation application). 4. Obtain official endorsement from Mayor or County Commission Chair (must use Fit Community Endorsement Form). 5. Complete Preliminary Grant Application if also interested in applying for grant funding. 6. Review and follow full instructions provided on Fit Community designation application Checklist. 7. Email completed designation application to fcinfo@activelivingbydesign.org by 5:00 pm on January 16, 2009. D. Selection Process Designation applications will be screened to ensure the municipality or county currently meets a standard established in the Fit Community Designation Self-Assessment and that submitted data is valid. In order to achieve a designation, communities must reach a percentage threshold established for each award level. Since some of the strategies are weighted more heavily than others, the number of ‘points’ available does not correspond directly to the number of options in the Self-Assessment. Instead, scoring takes into account weighted criteria in addition to assigning proper credit for the range of options available to communities of different types and characteristics. Many different types of communities – urban and rural; municipalities and counties – have achieved a designation in the past. The criteria are designed to be flexible enough to take into account the range of strategies that diverse types of communities can employ to make healthy living more accessible to residents. IV. FIT COMMUNITY GRANT FUNDING A. Program Details The Fit Community grants program will provide funding and technical assistance to North Carolina communities for innovative strategies that increase routine physical activity and/or healthy eating among a defined target setting(s) and target population(s). Note that grant applicants are encouraged to describe complimentary healthy eating and active living 5P strategies in their proposals. However, the choice to focus on just one behavior will not be penalized. Additional criteria include demonstrated need, proven capacity, and promising opportunity for positive change in addressing physical activity and/or healthy eating. HWTF is -10-
  • 11. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program committed to selecting a portfolio of grantee communities that represent a broad geographic range, diversity of needs, and range of strategies used to address those needs. Grants will provide up to $60,000 over two years. Proposals should focus on achieving/implementing Policy and Physical Project strategies as a means to bring about future behavior change. Grantees are encouraged to use Preparation strategies (e.g., partnership building, assessment, community engagement, and leveraging additional resources) in order to achieve and sustain project goals. The extent of Preparation strategies will likely vary depending on applicants’ readiness to engage in Policy and Physical Project change. Additionally, grantees may also propose Promotion and Program strategies to the extent that they support the overall project goals of Policy and Physical Project change. In-kind funding for these strategies is encouraged. Only those applicants who meet the primary application deadline for the Fit Community Designation application, including the Preliminary Grant Application, are invited to submit a complete grant application. The Designation and Preliminary Grant Application is due no later than 5:00 pm, January 16, 2009. The latter is part of the Fit Community designation application and does not need to be attached separately. Applicants will then receive feedback from ALbD on their preliminary applications. The complete grant proposal will be due no later than 5:00 pm, February 20, 2009. Applicants are allowed to submit designation applications before the deadline. B. Eligible Applicants North Carolina municipalities, counties, and lead agencies that represent municipal or county partnerships, and meet HWTF funding eligibility criteria, may apply for Fit Community grant funding. Under the NC General Statutes, the following organizations are eligible to serve as a lead agency and receive a grant from HWTF: • A state agency • A local government or other political subdivision of the state or a combination of such entities • A 501(c)(3) non-profit organization which has as a significant purpose promoting the public’s health, limiting youth access to tobacco products, or reducing the health consequences of tobacco use Other entities interested in being involved in this initiative may apply as part of a partnership with an organization that is eligible to serve as the lead agency for the grant. The lead agency is responsible for overall grant program management, including the performance of any subcontractor or partner. The lead agency must act as the fiscal agent for the grant. Only one grant application will be allowed per municipality or county. It is acceptable for a county and a municipality within the same county to apply separately for grant funding. C. How to Apply 1. Applicants must first complete the Fit Community designation application, including the Self- Assessment and Preliminary Grant Application sections, by January 16, 2009. This automatically qualifies applicants to submit a complete grant proposal. 2. Download and read all grant application documents on the Fit Community Web site: www.fitcommunitync.com. 3. Understand how to integrate the 5P strategies for grant projects. 4. Convene multidisciplinary partnership to discuss Fit Community designation Self- Assessment and grant project ideas. -11-
  • 12. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program 5. Discuss proposal ideas with ALbD early in the process. 6. Complete the Application for Fit Community Grant Funding (Parts I – VII). 7. Review and follow full instructions provided on Fit Community Grant Application Checklist. 8. Email and mail (postmark) completed grant application to ALbD by 5:00 pm on February 20, 2009. D. Selection Process HWTF and ALbD will work together to select the strongest proposals as finalist candidates. These finalists will be invited to participate in a reverse site visit process in which partnerships will present their proposed projects and answer any questions asked by a review panel. The review panel will evaluate the merit of all finalists and present HWTF with funding recommendations. Final award decisions will be determined by the full HWTF Commission in May, 2009. Successful grant applicants will demonstrate the following attributes: • Clearly stated need/rationale for target setting(s) and target population(s), based on local data and needs assessments • Policy and Physical Project strategies are the primary focus, and are directly complimented by Preparation, Promotion, and/or Program strategies where appropriate, with the goal of increasing routine physical activity and/or healthy eating • Map of proposed Physical Project(s) (and, if possible, other strategies) within target setting(s) • Interdisciplinary partnership with strong project leadership, commitment from diverse stakeholders, and clear understanding of organizational roles, responsibilities and contributions • Strong organizational capacity among partners in project planning, implementation, and evaluation • Community engagement, especially among those in target population(s) • Ability to generate or leverage resources and capacity to sustain the initiative after grant period ends • Ability to lead by example and serve as model for other North Carolina communities • Openness to receiving feedback and ongoing technical assistance • Willingness to enter into a partnership with ALbD as a technical assistance provider (see Section V.) The reverse site visit process will work as follows: • During the week of March 16 – 27, 2009, finalists will be notified and participate in coaching calls with an ALbD staff member. During the calls, finalists will receive specific feedback and recommendations to help prepare for the reverse site visits. • Finalists will have until April 10, 2009, to make revisions to their project plans and prepare their reverse site visit presentations. During that time, ALbD will provide additional technical assistance upon request via phone and/or email. • Reverse site visits will be held from April 14 – 16, 2009, in Chapel Hill. If invited, participation in a reverse site visit is required. Each finalist applicant may bring up to five partners (including the Project Director). • All finalists will be reimbursed for round trip mileage to attend the reverse site visits. Some partnerships will be reimbursed for additional expenses, depending upon factors such as travel distance and timing of the visit. (More detailed information is provided in the Reverse Site Visit Preference Form in grant application.) -12-
  • 13. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program E. Grant Terms Each recipient must enter into an initial twelve-month grant contract with HWTF (from July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010), to be renewed for a second grant year, subject to continued availability of funds and satisfactory grantee performance. HWTF expects to receive more requests than can be funded. Therefore, submission of a grant application does not guarantee receipt of an award. Furthermore, grants that are awarded may not be funded at the requested amount. Final awards will be commensurate with the size and scope of the proposed activities. Grantees will select one of the following methods for receipt of the grant funds: 1. An initial payment of 25% of the first-term approved budget—the remaining balance of the total annual award amount may be disbursed equal to the amount submitted on the approved monthly expense reports. (Any portion of the 25% initial payment that is not immediately spent must be placed in a segregated, interest-bearing account that is fully insured for the maximum amount of money that will be placed in the account) 2. Reimbursements based on monthly expense reports (no initial payment) Grantees will be required to submit monthly grant expenditure reports to HWTF. In addition, all grantees will be required to provide quarterly progress reports in a format provided by ALbD. ALbD will review all progress reports in order to monitor project developments and will provide any follow-up recommendations to the grantees and HWTF. A final cumulative progress report and comprehensive financial report will be due 60 days after the end of the grant period (August 29, 2010). All grantees are required to comply with auditing and financial reporting requirements according to North Carolina General Statutes 143C-6-23. Detailed information about these requirements can be found on the NC State Auditor’s Web site: www.NCAuditor.net. F. Use of HWTF Grants Grant funds must be used exclusively to support the approved project and spent in accordance with the grant contract and approved project budget. These expenses must be appropriately budgeted to the categories and line items identified in the Budget and Financial Requirements section of the application for HWTF grant funds. The following uses of grant funds are acceptable: • Staff salaries • Project-related travel • Supplies • Limited amounts of equipment • Other direct expenses essential to the project These are state funds; therefore the following uses of grant funds are NOT acceptable: • Research studies, unless it is directly linked to evaluation purposes • Efforts to engage in political activities or lobbying including, but not limited to, support of or opposition to candidates, specific legislation, ballot initiatives, referenda, or other similar activities (Note, however, that advocacy work and education on particular policy issues are allowed and encouraged when appropriate to the project) • Support for general administration, e.g. computers and laptops, fax machines, rent, furniture, cell phones, PDAs, etc. -13-
  • 14. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program V. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE A. About Active Living by Design Active Living by Design (ALbD) was established in 2001 based on emerging evidence that supports a comprehensive, community-based approach as the best way to increase routine physical activity and healthy eating in communities. Using the comprehensive 5P model as a foundation for their work, ALbD’s diverse team works directly with communities across North Carolina and the nation. They provide technical assistance on the development of locally effective strategies to increase routine physical activity and healthy eating through community design. ALbD is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and is administered by the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health’s NC Institute of Public Health in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. More information is available at www.ActiveLivingbyDesign.org. B. Technical Assistance Provided by ALbD Technical assistance is a collaborative process through which communities and ALbD staff members communicate and share information to achieve the best possible project development, implementation, and outcomes. Technical assistance begins during the application process, and will be provided to applicants, grantee finalists, and grantees. Applicants: ALbD will work with Fit Community designation and grantee applicants to help them understand the application process. ALbD is committed to helping each applicant translate their ideas into a competitive project proposal. Technical assistance is available during the entire application period, October 15 through February 20. One-on-one feedback will be provided to each grant applicant following the receipt of the Preliminary Grant Application. To request additional technical assistance before the preliminary grant proposal, email or call ALbD (see Section V. C.). Grantee finalists: ALbD will work with Fit Community grantee finalists to provide customized feedback from the preliminary review process. Together, finalists and ALbD staff will use the feedback to generate ideas that may strengthen proposals. Finalists will then have the opportunity to modify and improve their proposed projects before the reverse site visit presentation, and may contact ALbD at any time during this period to receive additional assistance. Grantees: ALbD will work with Fit Community grantees on an ongoing basis throughout the grant period as they implement their projects. Scheduled monthly communication with Project Directors and/or Project Coordinators will occur by telephone, and up to two annual site visits will be conducted. Grantees may also contact ALbD at any time via phone or email to request additional assistance. ALbD strives to understand the unique dynamics in each community so that staff can provide effective support and assistance in the following ways: • Share lessons learned and best practices, and help communities devise practical ways to implement such practices • Connect grantee communities with resources and experts they may not previously know of or how to access • Assist grantees in implementing well-integrated 5P projects to affect community change • Assist grantees in navigating administrative requirements • Provide “real time” assistance as needed and when unexpected obstacles arise C. Applicant Conference Call -14-
  • 15. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program An informational conference call will be held for prospective applicants. The purpose of the call is to provide applicants with information about the Fit Community designation and grants program and application process. The information sessions will include brief overviews from representatives from HWTF and ALbD, followed by question and answer discussion. Participation in these information sessions is advised, but not required to apply for designation or grant funding. The conference call will be held on November 18, 2008, 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm. Applicants must register for the conference call no later than 24 hours in advance to receive a dial-in number and password. To register: 1. Send an email to: fcinfo@activelivingbydesign.org 2. In the subject line, write: Register CC 3. In the email, provide the following information: • Name and title • Organization • Address • Phone number • Email address • Specific questions that should be addressed Applicants may also choose to listen to the recorded conference call anytime between November 19, 2009 and February 20, 2009. To receive instructions for listening to the recorded call: 1. Send an email to fcinfo@activelivingbydeisng.org 2. In the subject line, write the following: Register CC – Recording 3. In the email, provide the information required in step 3, above Before participating in a conference call, applicants are required to do the following: • Read the entire RFP, FAQs, designation and grant application documents. All materials can be found on the Fit Community Web site: www.fitcommunitync.com. • Identify questions or issues and send them to ALbD when registering. • Register to participate in the call. Each applicant partnership is limited to one phone line on the conference call. D. Contact Information ALbD Fit Community staff contact information for technical assistance: Jen Walker, Fit Community Project Manager: 919-843-3079 Cara Crisler, Active Living by Design Project Officer: 919-843-3298 Email: fcinfo@activelivingbydesign.org -15-
  • 16. RFP for Fit Community – A designation and grants program To submit a Fit Community designation and grant application, refer to and follow the full instructions provided in the application materials, both located at: www.fitcommunitync.com. -16-