Proposals

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  • Proposals

    1. 1. Research Proposals Adapted partly from Proposal and Grantwriting Seminar given by Barbara Breier Exec. Director of Development, UT Austin 2001 Texas Women Faculty Forum http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/fwo/breier/index.htm
    2. 2. Identify potential funding sources.
    3. 3. Funding Sources All Possible Funding Sources Government Sources National Foundations Regional Foundations Corporations Donors
    4. 4. Process of researching potential grants: <ul><li>Cast a wide net and identify all the possible funding sources for your project. Then narrow down to the ones that are your best prospects . </li></ul><ul><li>Use the Development Office and Office of Special Projects to assist you. </li></ul><ul><li>Review professional publications and Chronicle of Higher Education for notice of similar grants. </li></ul><ul><li>Use internet resources. Check out Community of Science . </li></ul>
    5. 5. Cultivate relationship with prospective funding sources. <ul><li>Call funding source and request any updated information. </li></ul><ul><li>Let them know you are interested in submitting a proposal. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to schedule a visit. </li></ul><ul><li>Regularly visit the prospects. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the Development office to identify board contacts. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Preparing The Proposal <ul><li>Understand the larger implications of the project. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the proposal format. </li></ul><ul><li>Be as specific about the project as you can. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the specific outcomes you hope to accomplish. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe how you will evaluate results/outcomes. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Writing the proposal: Just do it ! <ul><li>Do as much homework as possible. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>gather the pieces (info. from others, past results, budget items, milestones) before starting to write. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Outline your solution. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss with colleagues. </li></ul><ul><li>Do the budget first (you’ll probably adjust it). </li></ul><ul><li>Be positive and patient with colleagues. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Follow the format in the Request for Proposals (RFP) <ul><li>Follow requested format EXACTLY. </li></ul><ul><li>Observe page limitations and headings requests. </li></ul><ul><li>Observe font and spacing requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>Put vitas in requested format (request others’ vitas in this format). </li></ul>
    9. 9. Proposal Outline (usual sections and lengths) <ul><li>Cover letter or Executive Summary (1 page) </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction/Statement of Need (2 pages) </li></ul><ul><li>Project Description (4 pages) (Objectives, methods, evaluation, future funding) </li></ul><ul><li>Budget (1 page) </li></ul><ul><li>Appendices: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vitas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>other supplemental material specifically allowed </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Cover Letter or Executive Summary <ul><li>Never more than 2 pages (usually 1 page) </li></ul><ul><li>Makes a compelling case for the merit of the project based on need and opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a brief statement of the institution and how this project relates to strategic plans. </li></ul><ul><li>Explains why the funding is required at this time. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Statement of Need <ul><li>Provide accurate, relevant data that support why this project is important. (Ex: 20% of the incoming freshmen lack the necessary computer skills to perform analytical tasks in Chemistry.) </li></ul><ul><li>Provide positive reasons why support would make a difference. </li></ul><ul><li>If appropriate, describe how project would benefit other departments, universities, special populations or society in general. </li></ul><ul><li>Often part of both Intro. and Summary. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Project Description <ul><li>Identify specific objectives to be accomplished within a specified time frame. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the implementation process or the methodology for the project. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the key personnel for the project and their relative expertise in the discipline </li></ul><ul><li>(put C. V.s in appendix). </li></ul><ul><li>Outline how the project will be evaluated at various points in the implementation schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe how the project will be continued once the grant funds are expended. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Budget and Budget Justification <ul><li>Outline all of the cost categories associated with the project. </li></ul><ul><li>Define the exact cost as available at the time. </li></ul><ul><li>Detail how costs are calculated. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t overestimate or inflate budget. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not include an administrative overhead unless guidelines specify. </li></ul>
    14. 14. In-kind costs : your organization’s contribution to the project <ul><li>Calculations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facility usage by square foot </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personnel costs by hourly or annual salary prorated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Utilities, telephone, maintenance, at an administrative overhead </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communications costs prorated (copying, fax machines, computers) </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Proposal Outline (Valiela) <ul><li>Title page </li></ul><ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Proposed Research </li></ul><ul><li>Literature Cited </li></ul><ul><li>Personnel Data </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule of Work </li></ul><ul><li>Budget and Budget Justification </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional Certificates/Current & Pending Research </li></ul>
    16. 16. My last (successful) proposal to NSF: <ul><li>Cover page </li></ul><ul><li>Summary (1 page) </li></ul><ul><li>Project Description (15 pages) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>including literature cited , description of expertise of participating personnel, and schedule of work </li></ul></ul><ul><li>List of References </li></ul><ul><li>Personnel CVs </li></ul><ul><li>Budget and Budget Justification </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional Certificates, Current & Pending Research, Letters of Support </li></ul>
    17. 17. Follow-up to Proposal <ul><li>Call after a week or so to make sure the proposal arrived. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have not heard anything in 30 days, you may call and ask the status of the proposal. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask if they need additional information for their review. </li></ul><ul><li>Update them on any changes in the project or on funds committed to the project. </li></ul><ul><li>If no response after 2 months, send a follow-up letter. Keep this follow-up going every 30 days until you hear from them or for 6 months. </li></ul>
    18. 18. If You Are Funded <ul><li>Wait for official notification in writing from the president of the board or project director. </li></ul><ul><li>Review letter carefully-- it represents a contract between your organization and the granting foundation/ agency/corporation. </li></ul><ul><li>If there is a major problem with the project or program that is going to cause a significant delay, you must notify the granting agency. </li></ul><ul><li>You want to have a long term relationship with this funding source. </li></ul><ul><li>Periodically call them and let them know the progress. Meet all interim report deadlines. </li></ul>
    19. 19. If You Are Not Funded <ul><li>Write a polite letter saying you regret that they could not support your project and hope to be able to submit another project in the future. </li></ul><ul><li>Call and ask them to give you feedback. </li></ul><ul><li>Express appreciation for their hard work and interest. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage them to visit your organization when they are in town. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell them you will stay in touch -- and do stay in touch. </li></ul>

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