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  • 1. STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER TENNESSEE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR EVALUATION OF TWO K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS RFP # 31701-11070 OCTOBER 8, 2009 RFP CONTENTS SECTIONS: 1. INTRODUCTION 2. RFP SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 3. PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS 4. GENERAL CONTRACTING INFORMATION & REQUIREMENTS 5. PROPOSAL EVALUATION & CONTRACT AWARD ATTACHMENTS: 6.1. Proposal Statement of Certifications & Assurances 6.2. Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide 6.3. Cost Proposal & Scoring Guide 6.4. Reference Questionnaire 6.5. Proposal Score Summary Matrix 6.6. Pro Forma Contract 6.7. Approved Learn and Serve America Program Narratives
  • 2. 1. INTRODUCTION The State of Tennessee, Department of Finance and Administration, Volunteer Tennessee, hereinafter referred to as “the State,” has issued this Request for Proposals (RFP) to define minimum service requirements; solicit proposals; detail proposal requirements; and, outline the State’s process for evaluating proposals and selecting a contractor to provide the needed service. Through this RFP, the State seeks to buy the best services at the most favorable, competitive prices and to give ALL qualified businesses, including those that are owned by minorities, women, persons with a disability, and small business enterprises, opportunity to do business with the state as contractors and sub-contractors. 1.1. Statement of Procurement Purpose The State intends to secure a contract for school and community-based service-learning program evaluation and related training and technical assistance services. Evaluation reports to be developed will document youth participant attitude changes and community partner assessments related to performance goals under two new K-12 Learn and Serve America grants from the federal Corporation for National and Community Service for the 2009-2012 period. Grant applications successfully submitted by the state for these two programs are included as Attachment 6.7 of the RFP. These grant applications are included for background purposes only and may not accurately reflect the current situation. Information contained elsewhere in the RFP is more current and accurate. Service-learning is a teaching methodology that combines academic learning and volunteer community service to meet community needs and improve student academic, behavioral and civic engagement outcomes. Since 1994, the TN Department of Education and Volunteer Tennessee, the state volunteer service commission, have partnered to support a nationally recognized network of programs and professional support for service-learning among Tennessee schools and nonprofits. In 2009-2012, the Department of Education will continue to provide education policy leadership and Volunteer Tennessee will provide operational management of the two K-12 service-learning programs, including coordination of training, technical assistance, evaluation services and subgrant management. While a variety of data will be collected to document program impact under the two new grants, the focus of the evaluation contract will be to support a system of pre- and post-test data collection from K-12 youth participants and control groups, analysis of that data and reader-friendly annual summary reports. From 2000-2009, similar evaluation services using a quasi-experimental design have measured changes and shown growth among at-risk students in life skills, resilience, school performance, career and work motivation, student behavior and civic responsibility for participating elementary, middle and high school students. The data and analysis from both programs will be used for three main purposes:  To meet federal reporting requirements  To help teachers and program administrators improve service delivery  To increase understanding of educators and policy-makers as to the effectiveness of service- learning as a strategy for drop-out prevention and civic engagement Key features of the two programs are shown below. The pre and post test surveys and timing for the two programs (school-based and community-based) will vary based on different program structures and goals. Common data elements are desirable as appropriate. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 1
  • 3. L&S Grant FY10 Program Period Federal $ Subgrantees Participants Program Structure School- July 2009- $319,704 6-10 TN School 3000 public school Classroom-based Based K-12 June 2012 Districts students service-learning tied to academic curricula Community- September $293,498 TN 4-H 5,000 youth Service-learning camps Based K-12 2009-August YMCA participants during school breaks 2011 Bridges/ focused on dropout PeaceJam prevention and peer mentoring Total $613,202 9-13 8,000 youth subgrantees A professional evaluator with understanding of the field of service-learning and ability to generate valid, succinct and reader-friendly reports is required to conduct effective evaluations of these two programs. 1.2. Scope of Service, Contract Period, & Required Terms and Conditions The RFP Attachment 6.6., Pro Forma Contract details the State’s required:  Scope of Services and Deliverables (Section A);  Contract Period (Section B);  Payment Terms (Section C);  Standard Terms and Conditions (Section D); and,  Special Terms and Conditions (Section E). The pro forma contract substantially represents the contract document that the successful Proposer must sign. 1.3. Nondiscrimination No person shall be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination in the performance of a Contract pursuant to this RFP or in the employment practices of the Contractor on the grounds of disability, age, race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or any other classification protected by federal, Tennessee state constitutional, or statutory law. The Contractor pursuant to this RFP shall, upon request, show proof of such nondiscrimination and shall post in conspicuous places, available to all employees and applicants, notices of nondiscrimination. 1.4. RFP Communications 1.4.1. The State has assigned the following RFP identification number that must be referenced in all communications regarding this RFP: RFP # 31701-11070 1.4.2. Unauthorized contact about this RFP with employees or officials of the State of Tennessee except as detailed below may result in disqualification from consideration under this procurement process. 1.4.2.1. Potential proposers must direct communications relating to this RFP to the following person designated as the RFP Coordinator. Dorothy Vaughn Department of Finance and Administration 312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue Suite 1700 Wm Snodgrass TN Tower RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 2
  • 4. Nashville, TN 37243-1102 (615) 741-7361Phone (615) 741-6164 FAX Dorothy.vaughn@tn.gov 1.4.2.2. Notwithstanding the foregoing, potential proposers may contact: a. staff of the Governor’s Office of Diversity Business Enterprise for assistance available to minority-owned, women-owned, and small businesses as well as general, public information relating to this RFP; and b. the following individual designated by the State to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements of the State of Tennessee, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and associated federal regulations: Greg Spradley Senior Management Consultant Tennessee Department of Finance & Administration Office of Consulting Services 312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue, Suite 1200 Nashville, TN 37243 Phone: 615-741-6049 Fax: 615-532-1892 Greg.Spradley@n.gov 1.4.3. Only the State’s official, written responses and communications will be binding with regard to this RFP. The State will consider oral communications of any type to be unofficial and non-binding. 1.4.4. Potential proposers must ensure that the State receives all written comments, including questions and requests for clarification, no later than the Written Comments Deadline detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. 1.4.5. Proposers must assume the risk of the method of dispatching any communication or proposal to the State. The State assumes no responsibility for delays or delivery failures resulting from the method of dispatch. Actual or digital “postmarking” of a communication or proposal to the State by a specified deadline date will not substitute for the State’s actual receipt of a communication or proposal. 1.4.6. The State will convey all official responses and communications related to this RFP to the potential proposers from whom the State has received a Notice of Intent to Propose (refer to RFP Section 1.8). 1.4.7. The State reserves the right to determine, at its sole discretion, the method of conveying official, written responses and communications related to this RFP. Such written communications may be transmitted by mail, hand-delivery, facsimile, electronic mail, Internet posting, or any other means deemed reasonable by the State. 1.4.8. The State reserves the right to determine, at its sole discretion, the appropriate and adequate responses to written comments, questions, and requests related to this RFP. The State’s official, written responses will constitute an amendment of this RFP. 1.4.9. Any data or factual information provided by the State (in this RFP, an RFP amendment or any other communication relating to this RFP) is for informational purposes only. The State will make reasonable efforts to ensure the accuracy of such data or information, however it is within the discretion of Proposers to independently verify any information before relying thereon. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 3
  • 5. 1.5. Assistance to Proposers With a Disability Potential proposers with a disability may receive accommodation relating to the communication of this RFP and participating in the RFP process. Potential proposers may contact the RFP Coordinator to request such reasonable accommodation no later than the Disability Accommodation Request Deadline detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. 1.6. Proposer Required Review & Waiver of Objections 1.6.1. Each potential proposer must carefully review this RFP, including but not limited to, attachments, the RFP Attachment 6.6., Pro Forma Contract, and any amendments, for questions, comments, defects, objections, or any other matter requiring clarification or correction (collectively called “questions and comments”). 1.6.2. Any potential proposer having questions and comments concerning this RFP must provide such in writing to the State no later than the Written Comments Deadline detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. 1.6.3. Protests based on any objection shall be considered waived and invalid if the objection has not been brought to the attention of the State, in writing, by the Written Comments Deadline. 1.7. Pre-Proposal Conference Call A Pre-Proposal Conference Call will be held at the time and date detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. Pre-Proposal Conference Call attendance is not mandatory. The conference call phone number will be: 1-877-209-0036. No password is necessary. The purpose of the conference call is to discuss the RFP scope of services. The State will entertain questions, however potential proposers must understand the State’s response to any question at the Pre- Proposal Conference to be tentative and non-binding. Potential proposers should submit questions concerning the RFP in writing and must submit them prior to the Written Comments Deadline date detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. The State will send the official response to questions to potential proposers as indicated in RFP Section 1.8 and on the date detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. 1.8. Notice of Intent to Propose Before the Notice of Intent to Propose Deadline detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events, potential proposers should submit to the RFP Coordinator a Notice of Intent to Propose (in the form of a simple e-mail or other written communication). Such notice should include the following information:  the business or individual’s name (as appropriate)  a contact person’s name and title  the contact person’s mailing address, telephone number, facsimile number, and e-mail address A Notice of Intent to Propose creates no obligation and is not a prerequisite for making a proposal, however, it is necessary to ensure receipt of any RFP amendments or other notices and communications relating to this RFP. 1.9. Proposal Deadline A Proposer must ensure that the State receives a proposal no later than the Proposal Deadline time and date detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. A proposal must respond, as required, to this RFP (including its attachments) as may be amended. The State will not accept late proposals, and a Proposer’s failure to submit a proposal before the deadline will result in disqualification of the proposal. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 4
  • 6. 2. RFP SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 2.1. The following RFP Schedule of Events represents the State’s best estimate for this RFP. EVENT DATE TIME (all dates are state business (central time zone) days) 1. RFP Issued October 8, 2009 2. Disability Accommodation Request Deadline 2:00 p.m. October 13, 2009 3. Pre-proposal Conference Call 2:00 p.m. October 14, 2009 4. Notice of Intent to Propose Deadline 2:00 p.m. October 16, 2009 5. Written “Questions & Comments” Deadline 2:00 p.m. October 23, 2009 6. State Response to Written “Questions & Comments” November 5, 2009 7. Proposal Deadline 2:00 p.m. November 16, 2009 8. State Completion of Technical Proposal Evaluations November 30, 2009 9. State Opening & Scoring of Cost Proposals 2:00 p.m. December 1, 2009 10. State Evaluation Notice Released and 2:00 p.m. December 4, 2009 RFP Files Opened for Public Inspection 11. Contract Signing December 16, 2009 12. Contractor Contract Signature Deadline 2:00 p.m. December 23, 2009 2.2. The State reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to adjust the RFP Schedule of Events as it deems necessary. Any adjustment of the Schedule of Events shall constitute an RFP amendment, and the State will communicate such to potential proposers from whom the State has received a Notice of Intent to Propose (refer to section 1.8).
  • 7. 3. PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS 3.1. Proposal Form A response to this RFP must consist of two parts, a Technical Proposal and a Cost Proposal. 3.1.1. Technical Proposal. The RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide details specific requirements for making a Technical Proposal in response to this RFP. The guide includes mandatory requirement items, general qualifications and experience items, and technical qualifications, experience, and approach items all of which must be addressed with a written response and, in some instances, additional documentation. NOTICE: A technical proposal must not include any pricing or cost information. If any pricing or cost information amounts of any type (even pricing relating to other projects) is included in any part of the technical proposal, the state will deem the proposal to be non-responsive and reject it. 3.1.1.1. A Proposer must use the RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide to organize, reference, and draft the Technical Proposal by duplicating the attachment, adding appropriate proposal page numbers as required, and using the guide as a table of contents covering the Technical Proposal. 3.1.1.2. A proposal should be economically prepared, with emphasis on completeness and clarity. A proposal, as well as any reference material presented, must be written in English and must be written on standard 8 ½” x 11” pages (although oversize exhibits are permissible). All proposal pages must be numbered. 3.1.1.3. All information and documentation included in a Technical Proposal should respond to or address a specific requirement detailed in the RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide. All information must be incorporated into a response to a specific requirement and clearly referenced. Any information not meeting these criteria will be deemed extraneous and will not contribute to evaluations. 3.1.1.4. The State may determine a proposal to be non-responsive and reject it if: a. the Proposer fails to organize and properly reference the Technical Proposal as required by this RFP and the RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide; or b. the Technical Proposal document does not appropriately respond to, address, or meet all of the requirements and proposal items detailed in the RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide. 3.1.2. Cost Proposal. A Cost Proposal must be recorded on an exact duplicate of the RFP Attachment 6.3., Cost Proposal & Scoring Guide. NOTICE: If a proposer fails to submit a cost proposal exactly as required, the state will deem the proposal to be non-responsive and reject it. 3.1.2.1. A Proposer must only record the proposed cost exactly as required by the RFP Attachment 6.3., Cost Proposal & Scoring Guide and must NOT record any other rates, amounts, or information. 3.1.2.2. The proposed cost shall incorporate ALL costs for services under the contract for the total contract period. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 6  
  • 8. 3.1.2.3. A Proposer must sign and date the Cost Proposal. 3.1.2.4. A Proposer must submit the Cost Proposal to the State in a sealed package separate from the Technical proposal (as detailed in RFP Sections 3.2.3., et seq.). 3.2. Proposal Delivery A Proposer must deliver a proposal in response to this RFP as detailed below. The State will not accept a proposal delivered by any other method. 3.2.1. A Proposer must ensure that both the original Technical Proposal and Cost Proposal documents meet all form and content requirements detailed within this RFP for such proposals including but not limited to required signatures. 3.2.2. A Proposer must submit original Technical Proposal and Cost Proposal documents and copies as specified below. 3.2.2.1. One (1) original Technical Proposal paper document labeled: “RFP # 31701-11070 TECHNICAL PROPOSAL ORIGINAL” and six (6) copies of the Technical Proposal each in the form of one (1) digital document in “PDF” format properly recorded on its own otherwise blank, standard CD-R recordable disc labeled: “RFP # 31701-11070 TECHNICAL PROPOSAL COPY” The digital copies should not include copies of sealed customer references, however any other discrepancy between the original Technical Proposal document and the digital copies may result in the State rejecting the proposal as non-responsive. 3.2.2.2. One (1) original Cost Proposal paper document labeled: “RFP # 31701-11070 COST PROPOSAL ORIGINAL” and one (1) copy in the form of a digital document in “PDF/XLS” format properly recorded on separate, blank, standard CD-R recordable disc labeled: “RFP # 31701-11070 COST PROPOSAL COPY” In the event of a discrepancy between the original Cost Proposal document and the digital copy, the original, signed document will take precedence. 3.2.3. A Proposer must separate, seal, package, and label the documents and discs for delivery as follows. 3.2.3.1. The Technical Proposal original document and copy discs must be placed in a sealed package that is clearly labeled: “DO NOT OPEN… RFP # 31701-11070 TECHNICAL PROPOSAL FROM [PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME]” 3.2.3.2. The Cost Proposal original document and copy disc must be placed in a separate, sealed package that is clearly labeled: “DO NOT OPEN… RFP # 31701-11070 COST PROPOSAL FROM [PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME]” RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 7
  • 9. 3.2.3.3. The separately, sealed Technical Proposal and Cost Proposal components may be enclosed in a larger package for mailing or delivery, provided that the outermost package is clearly labeled: “RFP # 31701-11070 SEALED TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & SEALED COST PROPOSAL FROM [PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME]” 3.2.4. A Proposer must ensure that the State receives a proposal in response to this RFP no later than the Proposal Deadline time and date detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events at the following address. Dorothy Vaughn Department of Finance and Administration 312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue Suite 1700 Wm Snodgrass TN Tower Nashville, TN 37243-1102 (615) 741-7361Phone (615) 741-6164 FAX Dorothy.vaughn@tn.gov 3.3. Proposal & Proposer Prohibitions 3.3.1. A proposal must not include the Proposer’s own contract terms and conditions. If a proposal contains such terms and conditions, the State, at its sole discretion, may determine the proposal to be a non-responsive counteroffer and reject it. 3.3.2. A proposal must not restrict the rights of the State or otherwise qualify either the offer to deliver services as required by this RFP or the Cost Proposal. If a proposal restricts the rights of the State or otherwise qualifies either the offer to deliver services as required by this RFP or the Cost Proposal, the State, at its sole discretion, may determine the proposal to be a non-responsive counteroffer and reject it. 3.3.3. A proposal must not propose alternate services (i.e., offer services different from those requested and required by this RFP). The State will consider a proposal of alternate services to be non- responsive and reject it. 3.3.4. A Cost Proposal must not result from any collusion between Proposers. The State will reject any Cost Proposal that was not prepared independently without collusion, consultation, communication, or agreement with any other Proposer. Regardless of the time of detection, the State will consider any such actions to be grounds for proposal rejection or contract termination. 3.3.5. A Proposer must not provide, for consideration in this RFP process or subsequent contract negotiations, incorrect information that the Proposer knew or should have known was materially incorrect. If the State determines that a Proposer has provided such incorrect information, the State will deem the Proposer’s proposal non-responsive and reject it. 3.3.6. A Proposer must not submit more than one Technical Proposal and one Cost Proposal in response to this RFP. If a Proposer submits more than one Technical Proposal or more than one Cost Proposal, the State will deem all of the proposals non-responsive and reject them. 3.3.7. A Proposer must not submit a proposal as a prime contractor while also permitting one or more other Proposers to offer the Proposer as a subcontractor in their own proposals. Such may result in the disqualification of all Proposers knowingly involved. This restriction does not, however, prohibit different Proposers from offering the same subcontractor as a part of their proposals (provided that the subcontractor does not also submit a proposal as a prime contractor). RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 8
  • 10. 3.3.8. A Proposer must not be (and the State will not award a contract to): a. an individual who is, or within the past six months has been, an employee or official of the State of Tennessee; b. a company, corporation, or any other contracting entity in which an ownership of two percent (2%) or more is held by an individual who is, or within the past six months has been, an employee or official of the State of Tennessee (this will not apply either to financial interests that have been placed into a “blind trust” arrangement pursuant to which the employee does not have knowledge of the retention or disposition of such interests or to the ownership of publicly traded stocks or bonds where such ownership constitutes less than 2% of the total outstanding amount of the stocks or bonds of the issuing entity); c. a company, corporation, or any other contracting entity which employs an individual who is, or within the past six months has been, an employee or official of the State of Tennessee in a position that would allow the direct or indirect use or disclosure of information, which was obtained through or in connection with his or her employment and not made available to the general public, for the purpose of furthering the private interest or personal profit of any person; or, d. any individual, company, or other entity involved in assisting the State in the development, formulation, or drafting of this RFP or its scope of services (such person or entity being deemed by the State as having information that would afford an unfair advantage over other Proposers). For the purposes of applying the requirements of this RFP subsection 3.3.8., the State will deem an individual to be an employee or official of the State of Tennessee until such time as all compensation for salary, termination pay, and annual leave has been paid. 3.4. Proposal Errors & Revisions A Proposer is liable for any and all proposal errors or omissions. A Proposer will not be allowed to alter or revise proposal documents after the Proposal Deadline time and date detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events unless such is formally requested, in writing, by the State. 3.5. Proposal Withdrawal A Proposer may withdraw a submitted proposal at any time before the Proposal Deadline time and date detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events by submitting a written request signed by an authorized Proposer representative. After withdrawing a proposal, a Proposer may submit another proposal at any time before the Proposal Deadline. 3.6. Proposal of Additional Services If a proposal offers services in addition to those required by and described in this RFP, the State, at its sole discretion, may add such services to the contract awarded as a result of this RFP. Notwithstanding the foregoing, a Proposer must not propose any additional cost amount(s) or rate(s) for additional services. Regardless of any additional services offered in a proposal, the Proposer’s Cost Proposal must only record the proposed cost as required in this RFP and must not record any other rates, amounts, or information. NOTICE: If a Proposer fails to submit a Cost Proposal exactly as required, the State will deem the proposal non-responsive and reject it. 3.7. Proposal Preparation Costs The State will not pay any costs associated with the preparation, submittal, or presentation of any proposal. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 9
  • 11. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 10
  • 12. 4. GENERAL CONTRACTING INFORMATION & REQUIREMENTS 4.1. RFP Amendment The State reserves the right to amend this RFP at any time, provided that it is amended in writing. However, prior to any such amendment, the State will consider whether it would negatively impact the ability of potential proposers to meet the proposal deadline and revise the RFP Schedule of Events if deemed appropriate. If an RFP amendment is issued, the State will convey it to potential proposers who submitted a Notice of Intent to Propose (refer to RFP Section 1.8). A proposal must respond, as required, to the final RFP (including its attachments) as may be amended. 4.2. RFP Cancellation The State reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to cancel or to cancel and reissue this RFP in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. 4.3. State Right of Rejection 4.3.1. Subject to applicable laws and regulations, the State reserves the right to reject, at its sole discretion, any and all proposals. 4.3.2. The State may deem as non-responsive and reject any proposal that does not comply with all terms, conditions, and performance requirements of this RFP. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the State reserves the right to waive, at its sole discretion, a proposal’s minor variances from full compliance with this RFP. If the State waives variances in a proposal, such waiver shall not modify the RFP requirements or excuse the Proposer from full compliance with such, and the State may hold any resulting Contractor to strict compliance with this RFP. 4.4. Assignment & Subcontracting 4.4.1. The Contractor may not subcontract, transfer, or assign any portion of the Contract awarded as a result of this RFP without prior approval of the State. The State reserves the right to refuse approval, at its sole discretion, of any subcontract, transfer, or assignment. 4.4.2. If a Proposer intends to use subcontractors, the proposal in response to this RFP must specifically identify the scope and portions of the work each subcontractor will perform (refer to RFP Attachment 6.2., Section B, General Qualifications & Experience Item B.14.). 4.4.3. Subcontractors identified within a proposal in response to this RFP will be deemed as approved by the State unless the State expressly disapproves one or more of the proposed subcontractors prior to signing the Contract. 4.4.4. The Contractor resulting from this RFP may only substitute another subcontractor for a proposed subcontractor at the discretion of the State and with the State’s prior, written approval. 4.4.5. Notwithstanding any State approval relating to subcontracts, the Contractor resulting from this RFP will be the prime contractor and will be responsible for all work under the Contract. 4.5. Right to Refuse Personnel The State reserves the right to refuse, at its sole discretion and notwithstanding any prior approval, any personnel of the prime contractor or a subcontractor providing service in the performance of a contract resulting from this RFP. The State will document in writing the reason(s) for any rejection of personnel. 4.6. Insurance At any time, the State may require the Contractor resulting from this RFP to provide a valid, Certificate of Insurance indicating current insurance coverage meeting minimum requirements as may be specified by RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 11  
  • 13. this RFP. A failure to provide said documentation will be considered a material breach and grounds for contract termination. 4.7. Licensure 4.7.1. All persons, agencies, firms, or other entities that provide legal or financial opinions, which a Proposer provides for consideration and evaluation by the State as a part of a proposal in response to this RFP, shall be properly licensed to render such opinions. 4.7.2. Before the Contract resulting from this RFP is signed, the apparent successful Proposer (and Proposer employees and subcontractors, as applicable) must hold all necessary, appropriate business and professional licenses to provide service as required. The State may require any Proposer to submit evidence of proper licensure. 4.8. Disclosure of Proposal Contents 4.8.1. Each proposal and all materials submitted to the State in response to this RFP become the property of the State of Tennessee. Selection or rejection of a proposal does not affect this right. By submitting a proposal, a Proposer acknowledges and accepts that the full proposal contents and associated documents will become open to public inspection in accordance with the laws of the State of Tennessee. 4.8.2. The State will hold all proposal information, including both technical and cost information, in confidence during the evaluation process. Notwithstanding the foregoing, a list of actual Proposers submitting timely proposals may be available to the public, upon request, after technical proposals are opened. 4.8.3. Upon completion of proposal evaluations, indicated by public release of an Evaluation Notice, the proposals and associated materials will be open for review by the public in accordance with Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 10-7-504(a)(7). 4.9. Contract Approval and Contract Payments 4.9.1. This RFP and its contractor selection processes do not obligate the State and do not create rights, interests, or claims of entitlement in either the Proposer with the apparent best-evaluated proposal or any other Proposer. State obligations pursuant to a contract award shall commence only after the contract is signed by the State agency head and the Contractor and after the Contract is approved by all other state officials as required by applicable laws and regulations. 4.9.2. No payment will be obligated or made until the relevant Contract is approved as required by applicable statutes and rules of the State of Tennessee. 4.9.2.1. The State shall not be liable for payment of any type associated with the Contract resulting from this RFP (or any amendment thereof) or responsible for any work done by the Contractor, even work done in good faith and even if the Contractor is orally directed to proceed with the delivery of services, if it occurs before the Contract start date or after the Contract end date. 4.9.2.2. All payments relating to this procurement will be made in accordance with the Payment Terms and Conditions of the Contract resulting from this RFP (refer to RFP Attachment 6.6., Pro Forma Contract, Section C). 4.9.2.3. If any provision of the Contract provides direct funding or reimbursement for the competitive purchase of services or items to be delivered to the State as a component of contract performance or otherwise provides for the reimbursement of specified, actual costs, the State will employ all reasonable means and will require all such documentation that it deems necessary to ensure that such purchases were competitive and costs were reasonable, necessary, and actual. The Contractor shall provide reasonable assistance RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 12
  • 14. and access related to such review. Further, the State shall not remit, as funding or reimbursement pursuant to such provisions, any amount(s) which it determines did not result from a reasonably competitive purchase or do not represent reasonable, necessary, and actual costs. 4.10. Contractor Performance The Contractor resulting from this RFP will be responsible for the completion of all service set out in this RFP (including attachments) as may be amended. All service is subject to inspection and evaluation by the State. The State will employ all reasonable means to ensure that service is progressing and being performed in compliance with the Contract, and the Contractor must cooperate with such efforts. 4.11. Contract Amendment During the course of a Contract pursuant to this RFP, the State may request the Contractor to perform additional work within the general scope of the Contract and this RFP, but beyond the specified scope of service, and for which the Contractor may be compensated. In such instances, the State will provide the Contractor a written description of the additional work. The Contractor must respond to the State with a time schedule for accomplishing the additional work and a price for the additional work based on the rates included in the Contractor’s proposal to this RFP. If the State and the Contractor reach an agreement regarding the work and associated compensation, such agreement must be effected by means of a Contract Amendment. Further, any such amendment requiring additional work must be signed by both the State agency head and the Contractor and must be approved by other state officials as required by applicable statutes and rules of the State of Tennessee. The Contractor must not commence additional work until the State has issued a written Contract Amendment with all required approvals. 4.12. Severability If any provision of this RFP is declared by a court to be illegal or in conflict with any law, said decision will not affect the validity of the remaining RFP terms and provisions, and the rights and obligations of the State and Proposers will be construed and enforced as if the RFP did not contain the particular provision held to be invalid. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 13
  • 15. 5. PROPOSAL EVALUATION & CONTRACT AWARD 5.1. Evaluation Categories & Maximum Points The State will consider qualifications, experience, technical approach, and cost in the evaluation of proposals and award points in each of the categories detailed below (up to the maximum evaluation points indicated) to each apparently responsive proposal. EVALUATION CATEGORY MAXIMUM POINTS POSSIBLE General Qualifications & Experience 35 (refer to RFP Attachment 6.2., Section B) Technical Qualifications, Experience & Approach 35 (refer to RFP Attachment 6.2., Section C) Cost Proposal 30 (refer to RFP Attachment 6.3.) 5.2. Evaluation Process The proposal evaluation process is designed to award the contract resulting from this RFP not necessarily to the Proposer offering the lowest cost, but rather to the responsive and responsible Proposer offering the best combination of attributes based upon the evaluation criteria. (“Responsive Proposer” is defined as a Proposer that has submitted a proposal that conforms in all material respects to the RFP. “Responsible Proposer” is defined as a Proposer that has the capacity in all respects to perform fully the contract requirements, and the integrity and reliability which will assure good faith performance.) 5.2.1. Technical Proposal Evaluation. The RFP Coordinator and the Proposal Evaluation Team (consisting of three or more State employees) will use the RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide to manage the Technical Proposal Evaluation and maintain evaluation records. 5.2.1.1. The State reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to request Proposer clarification of a Technical Proposal or to conduct clarification discussions with any or all Proposers. Any such clarification or discussion will be limited to specific sections of the proposal identified by the State. The subject Proposer must put any resulting clarification in writing as may be required and in accordance with any deadline imposed by the State. 5.2.1.2. The RFP Coordinator will review each Technical Proposal to determine compliance with RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide, Section A— Mandatory Requirements. If the RFP Coordinator determines that a proposal may have failed to meet one or more of the mandatory requirements, the Proposal Evaluation Team will review the proposal and document the team’s determination of whether: a. the proposal adequately meets requirements for further evaluation; b. the State will request clarifications or corrections; or, c. the State will determine the proposal non-responsive to the RFP and reject it. 5.2.1.3. Proposal Evaluation Team members will independently evaluate each Technical Proposal (that appears responsive to the RFP) against the evaluation criteria in this RFP, rather than against other proposals and will score each in accordance with the RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide, Section B and Section C. 5.2.1.4. For each proposal evaluated, the RFP Coordinator will calculate the average of the Proposal Evaluation Team member scores for RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 14  
  • 16. & Evaluation Guide, Section B and for Section C, and record each average as the proposal score for the respective Technical Proposal section. 5.2.1.5. Before Cost Proposals are opened, the Proposal Evaluation Team will review the Technical Proposal Evaluation record and any other available information pertinent to whether or not each Proposer is responsive and responsible. If the Proposal Evaluation Team identifies any Proposer that appears not to meet the responsive and responsible thresholds such that the team would not recommend the Proposer for Cost Proposal Evaluation and potential contract award, the team members will fully document the determination. 5.2.2. Cost Proposal Evaluation. The RFP Coordinator will open for evaluation the Cost Proposal of each apparently responsive and responsible Proposer that the Proposal Evaluation Team has effectively recommended for potential contract award and will calculate and record each Cost Proposal score in accordance with the RFP Attachment 6.3., Cost Proposal & Scoring Guide. 5.2.3. Total Proposal Score. The RFP Coordinator will calculate the sum of the Technical Proposal section scores and the Cost Proposal score and record the resulting number as the total score for the subject Proposal (refer to RFP Attachment 6.5., Proposal Score Summary Matrix). 5.3. Contract Award Process 5.3.1 The RFP Coordinator will submit the Proposal Evaluation Team determinations and proposal scores to the head of the procuring agency for consideration along with any other relevant information that might be available and pertinent to contract award. 5.3.2. The procuring agency head will determine the apparent best-evaluated proposal. (To effect a contract award to a Proposer other than the one receiving the highest evaluation process score, the head of the procuring agency must provide written justification and obtain the written approval of the Commissioner of Finance and Administration and the Comptroller of the Treasury.) 5.3.3. The State reserves the right to make an award without further discussion of any proposal. 5.3.4. The State will issue an Evaluation Notice identifying the apparent best-evaluated proposal and make the RFP files available for public inspection at the time and date specified in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. NOTICE: The Evaluation Notice shall not create rights, interests, or claims of entitlement in either the Proposer with apparent best-evaluated proposal or any other Proposer. 5.3.5. The Proposer identified as offering the apparent best-evaluated proposal must sign a contract drawn by the State pursuant to this RFP. The contract shall be substantially the same as the RFP Attachment 6.6., Pro Forma Contract. The Proposer must sign said contract no later than the Contract Signature by Contractor Deadline detailed in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. If the Proposer fails to provide the signed contract by the deadline, the State may determine that the Proposer is non-responsive to this RFP and reject the proposal. 5.3.6. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the State may, at its sole discretion, entertain limited negotiation prior to contract signing and, as a result, revise the pro forma contract terms and conditions or performance requirements in the State’s best interests, PROVIDED THAT such revision of terms and conditions or performance requirements shall NOT materially affect the basis of proposal evaluations or negatively impact the competitive nature of the RFP and contractor selection process. 5.3.7. If the State determines that a proposal is non-responsive and rejects it after opening Cost Proposals, the RFP Coordinator will re-calculate scores for each remaining responsive Cost Proposal to determine (or re-determine) the apparent best-evaluated proposal. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 15
  • 17.   RFP ATTACHMENT 6.1. RFP # 31701-11070 PROPOSAL STATEMENT OF CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES The Proposer must sign and complete the Proposal Statement of Certifications and Assurances below as required, and it must be included in the Technical Proposal (as required by RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide, Section A, Item A.1.). The Proposer does, hereby, expressly affirm, declare, confirm, certify, and assure ALL of the following: 1. The Proposer will comply with all of the provisions and requirements of the RFP. 2. The Proposer will provide all services as defined in the Scope of Services of the RFP Attachment 6.6., Pro Forma Contract for the total contract period. 3. The Proposer accepts and agrees to all terms and conditions set out in the RFP Attachment 6.6., Pro Forma Contract. 4. The Proposer acknowledges and agrees that a contract resulting from the RFP shall incorporate, by reference, all proposal responses as a part of the contract. 5. The Proposer will comply with: (a) the laws of the State of Tennessee; (b) Title VI of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964; (c) Title IX of the federal Education Amendments Act of 1972; (d) the Equal Employment Opportunity Act and the regulations issued there under by the federal government; and, (e) the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations issued there under by the federal government. 6. To the knowledge of the undersigned, the information detailed within the proposal submitted in response to the RFP is accurate. 7. The proposal submitted in response to the RFP was independently prepared, without collusion, under penalty of perjury. 8. No amount shall be paid directly or indirectly to an employee or official of the State of Tennessee as wages, compensation, or gifts in exchange for acting as an officer, agent, employee, subcontractor, or consultant to the Proposer in connection with the RFP or any resulting contract. 9. Both the Technical Proposal and the Cost Proposal submitted in response to the RFP shall remain valid for at least 120 days subsequent to the date of the Cost Proposal opening and thereafter in accordance with any contract pursuant to the RFP. By signing this Proposal Statement of Certifications and Assurances, below, the signatory also certifies legal authority to bind the proposing entity to the provisions of this RFP and any contract awarded pursuant to it. If the signatory is not the Proposer (if an individual) or the Proposer’s company President or Chief Executive Officer, this document must attach evidence showing the individual’s authority to bind the proposing entity. DO NOT SIGN THIS DOCUMENT IF YOU ARE NOT LEGALLY AUTHORIZED TO BIND THE PROPOSING ENTITY SIGNATURE: PRINTED NAME & TITLE: DATE: PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 16  
  • 18. PROPOSER FEDERAL EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (or SSN): RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 17
  • 19.   RFP ATTACHMENT 6.2. — Section A TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & EVALUATION GUIDE SECTION A: MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS. The Proposer must address all items detailed below and provide, in sequence, the information and documentation as required (referenced with the associated item references). The Proposer must also detail the proposal page number for each item in the appropriate space below. The RFP Coordinator will review the proposal to determine if the Mandatory Requirement Items are addressed as required and mark each with pass or fail. For each item that is not addressed as required, the Proposal Evaluation Team must review the proposal and attach a written determination. In addition to the Mandatory Requirement Items, the RFP Coordinator will review each proposal for compliance with all RFP requirements. PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Proposal Page # Item Section A— Mandatory Requirement Items Pass/Fail (Proposer Ref. completes) The Proposal must be delivered to the State no later than the Proposal Deadline specified in the RFP Section 2, Schedule of Events. The Technical Proposal and the Cost Proposal documentation must be packaged separately as required (refer to RFP Section 3.2., et. seq.). The Technical Proposal must NOT contain cost or pricing information of any type. The Technical Proposal must NOT contain any restrictions of the rights of the State or other qualification of the proposal. A Proposer must NOT submit alternate proposals. A Proposer must NOT submit multiple proposals in different forms (as a prime and a sub-contractor). A.1. Provide the Proposal Statement of Certifications and Assurances (RFP Attachment 6.1.) completed and signed by an individual empowered to bind the Proposer to the provisions of this RFP and any resulting contract. The document must be signed without exception or qualification. A.2. Provide a statement, based upon reasonable inquiry, of whether the Proposer or any individual who shall perform work under the contract has a possible conflict of interest (e.g., employment by the State of Tennessee) and, if so, the nature of that conflict. NOTE: Any questions of conflict of interest shall be solely within the discretion of the State, and the State reserves the right to cancel any award. A.3. Provide a current bank reference indicating that the Proposer’s business relationship with the financial institution is in positive standing. Such reference must be written in the form of a standard business letter, signed, and dated within the past three (3) months. A.4. Provide two current positive credit references from vendors with which the Proposer has done business written in the form of standard business letters, signed, and dated within the past three (3) months. A.5. Provide EITHER: (a) an official document or letter from an accredited credit bureau, verified and dated within the last three (3) months and indicating a positive credit rating for the Proposer (NOTE: A credit bureau report number without the full report is insufficient and will not be considered responsive.); OR (b) a Dun & Bradstreet short-form report, verified and dated within the last three (3) months and indicating a positive credit rating for the Proposer. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 17  
  • 20. PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Proposal Page # Item Section A— Mandatory Requirement Items Pass/Fail (Proposer Ref. completes) State Use – RFP Coordinator Signature, Printed Name & Date: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 18
  • 21.   RFP ATTACHMENT 6.2. — SECTION B TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & EVALUATION GUIDE SECTION B: GENERAL QUALIFICATIONS & EXPERIENCE. The Proposer must address all items detailed below and provide, in sequence, the information and documentation as required (referenced with the associated item references). The Proposer must also detail the proposal page number for each item in the appropriate space below. Proposal Evaluation Team members will independently evaluate and assign one score for all responses to Section B— General Qualifications & Experience Items. PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Proposal Page # Item (Proposer Section B— General Qualifications & Experience Items Ref. completes ) B.1. Detail the name, e-mail address, mailing address, telephone number, and facsimile number of the person the State should contact regarding the proposal. B.2. Describe the Proposer’s form of business (i.e., individual, sole proprietor, corporation, non-profit corporation, partnership, limited liability company) and business location (physical location or domicile). B.3. Detail the number of years the Proposer has been in business. B.4. Briefly describe how long the Proposer has been performing the services required by this RFP. B.5. Describe the Proposer’s number of employees, client base, and location of offices. B.6. Provide a statement of whether there have been any mergers, acquisitions, or sales of the Proposer within the last ten years. If so, include an explanation providing relevant details. B.7. Provide a statement of whether the Proposer or, to the Proposer's knowledge, any of the Proposer’s employees, agents, independent contractors, or subcontractors, proposed to provide work on a contract pursuant to this RFP, have been convicted of, pled guilty to, or pled nolo contendere to any felony. If so, include an explanation providing relevant details. B.8. Provide a statement of whether, in the last ten years, the Proposer has filed (or had filed against it) any bankruptcy or insolvency proceeding, whether voluntary or involuntary, or undergone the appointment of a receiver, trustee, or assignee for the benefit of creditors. If so, include an explanation providing relevant details. B.9. Provide a statement of whether there is any material, pending litigation against the Proposer that the Proposer should reasonably believe could adversely affect its ability to meet contract requirements pursuant to this RFP or is likely to have a material adverse effect on the Proposer’s financial condition. If such exists, list each separately, explain the relevant details, and attach the opinion of counsel addressing whether and to what extent it would impair the Proposer’s performance in a contract pursuant to this RFP. NOTE: All persons, agencies, firms, or other entities that provide legal opinions regarding the Proposer must be properly licensed to render such opinions. The State may require the Proposer to submit proof of such licensure detailing the state of licensure and licensure number for each person or entity that renders such opinions. B.10. Provide a statement of whether there are any pending or in progress Securities Exchange Commission investigations involving the Proposer. If such exists, list each separately, explain the relevant details, and attach the opinion of counsel addressing whether and to what extent it will impair the Proposer’s performance in a contract pursuant to this RFP. NOTE: All persons, agencies, firms, or other entities that provide legal opinions regarding the Proposer must be properly licensed to render such opinions. The State may require the Proposer to submit proof of such licensure detailing the state of licensure and licensure number for each person or entity that renders such opinions. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 19  
  • 22. RFP ATTACHMENT 6.2. — SECTION B (continued) PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Proposal Page # Item (Proposer Section B— General Qualifications & Experience Items Ref. completes ) B.11. Provide a brief, descriptive statement detailing evidence of the Proposer’s ability to deliver the services sought under this RFP (e.g., prior experience, training, certifications, resources, program and quality management systems, etc.). B.12. Provide a narrative description of the proposed project team, its members, and organizational structure along with an organizational chart identifying the key people who will be assigned to accomplish the work required by this RFP, illustrating the lines of authority, and designating the individual responsible for the completion of each service component and deliverable of the RFP. B.13. Provide a personnel roster listing the names of key people who the Proposer will assign to perform duties or services required by this RFP along with the estimated number of hours that each individual will devote to that performance. Follow the personnel roster with a resume for each of the people listed. The resumes must detail the individual’s title, education, current position with the Proposer, and employment history. B.14. Provide a statement of whether the Proposer intends to use subcontractors to accomplish the work required by this RFP, and if so, detail: (a) the names of the subcontractors along with the contact person, mailing address, telephone number, and e-mail address for each; (b) a description of the scope and portions of the work each subcontractor will perform; and (c) a statement specifying that each proposed subcontractor has expressly assented to being proposed as a subcontractor in the Proposer’s response to this RFP. B.15. Provide documentation of the Proposer’s commitment to diversity as represented by its business strategy, business relationships, and workforce— this documentation should detail all of the following: (a) a description of the Proposer’s existing programs and procedures designed to encourage and foster commerce with business enterprises owned by minorities, women, persons with a disability and small business enterprises; (b) a listing of the Proposer’s current contracts with business enterprises owned by minorities, women, persons with a disability and small business enterprises, including the following information: (i) contract description and total value (ii) contractor name and ownership characteristics (i.e., ethnicity, sex, disability) (iii) contractor contact and telephone number; (c) an estimate of the level of participation by business enterprises owned by minorities, women, persons with a disability and small business enterprises in a contract awarded to the Proposer pursuant to this RFP, including the following information: (i) participation estimate (expressed as a percent of the total contract value that will be dedicated to business with subcontractors and supply contractors having such ownership characteristics — PERCENTAGES ONLY — DO NOT INCLUDE DOLLAR AMOUNTS) (ii) descriptions of anticipated contracts (iii) names and ownership characteristics (i.e., ethnicity, sex, disability) of anticipated subcontractors and supply contractors anticipated; and (d) the percent of the Proposer’s total current employees by ethnicity, sex, and disability. NOTE: Proposers that demonstrate a commitment to diversity will advance State efforts to expand opportunity to do business with the State as contractors and sub-contractors. Proposal evaluations will recognize the positive qualifications and experience of a Proposer that does business with enterprises owned by minorities, women, persons with a disability and small business enterprises and that offers a diverse workforce to meet service needs. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 20
  • 23. RFP ATTACHMENT 6.2. — SECTION B (continued) PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Proposal Page # Item (Proposer Section B— General Qualifications & Experience Items Ref. completes ) B.16. Provide a statement of whether or not the Proposer has any current contracts with the State of Tennessee or has completed any contracts with the State of Tennessee within the previous 5-year period. If so, provide the following information for all of the current and completed contracts: (a) the name, title, telephone number and e-mail address of the State contact knowledgeable about the contract; (b) the procuring State agency name; (c) a brief description of the contract’s scope of services; (d) the contract term; and (e) the contract number. NOTES:  Current or prior contracts with the State are not a prerequisite and are not required for the maximum evaluation score, and the existence of such contracts with the State will not automatically result in the addition or deduction of evaluation points.  Each evaluator will generally consider the results of inquiries by the State regarding all contracts noted. B.17. Provide customer references from individuals (who are not current or former officials or staff of the State of Tennessee) for projects similar to the services sought under this RFP and which represent:  two (2) of the larger accounts currently serviced by the Proposer, and  three (3) completed projects. All references must be provided in the form of standard reference questionnaires that have been fully completed by the individual providing the reference as required. The standard reference questionnaire, which must be used and completed as required, is detailed at RFP Attachment 6.4. References that are not completed as required will be considered non-responsive and will not be considered. The Proposer will be solely responsible for obtaining the fully completed reference questionnaires, and for including them within the Proposer’s sealed Technical Proposal. In order to obtain and submit the completed reference questionnaires, as required, follow the process detailed below. (a) “Customize” the standard reference questionnaire at RFP Attachment 6.4. by adding the subject Proposer’s name, and make exact duplicates for completion by references. (b) Send the customized reference questionnaires to each individual chosen to provide a reference along with a new standard #10 envelope. (c) Instruct the person that will provide a reference for the Proposer to: (i) complete the reference questionnaire (on the form provided or prepared, completed, and printed using an exact duplicate of the document); (ii) sign and date the completed, reference questionnaire; (iii) seal the completed, signed, and dated, reference questionnaire within the envelope provided; (iv) sign his or her name in ink across the sealed portion of the envelope; and (v) return the sealed envelope containing the completed reference questionnaire directly to the Proposer (the Proposer may wish to give each reference a deadline, such that the Proposer will be able to collect all required references in time to include them within the sealed Technical Proposal). (d) Do NOT open the sealed references upon receipt. (e) Enclose all sealed reference envelopes within a larger, labeled envelope for inclusion in the Technical Proposal as required. NOTES: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 21
  • 24. RFP ATTACHMENT 6.2. — SECTION B (continued) PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Proposal Page # Item (Proposer Section B— General Qualifications & Experience Items Ref. completes )  The State will not accept late references or references submitted by any means other than that which is described above, and each reference questionnaire submitted must be completed as required.  The State will not review more than the number of required references indicated above.  While the State will base its reference check on the contents of the sealed reference envelopes included in the Technical Proposal package, the State reserves the right to confirm and clarify information detailed in the completed reference questionnaires, and may consider clarification responses in the evaluation of references.  The State is under no obligation to clarify any reference information. SCORE (for all Section B—Qualifications & Experience Items above): (maximum possible score = 35) State Use – Evaluator Identification: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 22
  • 25.   RFP ATTACHMENT 6.2. — SECTION C TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & EVALUATION GUIDE SECTION C: TECHNICAL QUALIFICATIONS, EXPERIENCE & APPROACH. The Proposer must address all items (below) and provide, in sequence, the information and documentation as required (referenced with the associated item references). The Proposer must also detail the proposal page number for each item in the appropriate space below. A Proposal Evaluation Team, made up of three or more State employees, will independently evaluate and score the proposal’s response to each item. Each evaluator will use the following whole number, raw point scale for scoring each item: 0 = little value 1 = poor 2 = fair 3 = satisfactory 4 = good 5 = excellent The RFP Coordinator will multiply the Item Score by the associated Evaluation Factor (indicating the relative emphasis of the item in the overall evaluation). The resulting product will be the item’s raw, weighted score for purposes of calculating the section score as indicated. PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Proposal Raw Page # Item Section C— Technical Qualifications, Item Evaluatio Weighted (Proposer Ref. Experience & Approach Items Score n Factor Score completes) C.1. Provide a narrative that illustrates the Proposer’s understanding of the State’s requirements and project 23 schedule. C.2. Provide a narrative that illustrates how the Proposer will complete the scope of services, accomplish required 23 objectives, and meet the State’s project schedule. C.3. Provide a narrative that illustrates how the Proposer will manage the project, ensure completion of the scope of 23 services, and accomplish required objectives within the State’s project schedule. Provide a copy of a sample service-learning program evaluation previously prepared by the proposer and suitable for distribution to policy-makers. Provide a brief narrative to 31 compare and contrast work to be completed under this contract with the sample evaluation. The RFP Coordinator will use this sum and the formula below to calculate the Total Raw Weighted Score: section score. All calculations will use and result in numbers rounded to two (2) places to the right of the decimal point. (sum of Raw Weighted Scores above) Total Raw Weighted Score X 35 Maximum Possible Raw Weighted Score = SCORE: (maximum possible score) (i.e., 5 x the sum of item weights above) State Use – Evaluator Identification: State Use – RFP Coordinator Signature, Printed Name & Date: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE     23  
  • 26.   RFP ATTACHMENT 6.3. COST PROPOSAL & SCORING GUIDE NOTICE: THIS COST PROPOSAL MUST BE COMPLETED EXACTLY AS REQUIRED COST PROPOSAL SCHEDULE— The Cost Proposal, detailed below, shall indicate the proposed price for the entire scope of service including all services defined in the Scope of Services of the RFP Attachment 6.6., Pro Forma Contract and for the entire contract period. The Cost Proposal shall remain valid for at least 120 days subsequent to the date of the Cost Proposal opening and thereafter in accordance with any contract resulting from this RFP. All monetary amounts shall be in U.S. currency and limited to two (2) places to the right of the decimal point. DO NOT LEAVE THE COST CELL “BLANK.” The State shall deem the “blank” cell as non-responsive and the State shall reject it. The Proposer may enter zero (0) in a required proposed cost cell. The Proposer must enter only one rate in the cost cell; the Proposer must NOT enter more than one rate or a range of rates in the cost cell. The Proposer must NOT add any other information to the Cost Proposal. NOTICE: The Evaluation Factor associated with each cost item is for evaluation purposes only. The evaluation factors do NOT and should NOT be construed as any type of volume guarantee or minimum purchase quantity. The evaluation factors shall NOT create rights, interests, or claims of entitlement in the Proposer. Notwithstanding the cost items herein, pursuant to the second paragraph of the pro forma contract section C.1. (refer to RFP Attachment 6.6.), “The State is under no obligation to request work from the Contractor in any specific dollar amounts or to request any work at all from the Contractor during any period of this Contract.” This Cost Proposal must be signed, in the space below, by an individual empowered to bind the proposing entity to the provisions of this RFP and any contract awarded pursuant to it. If said individual is not the President or Chief Executive Officer, this document must attach evidence showing the individual’s authority to legally bind the proposing entity. PROPOSER SIGNATURE: PRINTED NAME & TITLE: DATE: PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Evaluation Evaluation Cost Cost Item Description Proposed Cost Factor (cost x factor) Approved evaluation workplan for both $ NUMBER programs, school-based survey instrument and community-based partner assessment instrument developed and submitted to the 1 state.- See Pro forma contract Section A.6 Program Year 1; Section A.5.2; Participation in subgrantee spring and fall $ NUMBER per subgrantee meetings - See Pro forma contract Section A.4 6 meeting Subgrantee technical assistance phone calls $ NUMBER per Hour and/or site visits - See Pro forma contract 120 Section A.5.7 Year One: Collection of all pre-and post-grantee $ NUMBER per semester surveys for each semester – See Pro forma 2 Contract Section A.5.4 Year Two: Collection of all pre-and post-grantee $ NUMBER per semester surveys for each semester – See Pro forma 2 contract Section A.5.4 RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE   24  
  • 27. RFP ATTACHMENT 6.3. (continued) PROPOSER LEGAL ENTITY NAME: Evaluation Evaluation Cost Cost Item Description Proposed Cost Factor (cost x factor) Year Three: Collection of all pre-and post- $ NUMBER per semester grantee surveys for each semester  ­  See Pro 2 forma contract Section A.5.4 Annual Summary Report - See Pro forma $ NUMBER per year 3 contract Section A.3 Final Cumulative Results Report -See Pro forma 1 contract Section A.3 $ NUMBER EVALUATION COST AMOUNT (sum of evaluation costs above): The RFP Coordinator will use this sum and the formula below to calculate the Cost Proposal Score. Numbers rounded to two (2) places to the right of the decimal point will be standard for calculations. lowest evaluation cost amount from all proposals x 30 = SCORE: evaluation cost amount being evaluated (maximum section score) State Use – RFP Coordinator Signature, Printed Name & Date: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 25
  • 28. RFP ATTACHMENT 6.4. REFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE The standard reference questionnaire provided on the following pages of this attachment MUST be completed by all individuals offering a reference for the Proposer. The Proposer will be solely responsible for obtaining completed reference questionnaires as required (refer to RFP Attachment 6.2., Technical Proposal & Evaluation Guide, Section B, Item B.17.), and for enclosing the sealed reference envelopes within the Proposer’s Technical Proposal. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 26
  • 29. RFP # 31701-11070 PROPOSAL REFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE REFERENCE SUBJECT: PROPOSER NAME (completed by proposer before reference is requested) The “reference subject” specified above, intends to submit a proposal to the State of Tennessee in response to the Request for Proposals (RFP) indicated. As a part of such proposal, the reference subject must include a number of completed and sealed reference questionnaires (using this form). Each individual responding to this reference questionnaire is asked to follow these instructions:  complete this questionnaire (either using the form provided or an exact duplicate of this document);  sign and date the completed questionnaire;  seal the completed, signed, and dated questionnaire in a new standard #10 envelope;  sign in ink across the sealed portion of the envelope; and  return the sealed envelope containing the completed questionnaire directly to the reference subject. (1) What is the name of the individual, company, organization, or entity responding to this reference questionnaire? (2) Please provide the following information about the individual completing this reference questionnaire on behalf of the above-named individual, company, organization, or entity. NAME: TITLE: TELEPHONE # E-MAIL ADDRESS: (3) What services does /did the reference subject provide to your company or organization? (4) What is the level of your overall satisfaction with the reference subject as a vendor of the services described above? Please respond by circling the appropriate number on the scale below. 1 2 3 4 5 least most satisfied satisfied RFP # 31701-11070 PROPOSAL REFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE — PAGE 2 RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 27
  • 30. If you circled 3 or less above, what could the reference subject have done to improve that rating? (5) If the services that the reference subject provided to your company or organization are completed, were the services completed in compliance with the terms of the contract, on time, and within budget? If not, please explain. (6) If the reference subject is still providing services to your company or organization, are these services being provided in compliance with the terms of the contract, on time, and within budget? If not, please explain. (7) How satisfied are you with the reference subject’s ability to perform based on your expectations and according to the contractual arrangements? (8) In what areas of service delivery does /did the reference subject excel? (9) In what areas of service delivery does /did the reference subject fall short? (10) What is the level of your satisfaction with the reference subject’s project management structures, processes, and personnel? Please respond by circling the appropriate number on the scale below. 1 2 3 4 5 least most satisfied satisfied What, if any, comments do you have regarding the score selected above? RFP # 31701-11070 PROPOSAL REFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE — PAGE 3 RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 28
  • 31. (11) Considering the staff assigned by the reference subject to deliver the services described in response to question 3 above, how satisfied are you with the technical abilities, professionalism, and interpersonal skills of the individuals assigned? Please respond by circling the appropriate number on the scale below. 1 2 3 4 5 least most satisfied satisfied What, if any, comments do you have regarding the score selected above? (12) Would you contract again with the reference subject for the same or similar services? Please respond by circling the appropriate number on the scale below. 1 2 3 4 5 least most satisfied satisfied What, if any, comments do you have regarding the score selected above? REFERENCE SIGNATURE: (by the individual completing this request for reference information) (must be the same as the signature across the envelope seal) DATE: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 29
  • 32. RFP ATTACHMENT 6.5. PROPOSAL SCORE SUMMARY MATRIX PROPOSER NAME PROPOSER NAME PROPOSER NAME GENERAL QUALIFICATIONS & EXPERIENCE (maximum: 35) EVALUATOR NAME EVALUATOR NAME REPEAT AS NECESSARY AVERAGE: AVERAGE: AVERAGE: TECHNICAL QUALIFICATIONS, EXPERIENCE & APPROACH (maximum: 35) EVALUATOR NAME EVALUATOR NAME REPEAT AS NECESSARY AVERAGE: AVERAGE: AVERAGE: COST PROPOSAL SCORE: SCORE: SCORE: (maximum: 30) TOTAL PROPOSAL EVALUATION SCORE: (maximum: 100) RFP Coordinator Signature, Printed Name & Date: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 30
  • 33. RFP ATTACHMENT 6.6. RFP # 31701-11070 PRO FORMA CONTRACT The pro forma contract detailed in following pages of this exhibit contains some “blanks” (signified by descriptions in capital letters) that will be completed with appropriate information in the final contract resulting from the RFP. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 31
  • 34. PRO FORMA CONTRACT DRAFTED IN COMPLIANCE WITH CURRENT APPLICABLE MODEL POLICY CONTRACT BETWEEN THE STATE OF TENNESSEE, DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER TENNESSEE AND CONTRACTOR NAME This Contract, by and between the State of Tennessee, Department of Finance and Administration, Volunteer Tennessee, hereinafter referred to as the “State” and CONTRACTOR LEGAL ENTITY NAME, hereinafter referred to as the “Contractor,” is for the provision of school-based and community-based service-learning program evaluation, as further defined in the "SCOPE OF SERVICES." The Contractor is A/AN INDIVIDUAL, FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION, NON-PROFIT CORPORATION, SPECIAL PURPOSE CORPORATION OR ASSOCIATION, PARTNERSHIP, JOINT VENTURE, OR LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Contractor Federal Employer Identification or Social Security Number: ID NUMBER Contractor Place of Incorporation or Organization: LOCATION A. SCOPE OF SERVICES: A.1. The Contractor shall provide all service and deliverables as required, described, and detailed by this Scope of Services and shall meet all service and delivery timelines specified in the Scope of Services section or elsewhere in this Contract. A.2. Evaluation. Contractor shall provide an evaluation of 2009-2012 Tennessee Learn & Serve America school-based formula and 2009-2011 Tennessee Learn and Serve America community- based subgrantees, which will involve development and implementation of quasi-experimental research designs to measure student effects from service-learning using a large enough data set to be representative of the school-based service-learning programs and the community-based service-learning programs and any federally required elements in the pre- and post-test components. A.3. Results Report Development. Contractor shall develop and submit to the State three high- quality evaluation annual reports, each of which accomplishes the following: • provides a one page executive summary • explains complex evaluation data in a format that is easily understandable to a wide variety of audiences • uses compelling images of students engaged in service-learning (can be stock photos) • is colorful and well-designed • uses charts, graphics and maps to easily illustrate scope and effects of service-learning programs • is segmented in a logical flow that builds from start to finish, including a table of contents • provides a powerful summary that inspires others to action • cites appropriate reference sources and footnote information • annual reports shall be provided in electronic format and 10 printed copies. The electronic format of the reports should be adaptable by the State for access to people of all abilities (alternative formats, i.e. Braille or large print) • includes information based on the 2009-2012 Learn and Serve evaluations that can be separated by school-based programs and the community-based programs. • contains stories, quotes and first-hand reflections from participants and practitioners (as provided by the State) • uses third-party testimonials from grantee partners and other stakeholders (as provided by the State) RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 32  
  • 35. A.4. Subgrantee Training and Technical Assistance. Contractor shall participate in two 1-2 day subgrantee trainings annually to insure effectiveness of subgrantee roles in evaluation activities. Contractor shall also provide follow-up technical assistance to program directors by telephone and through site visits to be determined in consultation with the State based on subgrantee need for intensive assistance or observation. Contractor shall provide subgrantees with assistance designating control groups and distributing and collecting evaluation surveys. Contractor shall also provide subgrantees with individual evaluation results if requested. A.5. Evaluation A.5.1 Develop an evaluation program of school-based and community-based Learn and Serve America programs in Tennessee, using a quasi-experimental research design, that appropriately builds on previous Tennessee and national evaluation programs, including utilization of any federal required student surveys or survey questions. Research design must use data set of sufficient size to be representative of the school-based and community-based service-learning programs. A.5.2. Utilize appropriate surveys for data collection. For school-based program: Design pre- and post-project student surveys reflective of current national best practices and federal requirements in the fields of service-learning, education, and social services for at-risk youth and based upon nationally referenced norms of student performance. Develop community partner service-learning impact assessment survey. For community-based program: Use existing electronic Youth Asset Survey for evaluation (Attachment 2). A.5.3. Provide instruction to sub-grantees on administering surveys. A.5.4. Collect data from subgrantees. For school-based program: Gather individual student data from up to 10 school district sub-grantees twice (pre- and post-) each semester for each school year for 2 ½ years. Perform statistical analysis. Gather and analyze community partner service-learning impact assessment surveys. For community-based program: Gather individual student data (Youth Asset Survey can be submitted electronically) from 3 community-based organizations for 2 years. Perform statistical analysis. A.5.5. Generate an annual summary and cumulative report of the effectiveness of service-learning in Tennessee each year for three years suitable for printing, general distribution, and electronic posting. A.5.6. Adapt presentation of findings as necessary to meet federal reporting requirements. Evaluation results will be reported as the annual outcomes for the grants; future funding of approximately $600,000 annually depends in part on these reports. A.5.7. Provide technical assistance to teachers by telephone in at least two rounds of structured calls and through site visits to be determined in consultation with the State based on subgrantee need for intensive assistance. Documentation of calls will include grantee and contact person called, date and beginning and end times of calls, and key topics discussed. A.6. Project Schedule. The Contractor shall follow project schedule below. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 33  
  • 36. Program Year 1: School-based Program Community-based Program December 2009 • Meet with staff at Volunteer TN to • Meet with staff at Volunteer TN to review review goals and workplan goals and workplan • Develop pre-and post-project surveys • Join conference call with Volunteer TN and for subgrantees subgrantees to give evaluation instructions and information about the Youth Asset • Join conference call with Volunteer TN Survey and subgrantees to give evaluation instructions and information • Begin technical assistance phones calls (or site visits) as needed and in consultation with State to maximize evaluation compliance and program quality. • Pre-surveys to subgrantees for beginning of Spring 2010 semester January 2010 • Begin technical assistance phones calls (or site visits) as needed and in consultation with State to maximize evaluation compliance and program quality • Youth Asset Survey to community-based subgrantees February/March • Participate in Statewide Service- • Participate in Statewide Service-Learning 2010 Learning Conference (subgrantees will Conference (subgrantees will be in be in attendance) as requested by the attendance) as requested by the State State (refer to A.4. of this contract) and (refer to A.4. of this contract) and provide provide instructions to subgrantees on instructions to subgrantees on administering student surveys administering student surveys April/May 2010 • Post-surveys to subgrantees • Youth Asset Post-survey to subgrantees • Collect pre-and post surveys at end of semester from subgrantees • Distribute and collect community partner impact assessment surveys from subgrantees June 2010 • Submit any outstanding invoices for payment of services to be processed before State fiscal year-end August 2010 • Pre-surveys to subgrantees for fall • Collect Youth Asset post-surveys from semester 2010 summer programs • Youth Asset pre-surveys to subgrantees for fall 2010 activities October 2010 • Provide Annual Summary and • Provide Annual Summary and Cumulative Cumulative Report that meets Report that meets requirements specified requirements specified in Section A in Section A Scope of Services of this Scope of Services of this contract for contract for school and community-based school and community-based programs programs Program Year 2: September 2010 • Participate in Subgrantee training as • Participate in Subgrantee training as RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 34  
  • 37. requested by State and provide requested by State and provide instructions to subgrantees on instructions to subgrantees on administering student surveys. Provide administering student surveys. Provide subgrantees individual information about subgrantees individual information about data results data results • Post-surveys to subgrantees for end of • Youth Asset post-surveys to subgrantees fall semester 2010 for end of fall semester 2010 December 2010 • Continue technical assistance phones • Continue technical assistance phones calls (or site visits) as needed and in calls (or site visits) as needed and in consultation with State to maximize consultation with State to maximize evaluation compliance and program evaluation compliance and program quality. quality. • Collect pre and post surveys from Fall • Collect Youth Asset pre- and post-surveys 2010 from fall 2010 • Pre-surveys to subgrantees for • Youth Asset Pre-surveys to subgrantees beginning of Spring 2011 semester for beginning of Spring 2011 semester February/March • Participate in Statewide Service- • Participate in Statewide Service-Learning 2011 Learning Conference (subgrantees will Conference (subgrantees will be in be in attendance) as requested by the attendance) as requested by the State State (refer to A.4. of this contract) and (refer to A.4. of this contract) and provide provide instructions to subgrantees on instructions to subgrantees on administering student surveys administering student surveys April/May 2011 • Post-surveys to subgrantees for spring • Youth Asset post-surveys to subgrantees 2011 semester for spring/summer 2011 activities • Collect pre- and post-surveys from spring 2011 • Distribute and collect community partner impact assessment surveys from subgrantees June 2011 • Submit any outstanding invoices for • Submit any outstanding invoices for payment of services to be processed payment of services to be processed before State fiscal year-end before State fiscal year-end August 2011 • Pre-surveys to subgrantees for fall • Collect Youth Asset pre- and post-surveys semester 2011 from summer programs October 2011 • Provide Annual Summary and • Provide Annual Summary and Cumulative Cumulative Report that meets Report that meets requirements specified requirements specified in Section A in Section A Scope of Services of this Scope of Services of this contract for contract for school and community-based school and community-based programs programs Program Year 3: September 2011 • Participate in Subgrantee training as requested by State and provide instructions to subgrantees on administering student surveys. Provide subgrantees individual information about data results • Post-surveys to subgrantees for end of fall semester 2011 RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 35  
  • 38. December 2011 • Continue technical assistance phones calls (or site visits) as needed and in consultation with State to maximize evaluation compliance and program quality. • Collect pre and post surveys from Fall 2011 • Pre-surveys to subgrantees for beginning of Spring 2012 semester February/March • Participate in Statewide Service- 2012 Learning Conference (subgrantees will be in attendance) as requested by the State (refer to A.4. of this contract) and provide instructions to subgrantees on administering student surveys April/May 2012 • Post-surveys to subgrantees for spring 2012 semester • Collect pre- and post-surveys • Distribute and collect community partner impact assessment surveys from subgrantees June 2012 • Submit any outstanding invoices for payment of services to be processed before State fiscal year-end October 2012 • Provide Annual Summary and Cumulative Report that meets requirements specified in Section A Scope of Services of this contract for school-based program November 30, 2012 • Contract End date. Submit all contract closeout documentation as requested by the State, including final invoice for payment of services B. CONTRACT TERM: B.1. Term. This Contract shall be effective for the period commencing on January 1, 2010 and ending on December 31, 2012. The State shall have no obligation for services rendered by the Contractor which are not performed within the specified period. B.2. Term Extension. The State reserves the right to extend this Contract for an additional period or periods of time representing increments of no more than one year and a total contract term of no more than five (5) years, provided that such an extension of the contract term is effected prior to the current, contract expiration date by means of an amendment to the Contract. If the extension of the Contract necessitates additional funding beyond that which was included in the original Contract, the increase in the State’s maximum liability will also be effected through an amendment to the Contract, and shall be based upon payment rates provided for in the original Contract. C. PAYMENT TERMS AND CONDITIONS: RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 36  
  • 39. C.1. Maximum Liability. In no event shall the maximum liability of the State under this Contract exceed WRITTEN DOLLAR AMOUNT ($NUMBER). The payment rates in Section C.3 shall constitute the entire compensation due the Contractor for the Service and all of the Contractor's obligations hereunder regardless of the difficulty, materials or equipment required. The payment rates include, but are not limited to, all applicable taxes, fees, overheads, and all other direct and indirect costs incurred or to be incurred by the Contractor. The Contractor is not entitled to be paid the maximum liability for any period under the Contract or any extensions of the Contract for work not requested by the State. The maximum liability represents available funds for payment to the Contractor and does not guarantee payment of any such funds to the Contractor under this Contract unless the State requests work and the Contractor performs said work. In which case, the Contractor shall be paid in accordance with the payment rates detailed in Section C.3. The State is under no obligation to request work from the Contractor in any specific dollar amounts or to request any work at all from the Contractor during any period of this Contract. C.2. Compensation Firm. The payment rates and the maximum liability of the State under this Contract are firm for the duration of the Contract and are not subject to escalation for any reason unless amended. C.3. Payment Methodology. The Contractor shall be compensated based on the payment rates herein for units of service authorized by the State in a total amount not to exceed the Contract Maximum Liability established in Section C.1. a. The Contractor’s compensation shall be contingent upon the satisfactory completion of units, milestones, or increments of service defined in Section A. b. The Contractor shall be compensated for said units, milestones, or increments of service based upon the following payment rates: Amount EVALUATION AND TRAINING SERVICE DELIVERABLES (per compensable increment) Approved evaluation workplan for both programs, school-based $ NUMBER survey instrument and community-based partner assessment instrument developed and submitted to the state -See Scope of Services, Section A.6 - Program Year 1; Section A.5.2 Participation in subgrantee spring and fall meetings - See $ NUMBER each Scope of Services, Section A.4 Subgrantee technical assistance phone calls and/or site visits - $ NUMBER per Hour (Documentation Required, see Scope of Services, Section A.5.7) Year One: Collection of all pre-and post-grantee surveys for each $ NUMBER per semester semester - See Scope of Services, Section A.5.4 Year Two: Collection of all pre-and post-grantee surveys for each $ NUMBER per semester semester - See Scope of Services, Section A.5.4 Year Three: Collection of all pre-and post-grantee surveys for $ NUMBER per semester each semester - See Scope of Services, Section A.5.4 Annual Summary report - See Scope of Services, Section A.3 $ NUMBER per year Final Cumulative Report - See Scope of Services, Section A.3 $ NUMBER C.4. Travel Compensation. The Contractor shall not be compensated or reimbursed for travel, meals, or lodging. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 37  
  • 40. C.5. Invoice Requirements. The Contractor shall invoice the State only for completed increments of service and for the amount stipulated in Section C.3, above, and as required below prior to any payment. a. The Contractor shall submit invoices no more often than monthly, with all necessary supporting documentation, to: Meredith Freeman, Deputy Director Department of Finance and Administration Volunteer Tennessee 12th Floor, William Snodgrass TN Tower 312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue Nashville, TN 37243-1102 b. The Contractor agrees that each invoice submitted shall clearly and accurately (all calculations must be extended and totaled correctly) detail the following required information. (1) Invoice/Reference Number (assigned by the Contractor); (2) Invoice Date; (3) Invoice Period (period to which all invoiced charges are applicable); (4) Contract Number (assigned by the State to this Contract); (5) Account Name: Department of Finance and Administration, Volunteer Tennessee; (6) Account/Customer Number (uniquely assigned by the Contractor to the above- referenced Account Name); (7) Contractor Name; (8) Contractor Federal Employer Identification Number or Social Security Number (as referenced in this Contract); (9) Contractor Contact (name, phone, and/or fax for the individual to contact with billing questions); (10) Contractor Remittance Address; (11) Complete Itemization of Charges, which shall detail the following: i. Service or Milestone Description (including name /title as applicable) of each service invoiced; ii. Number of Completed Units, Increments, Hours, or Days as applicable, of each service invoiced; iii. Applicable Payment Rate (as stipulated in Section C.3.) of each service invoiced; iv. Amount Due by Service; and v. Total Amount Due for the invoice period. c. The Contractor understands and agrees that an invoice to the State under this Contract shall: (1) include only charges for service described in Contract Section A and in accordance with payment terms and conditions set forth in Contract Section C; (2) not include any future work but will only be submitted for completed service; and (3) not include sales tax or shipping charges. d. The Contractor agrees that timeframe for payment (and any discounts) begins when the State is in receipt of each invoice meeting the minimum requirements above. e. The Contractor shall complete and sign a "Substitute W-9 Form” provided to the Contractor by the State. The taxpayer identification number contained in the Substitute W-9 submitted to the State shall agree to the Federal Employer Identification Number or RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 38  
  • 41. Social Security Number referenced in this Contract for the Contractor. The Contractor shall not invoice the State for services until the State has received this completed form. C.6. Payment of Invoice. The payment of the invoice by the State shall not prejudice the State's right to object to or question any invoice or matter in relation thereto. Such payment by the State shall neither be construed as acceptance of any part of the work or service provided nor as an approval of any of the amounts invoiced therein. C.7. Invoice Reductions. The Contractor's invoice shall be subject to reduction for amounts included in any invoice or payment theretofore made which are determined by the State, on the basis of audits conducted in accordance with the terms of this Contract, not to constitute proper remuneration for compensable services. C.8. Deductions. The State reserves the right to deduct from amounts which are or shall become due and payable to the Contractor under this or any Contract between the Contractor and the State of Tennessee any amounts which are or shall become due and payable to the State of Tennessee by the Contractor. C.9. Automatic Deposits. The Contractor shall complete and sign an "Authorization Agreement for Automatic Deposit (ACH Credits) Form." This form shall be provided to the Contractor by the State. Once this form has been completed and submitted to the State by the Contractor all payments to the Contractor, under this or any other Contract the Contractor has with the State of Tennessee shall be made by Automated Clearing House (ACH). The Contractor shall not invoice the State for services until the Contractor has completed this form and submitted it to the State. D. STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS: D.1. Required Approvals. The State is not bound by this Contract until it is approved by the appropriate State officials in accordance with applicable Tennessee State laws and regulations. D.2. Modification and Amendment. This Contract may be modified only by a written amendment executed by all parties hereto and approved by the appropriate Tennessee State officials in accordance with applicable Tennessee State laws and regulations. D.3. Termination for Convenience. The State may terminate this Contract without cause for any reason. Said termination shall not be deemed a Breach of Contract by the State. The State shall give the Contractor at least thirty (30) days written notice before the effective termination date. The Contractor shall be entitled to receive compensation for satisfactory, authorized service completed as of the termination date, but in no event shall the State be liable to the Contractor for compensation for any service which has not been rendered. Upon such termination, the Contractor shall have no right to any actual general, special, incidental, consequential, or any other damages whatsoever of any description or amount. D.4. Termination for Cause. If the Contractor fails to properly perform its obligations under this Contract in a timely or proper manner, or if the Contractor violates any terms of this Contract, the State shall have the right to immediately terminate the Contract and withhold payments in excess of fair compensation for completed services. Notwithstanding the above, the Contractor shall not be relieved of liability to the State for damages sustained by virtue of any breach of this Contract by the Contractor. D.5. Subcontracting. The Contractor shall not assign this Contract or enter into a subcontract for any of the services performed under this Contract without obtaining the prior written approval of the State. If such subcontracts are approved by the State, they shall contain, at a minimum, sections of this Contract below pertaining to "Conflicts of Interest," "Nondiscrimination," and “Records” (as identified by the section headings). Notwithstanding any use of approved subcontractors, the Contractor shall be the prime contractor and shall be responsible for all work performed. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 39  
  • 42. D.6. Conflicts of Interest. The Contractor warrants that no part of the total Contract Amount shall be paid directly or indirectly to an employee or official of the State of Tennessee as wages, compensation, or gifts in exchange for acting as an officer, agent, employee, subcontractor, or consultant to the Contractor in connection with any work contemplated or performed relative to this Contract. D.7. Nondiscrimination. The Contractor hereby agrees, warrants, and assures that no person shall be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination in the performance of this Contract or in the employment practices of the Contractor on the grounds of disability, age, race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or any other classification protected by Federal, Tennessee State constitutional, or statutory law. The Contractor shall, upon request, show proof of such nondiscrimination and shall post in conspicuous places, available to all employees and applicants, notices of nondiscrimination. D.8. Prohibition of Illegal Immigrants. The requirements of Public Acts of 2006, Chapter Number 878, of the state of Tennessee, addressing the use of illegal immigrants in the performance of any Contract to supply goods or services to the state of Tennessee, shall be a material provision of this Contract, a breach of which shall be grounds for monetary and other penalties, up to and including termination of this Contract. a. The Contractor hereby attests, certifies, warrants, and assures that the Contractor shall not knowingly utilize the services of an illegal immigrant in the performance of this Contract and shall not knowingly utilize the services of any subcontractor who will utilize the services of an illegal immigrant in the performance of this Contract. The Contractor shall reaffirm this attestation, in writing, by submitting to the State a completed and signed copy of the document at Attachment 1, hereto, semi-annually during the period of this Contract. Such attestations shall be maintained by the Contractor and made available to state officials upon request. b. Prior to the use of any subcontractor in the performance of this Contract, and semi- annually thereafter, during the period of this Contract, the Contractor shall obtain and retain a current, written attestation that the subcontractor shall not knowingly utilize the services of an illegal immigrant to perform work relative to this Contract and shall not knowingly utilize the services of any subcontractor who will utilize the services of an illegal immigrant to perform work relative to this Contract. Attestations obtained from such subcontractors shall be maintained by the Contractor and made available to state officials upon request. c. The Contractor shall maintain records for all personnel used in the performance of this Contract. Said records shall be subject to review and random inspection at any reasonable time upon reasonable notice by the State. d. The Contractor understands and agrees that failure to comply with this section will be subject to the sanctions of Public Chapter 878 of 2006 for acts or omissions occurring after its effective date. This law requires the Commissioner of Finance and Administration to prohibit a contractor from contracting with, or submitting an offer, proposal, or bid to contract with the State of Tennessee to supply goods or services for a period of one year after a contractor is discovered to have knowingly used the services of illegal immigrants during the performance of this Contract. e. For purposes of this Contract, "illegal immigrant" shall be defined as any person who is not either a United States citizen, a Lawful Permanent Resident, or a person whose physical presence in the United States is authorized or allowed by the federal Department of Homeland Security and who, under federal immigration laws and/or regulations, is authorized to be employed in the U.S. or is otherwise authorized to provide services under the Contract. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 40  
  • 43. D.9. Records. The Contractor shall maintain documentation for all charges under this Contract. The books, records, and documents of the Contractor, insofar as they relate to work performed or money received under this Contract, shall be maintained for a period of three (3) full years from the date of the final payment and shall be subject to audit at any reasonable time and upon reasonable notice by the State, the Comptroller of the Treasury, or their duly appointed representatives. The financial statements shall be prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. D.10. Prevailing Wage Rates. All contracts for construction, erection, or demolition or to install goods or materials that involve the expenditure of any funds derived from the State require compliance with the prevailing wage laws as provided in Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 12-4-401 et seq.. D.11. Monitoring. The Contractor’s activities conducted and records maintained pursuant to this Contract shall be subject to monitoring and evaluation by the State, the Comptroller of the Treasury, or their duly appointed representatives. D.12. Progress Reports. The Contractor shall submit brief, periodic, progress reports to the State as requested. D.13. Strict Performance. Failure by any party to this Contract to insist in any one or more cases upon the strict performance of any of the terms, covenants, conditions, or provisions of this Contract shall not be construed as a waiver or relinquishment of any such term, covenant, condition, or provision. No term or condition of this Contract shall be held to be waived, modified, or deleted except by a written amendment signed by the parties hereto. D.14. Independent Contractor. The parties hereto, in the performance of this Contract, shall not act as employees, partners, joint venturers, or associates of one another. It is expressly acknowledged by the parties hereto that such parties are independent contracting entities and that nothing in this Contract shall be construed to create an employer/employee relationship or to allow either to exercise control or direction over the manner or method by which the other transacts its business affairs or provides its usual services. The employees or agents of one party shall not be deemed or construed to be the employees or agents of the other party for any purpose whatsoever. The Contractor, being an independent contractor and not an employee of the State, agrees to carry adequate public liability and other appropriate forms of insurance, including adequate public liability and other appropriate forms of insurance on the Contractor’s employees, and to pay all applicable taxes incident to this Contract. D.15. State Liability. The State shall have no liability except as specifically provided in this Contract. D.16. Force Majeure. The obligations of the parties to this Contract are subject to prevention by causes beyond the parties’ control that could not be avoided by the exercise of due care including, but not limited to, natural disasters, riots, wars, epidemics, or any other similar cause. D.17. State and Federal Compliance. The Contractor shall comply with all applicable State and Federal laws and regulations in the performance of this Contract. D.18. Governing Law. This Contract shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Tennessee. The Contractor agrees that it will be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of the State of Tennessee in actions that may arise under this Contract. The Contractor acknowledges and agrees that any rights or claims against the State of Tennessee or its employees hereunder, and any remedies arising therefrom, shall be subject to and limited to those rights and remedies, if any, available under Tennessee Code Annotated, Sections 9-8-101 through 9-8-407. D.19. Completeness. This Contract is complete and contains the entire understanding between the parties relating to the subject matter contained herein, including all the terms and conditions of RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 41  
  • 44. the parties’ agreement. This Contract supersedes any and all prior understandings, representations, negotiations, and agreements between the parties relating hereto, whether written or oral. D.20. Severability. If any terms and conditions of this Contract are held to be invalid or unenforceable as a matter of law, the other terms and conditions hereof shall not be affected thereby and shall remain in full force and effect. To this end, the terms and conditions of this Contract are declared severable. D.21. Headings. Section headings of this Contract are for reference purposes only and shall not be construed as part of this Contract. E. SPECIAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS: E.1. Conflicting Terms and Conditions. Should any of these special terms and conditions conflict with any other terms and conditions of this Contract, these special terms and conditions shall control. E.2. Communications and Contacts. All instructions, notices, consents, demands, or other communications required or contemplated by this Contract shall be in writing and shall be made by certified, first class mail, return receipt requested and postage prepaid, by overnight courier service with an asset tracking system, or by EMAIL or facsimile transmission with recipient confirmation. Any such communications, regardless of method of transmission, shall be addressed to the respective party at the appropriate mailing address, facsimile number, or EMAIL address as set forth below or to that of such other party or address, as may be hereafter specified by written notice. The State: Jim Snell, Executive Director Volunteer Tennessee 312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue 12th Floor, William Snodgrass TN Tower Nashville, TN 37243-1102 Jim.Snell@tn.gov Telephone # 615-253-1426 Fax # : 615 – 532-6950 The Contractor: NAME & TITLE OF CONTRACTOR CONTACT PERSON CONTRACTOR NAME ADDRESS EMAIL ADDRESS Telephone # NUMBER FAX # NUMBER All instructions, notices, consents, demands, or other communications shall be considered effectively given upon receipt or recipient confirmation as may be required. E.3. Subject to Funds Availability. The Contract is subject to the appropriation and availability of State and/or Federal funds. In the event that the funds are not appropriated or are otherwise unavailable, the State reserves the right to terminate the Contract upon written notice to the Contractor. Said termination shall not be deemed a breach of Contract by the State. Upon receipt of the written notice, the Contractor shall cease all work associated with the Contract. Should such an event occur, the Contractor shall be entitled to compensation for all satisfactory and authorized services completed as of the termination date. Upon such termination, the Contractor shall have no right to recover from the State any actual, general, special, incidental, consequential, or any other damages whatsoever of any description or amount. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 42  
  • 45. E.4. Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System. The Contractor acknowledges and understands that, subject to statutory exceptions contained in Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 8-36-801, et. seq., the law governing the Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System (TCRS), provides that if a retired member of TCRS, or of any superseded system administered by TCRS, or of any local retirement fund established pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated, Title 8, Chapter 35, Part 3 accepts state employment, the member's retirement allowance is suspended during the period of the employment. Accordingly and notwithstanding any provision of this Contract to the contrary, the Contractor agrees that if it is later determined that the true nature of the working relationship between the Contractor and the State under this Contract is that of “employee/employer” and not that of an independent contractor, the Contractor may be required to repay to TCRS the amount of retirement benefits the Contractor received from TCRS during the period of this Contract. E.5. Voluntary Buyout Program. The Contractor acknowledges and understands that, for a period of two years beginning August 16, 2008, restrictions are imposed on former state employees who received a State of Tennessee Voluntary Buyout Program (VBP) severance payment with regard to contracts with state agencies that participated in the VBP. a. The State will not contract with either a former state employee who received a VBP severance payment or an entity in which a former state employee who received a VBP severance payment or the spouse of such an individual holds a controlling financial interest. b. The State may contract with an entity with which a former state employee who received a VBP severance payment is an employee or an independent contractor. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Contractor understands and agrees that there may be unique business circumstances under which a return to work by a former state employee who received a VBP severance payment as an employee or an independent contractor of a State contractor would not be appropriate, and in such cases the State may refuse Contractor personnel. Inasmuch, it shall be the responsibility of the State to review Contractor personnel to identify any such issues. c. With reference to either subsection a. or b. above, a contractor may submit a written request for a waiver of the VBP restrictions regarding a former state employee and a contract with a state agency that participated in the VBP. Any such request must be submitted to the State in the form of the VBP Contracting Restriction Waiver Request format available from the State and the Internet at: www.state.tn.us/finance/rds/ocr/waiver.html. The determination on such a request shall be at the sole discretion of the head of the state agency that is a Party to this Contract, the Commissioner of Finance and Administration, and the Commissioner of Human Resources. E.6. Incorporation of Additional Documents. Included in this Contract by reference are the following documents: a. The Contract document and its attachments b. All Clarifications and addenda made to the Contractor’s Proposal c. The Request for Proposal and its associated amendments d. Technical Specifications provided to the Contractor e. The Contractor’s Proposal In the event of a discrepancy or ambiguity regarding the Contractor’s duties, responsibilities, and RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 43  
  • 46. performance under this Contract, these documents shall govern in order of precedence detailed above. E.7. Contractor Commitment to Diversity. The Contractor shall comply with and make reasonable business efforts to exceed the commitment to diversity represented by the Contractor’s proposal responding to RFP-31701-11070 (Attachment 6.2, B.15) and resulting in this Contract. The Contractor shall assist the State in monitoring the Contractor’s performance of this commitment by providing, as requested, a quarterly report of participation in the performance of this Contract by small business enterprises and businesses owned by minorities, women, and persons with a disability. Such reports shall be provided to the state of Tennessee Governor’s Office of Business Diversity Enterprise in form and substance as required by said office. E.8 Confidentiality of Records. Strict standards of confidentiality of records shall be maintained in accordance with the law. All material and information, regardless of form, medium or method of communication, provided to the Contractor by the State or acquired by the Contractor on behalf of the State shall be regarded as confidential information in accordance with the provisions of State law and ethical standards and shall not be disclosed, and all necessary steps shall be taken by the Contractor to safeguard the confidentiality of such material or information in conformance with State law and ethical standards. The Contractor will be deemed to have satisfied its obligations under this section by exercising the same level of care to preserve the confidentiality of the State’s information as the Contractor exercises to protect its own confidential information so long as such standard of care does not violate the applicable provisions of the first paragraph of this section. The Contractor’s obligations under this section do not apply to information in the public domain; entering the public domain but not from a breach by the Contractor of this Contract; previously possessed by the Contractor without written obligations to the State to protect it; acquired by the Contractor without written restrictions against disclosure from a third party which, to the Contractor’s knowledge, is free to disclose the information; independently developed by the Contractor without the use of the State’s information; or, disclosed by the State to others without restrictions against disclosure. It is expressly understood and agreed the obligations set forth in this section shall survive the termination of this Contract. E.9. Printing Authorization. The Contractor agrees that no publication coming within the jurisdiction of Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 12-7-101, et. seq., shall be printed unless a printing authorization number has been obtained and affixed as required by Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 12-7-103 (d). E. 10. State Ownership of Work Products. The State shall have ownership, right, title, and interest, including ownership of copyright, in all work products, including computer source code, created, designed, developed, derived, documented, installed, or delivered under this Contract subject to the next subsection and full and final payment for each “Work Product.” The State shall have royalty-free and unlimited rights and license to use, disclose, reproduce, publish, distribute, modify, maintain, or create derivative works from, for any purpose whatsoever, all said Work Products. a. To the extent that the Contractor uses any of its pre-existing, proprietary or independently developed tools, materials or information ("Contractor Materials"), the Contractor shall retain all right, title and interest in and to such Contractor Materials, and the State shall acquire no right, title or interest in or to such Contractor Materials EXCEPT the Contractor grants to the State an unlimited, non-transferable license to use, copy and distribute internally, solely for the State's internal purposes, any Contractor Materials reasonably associated with any Work Product provided under the Contract. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 44  
  • 47. b. The Contractor shall furnish such information and data as the State may request, including but not limited to computer code, that is applicable, essential, fundamental, or intrinsic to any Work Product and Contractor Materials reasonably associated with any Work Product, in accordance with this Contract and applicable state law. c. Nothing in this Contract shall prohibit the Contractor's use for its own purposes of the general knowledge, skills, experience, ideas, concepts, know-how, and techniques obtained and used during the course of providing the services requested under this Contract. d. Nothing in the Contract shall prohibit the Contractor from developing for itself, or for others, materials which are similar to and/or competitive with those that are produced under this Contract. E.11. Prohibited Advertising. The Contractor shall not refer to this Contract or the Contractor’s relationship with the State hereunder in commercial advertising in such a manner as to state or imply that the Contractor or the Contractor's services are endorsed. It is expressly understood and agreed that the obligations set forth in this section shall survive the termination of this Contract in perpetuity. E.12. Lobbying. The Contractor certifies, to the best of its knowledge and belief, that: a. No federally appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of an agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement. b. If any funds other than federally appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement, the Contractor shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, ``Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,'' in accordance with its instructions. c. The Contractor shall require that the language of this certification be included in the award documents for all sub-awards at all tiers (including subcontracts, sub-grants, and contracts under grants, loans, and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose accordingly. This certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed when this transaction was made or entered into and is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, CONTRACTOR LEGAL ENTITY NAME: CONTRACTOR SIGNATURE DATE RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 45  
  • 48. PRINTED NAME AND TITLE OF CONTRACTOR SIGNATORY (above) DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION: M.D.GOETZ, JR., COMMISSIONER DATE RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 46  
  • 49. ATTACHMENT 1 ATTESTATION RE PERSONNEL USED IN CONTRACT PERFORMANCE SUBJECT CONTRACT NUMBER: CONTRACTOR LEGAL ENTITY NAME: FEDERAL EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: (or Social Security Number) The Contractor, identified above, does hereby attest, certify, warrant, and assure that the Contractor shall not knowingly utilize the services of an illegal immigrant in the performance of this Contract and shall not knowingly utilize the services of any subcontractor who will utilize the services of an illegal immigrant in the performance of this Contract. CONTRACTOR SIGNATURE NOTICE: This attestation MUST be signed by an individual empowered to contractually bind the Contractor. If said individual is not the chief executive or president, this document shall attach evidence showing the individual’s authority to contractually bind the Contractor. PRINTED NAME AND TITLE OF SIGNATORY DATE OF ATTESTATION
  • 50. ATTACHMENT 2 YOUTH ASSET SURVEY The Youth Asset Survey is intended to ask about your participation in school activities and to get important information about what you think and feel about these activities. It will take about 10 minutes to complete. Your answers on this questionnaire will be kept strictly confidential. Do not put your name on this form. The Leadership Class will receive a report that combines all answers together. No one will be able to connect your answers with your name. Your answers will make a difference! In some of the questions, we will ask you about your experience at school in general. In other questions, we will ask you about your experience in the Leadership Class. IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS YOU MAY USE A PENCIL OR A PEN. MARK ONLY ONE ANSWER PER QUESTION UNLESS  INSTRUCTED OTHERWISE. Thank you for your help! ABOUT YOU 1. How old are you? 11 or younger 15 12 16 13 17 14 18 2. Are you male or female? male female 3. Which best describes you? Please mark only one. American Indian White or Caucasian Hispanic, Latino or Latina Black or African American Asian or Pacific Islander Multiracial 4. Which of the following best describes your family? I live with two parents. I live in a one-parent family with my mother. I live in a one-parent family with my father. Sometimes I live with my mother and sometimes with my father. I live with another guardian, relative, or person(s) other than my parents. I don’t know 5. Do you get free or reduced price lunch at school? Yes No I don’t know RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 48  
  • 51. 6. Please answer the following for the Leadership Development Class you are in today. How much do you agree or disagree with each of the following? Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree A. The class has been fun B. The class has been interesting C. The class has been challenging Now think about all the time you spend in school activities. 7. During the last six months, about how many hours a week did you spend in school extra curricular or leadership development activities? None 1 2 3 4 More than 5 8. Have you ever been involved in any of these types of extra curricular programs or activities in the last year? A. Sports Yes NO B. Leadership and service clubs or programs Yes NO C. Mentoring Yes NO D. Tutoring Yes NO E. Other after school programs Yes NO F. Youth employment or job readiness Yes NO G. Special events Yes NO H. Other activities Yes NO Please tell us how much you agree or disagree with the following statements. 9. Overall, how good a job has school programs and activities done in helping you learn more about yourself and your strengths? Excellent Good Fair Poor 10. Overall, how good a job has the Leadership Development Class done in helping you learn more about yourself and your strengths? Excellent Good Fair Poor 11. How much are your parents or guardians involved in your school activities? Not at all a little involved very involved ABOUT HOW LEADERSHIP CLASS ACTIVITIES HELP RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 49  
  • 52. We want to know if the Leadership Class has helped you learn or feel differently about what you do. How much do you agree or disagree with the following? Leadership Class activities have helped me… Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree 1. Make better decisions 2. Get along with others 3. Make and keep friends 4. Do what is right 5. Deal with people who are being mean 6. Learn to be a leader 7. Be better team player 8. Stay away from drugs 10. Stay out of trouble 11. Feel good about myself 12. Have a lot to be proud of 13. Get better sense of what I can do 14. Learn that what I do makes a differenc 15. Learn I can do things I didn’t think I could 16. Feel successful in the activities I have been part of How much do you agree or disagree with each of the following? Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree 17. Teachers and staff at school try to teach me the difference between right and wrong 18. In Leadership Class activities, I’ve learned it’s important to help other people 19. Being in Leadership Class activities makes me want to learn more 20. Staff and teachers at school expect me to respect others 21. Participation in Leadership Class activities has made me want to try harder in school 22. School staff and teachers expect me to help out in some way by setting up, cleaning up or being in charge of things 23. School staff and teachers encourage me to do well in school Since you have been coming to Leadership Class, have the following become more or less important to you? Much more important More important Less important Much less important 24. Caring about other people RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 50  
  • 53. 25. Think that everyone can contribute 26. Treating all people fairly 27. Standing up for what I believe 28. Caring about other people 29. Being responsible for what I do 30. Understanding and caring about other people’s feelings ABOUT PEOPLE We would like to ask you about adults at your school and those involved in the Leadership Development Class activities. These include staff, teachers and volunteer speakers as well as other adults you have contact with through the school. How much do you agree or disagree with each of the following? Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree 1. Teachers and staff really care about me 2. Teachers and staff make me feel important 3. I could ask staff and teachers if I had a serious problem 4. I really like the teachers and adults involved in the Leadership Class activities and events 5. I am given a chance to help others 6. Teachers and staff understand me 7. Staff and teachers listen to what I have to say 8. I get to help plan, or lead activities 9. Teachers and staff challenge me to do my best 10. I feel safe at school 11. Other students care about me 12. Teachers and staff make me feel like I can make a difference 13. Other adults who hang out here care about me 14. People make me feel like I belong 15. In Leadership Class activities, I do things to help out 16. In Leadership Class activities, adults expect the best from me 17. Compared to other places I spend time (like the Neighborhood or home), when I am at school, I feel safer Just as safe Less safe ABOUT LEADERSHIP CLASS ACTIVITIES RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 51  
  • 54. Now we want to ask you more questions about school programs and activities. How much do you agree or disagree with each of the following? Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree 18. I am expected to try hard and do my best 19. There are clear rules about what we can do 20. If I break one of the rules, I usually hear about it Among your friends from school, how many would you say: None A few Some Most Almost All 21. Do well in school? 22. Drink alcohol once a week or more? 23. Care about others? 24. Get into trouble at school? RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 52  
  • 55. RFP ATTACHMENT 6.7. APPROVED LEARN AND SERVE AMERICA PROGRAM NARRATIVES 2009-2012 Tennessee Learn and Serve America School-based Grant application Narrative 1. Executive Summary The 2009 School-based Learn and Serve grant will be implemented by the Tennessee Department of Education in collaboration with Volunteer Tennessee. Subgrantees will be selected to provide high quality service-learning projects as a dropout prevention strategy, incorporating the K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice. Approximately six school districts in Tennessee will be awarded subgrants for programs that include district-wide implementation across the three grade spans. Subgrantees must also have a strong, written community partnership and must include strategies to increase students’ civic engagement. The subgrantees will achieve the following goals: (1) engage, annually, 6000 primarily at-risk youth in 6 school districts in high quality service learning programs aimed at increasing civic engagement (2) expand the number of schools/teachers using service-learning through teacher training in partnership with the Tennessee Lions Clubs and through subgranting activities. By the end of year 3 an additional 500 Tennessee teachers will be trained through Lions Quest Skills for Action, Skills for Adolescence, and Skills for Growing curriculums or through the Department of Education’s Service-Learning 101 training. (3) develop service- learning projects addressing local community needs resulting in healthy communities. By the end of three years, students participating in Tennessee's school-based Learn and Serve programs will have developed 90 new service-learning projects aligned with the Tenneseee State standards using the K-12 Service-Learning Standards of Quality Practice. These service- learning project lesson plans will be submitted to SLICE and available through the National Service-Learning Clearinghouse for educators across the country to use. Subgrantees will also plan service-learning projects related to Health and Nutrition during the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday. 2. Three Year Plan The Learn and Serve school-based grant is housed in the Teaching and Learning division of the TN Department of Education (TDOE). In the past, TDOE has contracted with Volunteer Tennessee (the state service commission) to provide the training and technical assistance to the subgrantees and to other teachers across the state. This has included service-learning RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 53
  • 56. trainings throughout the year, two annual subgrantee trainings, site visits, reporting, and conference and meeting presentations. For the 2009-2012 grant, the TDOE will be contracting with Volunteer Tennessee to continue its training and technical assistance management. Additional funds will also be contracted so that Volunteer Tennessee can manage the financial contracts of the subgrantee school districts. As a result of the economy, the TDOE staff is at capacity and feels that service-learning can thrive more for the next three years if it is managed by Volunteer Tennessee. This transition of additional duties should prove seamless not only because the partnership between these two state agencies has existed for 15 years, but also because Volunteer Tennessee has past experience managing 3 community-based Learn and Serve America grants. Key tasks and dates for the program: YEAR 1 May 2009 Release RFP for school districts June 2009 Grant award received by TDOE via eGrants July 2009 TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting Selection of subgrantee school sites September 2009 Subgrantee launch training Program implementation and pre-tests Learn and Serve Challenge Week November 2009 TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting Year-round Regional two-day practitioner trainings through Lions-Quest Technical assistance, monitoring, and board member site visits January 18, 2010 MLK Day of Service activities January 31, 2010 FFR due January 2010 MLK project reports due Mid year financial reports due February 2010 TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting April 2010 Survey to all TN school districts on service-learning participation Statewide Service-Learning Conference Subgrantee grant continuation requests released May 2010 Post-tests Subgrantee grant continuation requests due TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting June 30, 2010 LASSIE reports due LSA Continuation application due July 31, 2010 FFR report due Award subgrantee grant continuations Year 1 evaluation report due YEAR 2 September 2010 Subgrantee Institute training Program implementation and pre-tests Learn and Serve Challenge Week TN Service-Learning Advisory Council Meeting Year-round Regional two-day practitioner trainings through Lions-Quest RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 54
  • 57. Technical assistance, monitoring and board member site visits December 2010 TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting January 17, 2011 MLK Day of Service activities January 31, 2011 FFR due January 2011 MLK project reports due Mid year financial reports due March 2011 TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting April 2011 Survey to all TN school districts on service-learning participation Statewide Service-Learning Conference Subgrantee grant continuation requests released May 2011 Post-tests Subgrantee grant continuation requests due TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting June 30, 2011 LASSIE reports due LSA Continuation application due July 31, 2011 FFR report due Award subgrantee grant continuations Year 2 evaluation report due YEAR 3 September 2011 Subgrantee Institute training Program implementation and pre-tests Learn and Serve Challenge Week TN Service-Learning Advisory Council Meeting Year-round Regional two-day practitioner trainings through Lions-Quest Technical assistance, monitoring, and board member site visits December 2011 TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting January 16, 2012 MLK Day of Service activities January 31, 2012 FFR due January 2012 MLK project reports due Mid year financial reports due February 2012 Day on the Hill March 2012 TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting April 2012 Survey to all TN school districts on service-learning participation Statewide Service-Learning Conference May 2012 Post-tests TN Service-Learning Advisory Council meeting June 30, 2012 LASSIE reports due July 31, 2012 FFR report due Final report, including Year 3 evaluation Service-learning in Tennessee will naturally expand with the new district-wide implementation of the 2009-2012 Learn and Serve America grant, as opposed to school-wide and classroom implementation in the past. As the requirement for senior capstone experiences (with service- learning as an option for that experience) approaches, service-learning will also expand. The State Board of Education is in the process of approving a new Service-Learning 101 training that will be inexpensive, thorough, and can reach large numbers of teachers. We expect that RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 55
  • 58. the implementation of this new training will result in expansion. Other partnerships that are developing that will result in service-learning infusion are as follows: TN Arts Commission(arts education programs), TN Campus Compact (College of Education programs), TN Diploma Project (strategy for all high schools to offer workforce readiness skills), Tennessee Inclusion Project (programs for individuals with developmental disabilities), Tennessee Lottery for Afterschool Programs and 21st Century Community Learning Centers (afterschool programs), and CCR&R (daycare programs). The first annual Statewide Service-Learning Conference will allow us to reach beyond these partnerships and meet new organizations and educators interested in service-learning. We are excited to see the doors that might open for service-learning expansion. The TDOE expects to subgrant to six school districts. Subgrants can total $220,000 and will be awarded based on the size of the district. 0-10,000 students=$20,000, 10,000-50,000 students=$30,000, 50,000 and larger=$40,000+. Subgrantees will be competing, and applications will be reviewed by the TN Service-Learning Advisory Council, Volunteer Tennessee staff, TDOE staff, Volunteer TN board members, and other volunteers with service- learning experience. These subgrants will be three year grants, contingent upon completion of the previous year’s program requirements and a satisfactory continuation request application for the next program year. 3. Participant Development Civic Engagement: Intellectual and participatory skills that are prerequisites to an engaged citizenry are embedded in this service-learning model. Students learn to listen and question as they work cooperatively in small groups, and they are taught how to manage conflicts. Service- learning students will be guided by their teachers in structured reflection activities that emphasize that the identification, analysis and debating skills they used to research and brainstorm ideas about the service-learning project or to reflect on the connection to school content should be expanded to think of the state, country or world affairs consequences. Students will be encouraged to describe and identify the public and/or governmental context to the social issues. Teachers in the annual Service-Learning Institute training and Statewide Service-Learning Conference will be given examples of reflection activities that would help students explain the political processes involved in social action. Civic dispositions are the character and traits that emerge from students after learning from experiences and reflecting on values. Students are taught in service-learning to respect human dignity and to behave in humane ways as they interact with beneficiaries, just as they RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 56
  • 59. themselves would like to be treated. A key lesson taught in the TN service-learning experience is that each person must bear responsibility for actions, and the habits of being responsible pay off in gains for the group and community. The attitude changes on the student survey of service-learning students in TN shows that significant learning occurs on personal responsibility and that students change values about how friendly peers are, if teachers care about them and whether they can make a difference in school. The end result of education students in civic knowledge, intellectual and participatory skills and civic disposition is the outcome of civic efficacy--the feeling that you are powerful enough to engage in political and social issues in your community. Students involved in Tennessee’s Learn and Serve grant will also be required to develop legislative education tools and understand the process of informing their local, state, and national elected representatives about the impact they are making in their communities. The end of the three year grant will culminate with a Day on the Hill for the Learn and Serve students to showcase their projects for their legislators. Disadvantaged Youth: In 2005-2006, 53% of TN students met criteria to be identified as economically disadvantaged, according to reports on students qualifying for free and reduced lunches. Harvard University Civil Rights Project research shows that poor, racially isolated Whites have low graduation rates that are nearly identical to poor, racially isolated Blacks. Nationally, few predominantly White schools have concentrated poverty, but there are significant numbers of these in parts of the rural South (including Tennessee). In 2008, the Kids Count report found that TN ranked 42nd among states with children living in poverty. Subgrantee applicants will be required to demonstrate how disadvantaged youth in their communities will be engaged in service-learning projects. Informational calls/meetings about the subgrantee grant applicants/RFPs will be advertised heavily in the 10 school districts with the highest dropout rates and the largest number of students receiving free and reduced lunches. The Independent Schools Association will also be invited to participate in all service-learning trainings, resulting in partnerships opportunities for private and public schools. The Statewide Service-Learning Conference will also attract educators and students from schools with differing economic needs. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 57
  • 60. Training and Technical Assistance: Service-Learning trainings in Tennessee will focus on the K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice. Through a grant with the Lions Clubs International Foundation, Tennessee teachers are able to attend Lions Quest service-learning workshops throughout the year. Lions Quest programs include a first step of teachers guiding students through a community needs assessment and project planning process. Youth voice is vital to service-learning. Students are led through community needs assessment research process of identifying, analyzing, and ranking the problems or issues that could be addressed by a service-learning project. This method allows for student ownership of the project selected, but the cognitive skills learned emphasize problem-solving methods, hypothesis testing of ideas, and learning to work effectively in peer groups. The teachers submitting the subgrantee ideas craft them from these student suggestions. Subgrantees will be required to turn in service-learning project summaries at the end of each year linking their projects with the 8 standards of quality practice. Teachers will be given the Linking Service-Learning to Tennessee Standards guides, created by a former Learn and Serve educator, that connect service-learning project ideas with TN state academic standards. The annual Learn and Serve Institute will provide subgrantee teachers with the opportunity to improve their standards of quality practice. Sessions will include topics on reflection and youth voice (led by the Center for Asset Development), partnerships (led by the Center for Nonprofit Management), and diversity (led by Tennessee Inclusion Team members). Subgrantee teachers will also meet annually with a program evaluator to help guide them in the process of pre-and post testing their students. Desk top monitoring tools and staff and board member site visits will be used to help subgrantees monitor and track their success. Each subgrantee will also be required to ensure that participants are involved in service-learning for at least 30 hours each semester. The Service-Learning Institute will also provide a time for subgrantees to learn about Health and Nutrition initiatives so that they can guide their students in meeting needs related to this topic during the MLK Day of Service. High schools involved in the Learn and Serve program will be offered the chance to send a team of 8-10 students for service-learning leadership development through the state Aspire RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 58
  • 61. program. This program offers and intensive 3 day training for youth leaders across the state who are working to change the climate in their schools through service-learning. In the spring of each year, the Department of Education and Volunteer Tennessee will sponsor a Statewide Service-Learning Conference. The first annual conference will be in 2010. This conference will provide the opportunity for service-learning practitioners across the state to come to one event and share their best practices. Students will manage a youth track and Campus Compact will be offered a higher education track to organize. Early discussions have included using this conference as a time to link service-learning into specific subject areas such as scheduling a pre-conference session led by the Tennessee Arts Commission. We are excited about the possibilities that this statewide conference holds and are looking forward to working with our Service-Learning Advisory Council to plan it. 4. Community Needs and Services Activities Tennessee ranks 13th in the country for households experiencing food insecurity and hunger. Food insecurity is defined as the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods. Children who are in food insecure households are at risk of inefficient nutrition which can put them in jeopardy of developmental risk, can affect their cognitive and behavioral development, and can put them at risk for illness and weakened immune systems. Children from insecure households are also likely to be behind in their academic development compared to other children. Although the majority of Tennesseans are food secure, they are not necessarily healthy. Tennessee has the 4th highest obesity ranking with 64% of adult Tennesseans being overweight or obese, and 8% of children being overweight. Obesity is the number two risk factor for cardiovascular disease and also correlates strongly with increased risks of diabetes, cancers and other debilitating chronic conditions. In addition, it has the potential to reverse progress made in other health and development indicators, such as life expectancy at birth. Health care systems in Tennessee struggle to meet the demands of our increasing health care needs. These two examples show that Tennesseans need more health and nutrition education and experiences. All schools in Tennessee have recently developed a Coordinated School Health Program to address these health and nutrition issues. Each school district also has in place a RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 59
  • 62. School Health Advisory Council. The 2009-2012 Learn and Serve America subgrantee programs will partner with their Coordinated School Health Programs and School Health Advisory Councils to plan and implement service-learning projects related to health and nutrition. These projects can focus on access to food such as hunger and homelessness issues, food desserts, school food programs, and community gardens. They also can focus on making the food that is available healthier, such as nutrition classes, school nutrition programs, organic community gardens, and farm to school programs. Programs may also choose to focus on overall good health by planning health fairs and developing physical education programs at schools and in senior centers. Subgrantee programs will be able to look at their specific communities and decide what their biggest issues are related to health and nutrition. 5. Strengthening Communities This next three year Learn and Serve grant is designed to institutionalize service-learning across the state. Our goal in Tennessee is to have every student experience service-learning in each of the grade spans. In the past, Tennessee has subgranted to individual schools but has not seen much growth of service-learning beyond those schools. We have also seen service-learning confined to a stand alone classroom. For this next grant cycle, we will only fund district-wide programs. Each district will be required to pay a salary or stipend for a service-learning coordinator. Presentations to faculty and school boards by teachers and service-learning students will be part of the grant requirements. Districts will be responsible each year for increasing the number of teachers who have been trained in service-learning, developing a mini grant system for specific projects in the district, identifying lead teachers in the district to serve as mentors, participating in legislative education, attending two statewide service-learning trainings, and nominating students for the President’s Volunteer Service Awards and the Tennessee Governor’s Stars Volunteer Awards. All of these grant guidelines will lead to institutionalization of service-learning. The Department of Education and Volunteer Tennessee will also be working on state level policy. Currently, the State Board of Education is in the process of approving a new Service- Learning 101 training that will allow an inexpensive but thorough way of training teachers in service-learning. The school board also recently approved the option of service-learning for senior capstone projects that are required for high school graduation. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 60
  • 63. Partnerships are brewing with the Tennessee Diploma Project and the Tennessee Scholars program to include service-learning as a strategy within these projects. The Tennessee Inclusion Team has been working to infuse service-learning into special education programs across the state, and career and technical education programs currently include service- learning training. The Tennessee Arts Commission will be including service-learning training for their Artists in Residency programs. Service-learning trainings will continue to be advertised among the state AmeriCorps programs, where some members even use service-learning as the teaching methodology in their classrooms. Campus Compact in Tennessee was launched in March 2008 and has proven to be a strong partner for the Department of Education and Volunteer Tennessee. A staff member from Volunteer Tennessee serves on the Advisory Council for Campus Compact and had forged strong higher ed partnerships. In 2009, service-learning trainings will be held on three college campuses to encourage attendance by College of Education students. Currently, Learn and Serve subgrantees are participating in planning sessions for the state’s next 2010-2013 Unified State Plan for Service. At the National Service-Learning Conference, participants from across the state of Tennessee will give input in a session led by Service- Learning Advisory Council and Volunteer Tennessee board member Dr. Mike McCullough. Input will also be sought from the 2009-2012 Learn and Serve subgrantees at their first gathering in the fall of 2009. Each Learn and Serve subgrantee school district will be required to form a formal partnership with a community organization prior to applying for Learn and Serve funds. This organization’s mission should match the needs of the community identified by the students. At the first meeting with the subgrantees, in the fall of 2009, a session will be held about community partnerships and collaboration, led by the Center for Nonprofit Management. During this session, subgrantees will go through a process of identifying their partnership needs for the service-learning projects. Memos of Understanding will be drafted so that each entity in the partnership will have clear roles in the collaboration. Throughout the school year, students will be able to use this community partner for information, community mapping, or service experiences. At the end of the year, the partner will be surveyed to find out if it was a beneficial relationship for them. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 61
  • 64. Volunteer Tennessee and the Department of Education have a strong partnership with the Lions Clubs of Tennessee through their grant for Lions Quest trainings. This also provides a unique opportunity for numerous adult volunteers. Lions Club members are active volunteers interested in serving side by side with students committed to improving their communities. With our diverse subgrantee site locations, we will strive to recruit approximately 10 volunteers per site totaling 60 adult volunteers. Adult volunteers can also be expected from other local partnerships such as law enforcement agencies, non-profit organizations, and faith-based organizations committed to youth violence prevention. And as always, teachers and parents will provide additional adult support. 6. Organizational Capacity a. Program/Fiscal Oversight. TDOE successfully administers a multitude of federal, state and local grant programs. Annually, the Department receives a compliance audit and a state audit completed by the independent Office of the State Comptroller. In addition to a professional accounting division, the department has an audit division to review and/or investigate specific complaints. All school systems, therefore, all subgrantees, meet the requirements of OMB circular A133, annual financial compliance audit. In the majority of school systems the compliance audit is completed by the State’s Division of County Audit. The remaining school systems contract with private, professional CPAs to complete the compliance audit. TDOE fiscal consultants are available to all subgrantees for assistance in fiscal review and accounting procedures. Program content is monitored through desk review of reports, review of program presentations and random site visits. Volunteer Tennessee staff and board members also conduct annual programmatic site visits and at least one financial monitoring visit per subgrantee. TDOE has successfully administered the Learn and Serve America formula grant since its inception. In FY 2008, the department administered approximately $856 million in federal grants. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 62
  • 65. b. Staff Roles and Experience. TN Department of Education Dr. Tim Webb, Commissioner of Education; Connie Smith, Assistant Commissioner of Teaching and Learning; Nicole Cobb, Director of School Counseling and Learn and Serve America coordinator—three years experience coordinating the Learn and Serve program, Jim Jones, Fiscal Director; Amy Sharp, Director of Accounting Services. Volunteer Tennessee. Jim Snell, Executive Director; Meredith Freeman, Deputy Director, coordinates statewide training, evaluation, Lions partnership, LSA subgranting process, financial oversight of LSA subgrantees, LSA programmatic site visits—7 years service-learning experience in training and technical assistance and Learn and Serve America program oversight.; Melia Arnold, Aspire Director, responsible for training and program support for Aspire youth leadership program. Independent contactor for Learn and Serve participant performance evaluation c. Evaluation Plan--The Tennessee Department of Education will administer the School-based Learn and Serve grant and will work with Volunteer Tennessee to supervise the compliance of the vendor contract with the outside evaluator. For the last grant the independent contractor for Learn and Serve participant performance evaluation was Dr. Molly Laird, President of The Evaluation Team. Dr. Laird has 28 years of program evaluation experience working with state agencies, universities (Cornell and Syracuse Universities), as well as for United Way and prevention organizations. In the 1990’s Dr, Laird worked as a senior researcher and then Director of Research for Quest International. Her relationship with personnel from the state of Tennessee dates from 1996. A competitive RFP process will occur at Volunteer Tennessee to select the evaluator for the 2009-2012 LSA program. The evaluator’s role on this project will involve training teachers to RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 63
  • 66. use the selected pre and post surveys, and training teachers on how to select control groups. The evaluation tool will assess the program participants and community partners on information related to the performance measures such as reporting hours of service given to each project, the number of students involved in service, the cumulative hours, and the number of students who completed or exceeded the Tennessee minimum standard for high quality involvement of 30 hrs per semester, etc. Technical assistance, especially to teachers new to service-learning, would be needed in year one of the proposed project. Phone calls and e-mails often would be made from the evaluator to each site. This contact would be at least twice a year to help teachers implement the program and administer the research tools. To give further assistance, the evaluator attends any conference held for the subgrantees. Volunteer Tennessee expects to contract with an evaluator who can make all surveys available electronically and who can compile the data electronically. This will allow for more of the evaluator’s time to be spent on end of the year reports that are reader-friendly and can be used across the state to increase knowledge of service-learning programs and the impacts they make for students. The evaluator will also be responsible for developing an online service-learning training tool for teachers across the state to use. Finally, Volunteer Tennessee hopes to join with other states (they have already been in discussions with Indiana and Kentucky) to create a multi-state evaluation report. 7. Budget/Cost Effectiveness Service-learning is a cost-effective intervention for disadvantaged youth, and this program is cost-effective in comparison to others you may consider. The TN Department of Education follows standard state salary, procurement and travel regulations to keep costs low. TN salaries are below comparable levels in other states and mileage reimbursement rates always lag the IRS. The department and its partners seek community support through donated space for trainings, shared rooms in trainings and support from local Lions clubs for training refreshments. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 64
  • 67. This program will leverage $220,000 annually in dollar for dollar local match, primarily in form of subgrantee teacher time. The SEA will match this grant with up to $1000,000 annually in Title IV Safe and Drug Free Schools funds allocated for service-learning activities. The Lions Clubs International Foundation will match this grant with $51,190 to cover the cost of 8 Lions- Quest trainings. Institutional support for the program through professional accounting, auditing, monitoring, human resource, media relations and legal resources will continue to support Learn and Serve America. This investment will yield dividends through replicability. First, the program itself is cost- effective because it builds on the service-learning subgranting model successfully implemented in past years. TN builds on the national service-learning training through Lions-Quest International, recognized as highly effective by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) and Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL). TN builds on the established regional teacher training system supported in part by the Lions Clubs International Foundation and local Lions Clubs. TN requires electronic evaluation and data compilation to lower the cost and improve upon the evaluation process. Tennessee also plans to purse financial partnerships during this grant with the Tennessee Arts Commission and the Center for Asset Development to expand service-learning across the state. In the effort to strengthen national understanding of Learn and Serve America, the Department of Education plans a two prong strategy. First, subgrantees and service-learning participants will be encouraged to use the Learn and Serve America logo and will be required to participate in King holiday service activities. They will be asked to collect great stories both for federal reports and for Lions Club International publications and local dissemination. Second, the Department will again partner with state service commission members to make high profile site visits to service-learning programs, bringing along top officials and media. The communications committee of the commission will continue its work to publicize outstanding local stories. The strategic partnerships committee will continue to push for strategic outreach to key stakeholders. A full commission initiative related to volunteer recognition occurs annually and is attached to the Governors office and recognition of Learn and Serve programs is an important component. For the next three year grant, subgrantees will be required to communicate with their local and state elected officials to educate them about their service- learning and Learn and Serve America programs. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 65
  • 68. The TN Department of Education seeks to use service-learning district-wide grants. This will ensure that service-learning is being institutionalized on every level, and the Statewide Service-Learning conference will ensure that organizations across the state of Tennessee know about Learn and Serve America. Performance Measures Measure Category: Participant Development Output: 9,000 K-12 students in Tennessee will participate in service-learning activities. Intermediate Outcome: 30% of K-12 students participating in service-learning will show an increase in civic engagement through pre-post test evaluation surveys. End Outcome: 40% of the K-12 students participating in this grant will enter careers in public service. Measure Category: Needs and Service Activities Output: Six new LEA service-learning projects will be developed each year addressing health and nutrition. Intermediate Outcome: 80% of health and nutrition project partners will agree that service- learners helped raise awareness about health and nutrition and/or contributed to healthier and more nutritious communities. End Outcome: 80% of community members will indicate that they feel the community is healthier and will advocate for nutritious and healthy opportunities for every community member. Measure Category: Strengthening Communities Output: Each subgrantee will partner with at least three community partners, as evidenced by Memos of Understanding. Intermediate Outcome: 80% of partners will agree that collaborating with an LEA through service-learning has helped them carry out their mission. End Outcome: Schools and partners will develop mutually beneficial long term relationships. 2009-2011 TN Learn and Serve America Community-based application narrative Narratives Executive Summary RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 66
  • 69. In a 2006 address, TN Gov. Phil Bredesen challenged leaders to raise the state's graduation rate from a dismal 66% to 90% by 2012 -- a formidable task that hasn't been clearly addressed in half the given time. As the state's service commission, Volunteer Tennessee (VT) has proven that SL is key to ensuring that TN students stay in school and is the ideal agency to lead the governor's charge. Through the TN Seasons of Service LSA grant, VT proposes to mobilize 3 of TN's largest youth organizations--BRIDGESPeaceJam, 4-H, and YMCA -- to engage 11,150 students in out of school service programs during spring, summer, fall, and winter breaks to effectively turn the tides against school attrition. High and middle school-aged students will lead younger students through SL activities, with the goal of extending these initiatives to all partner affiliates across TN and nationwide. This grant will create a replicable out of school SL framework that will fit within the structures of the 3 partners so that they can be institutionalized nationwide, with the potential to reach 16 million youth that are involved in 4-H, YMCA, and BRIDGES-PeaceJam nationally. A more skeletal framework will be available so that all non-profits worldwide can adapt it to fit their own models. Program partners/subgrantees have been strategically selected because of the high dropout rates in their city headquarters, their ability to impact 80,000 youth statewide from rural and urban areas, high quality of programming and their national presence. BRIDGES-PeaceJam is a collaboration between BRIDGES (one of the largest youth organizations in Memphis) and the International PeaceJam Foundation. BRIDGES-PeaceJam will create a yearlong Leadership Institute in Memphis which combines a week-long summer camp, an MLK Day event, and a spring break filled with service. TN 4-H will create SL camps during the summer and spring/fall breaks for both urban and rural youth. These camps will pair younger 4-H members with teen 4-H leaders in peer mentoring. YMCA will provide mini-grants to 3 Community Action Project (Y-CAP) sites. Y-CAPs are YMCA centers dedicated to serving court-referred at-risk youth, and will use the mini-grants to create a Summer of Service camp for YMCA participants, led by middle school-aged Y-CAP teens. The curriculum framework development and training will be led by The YMCA Center for Asset Development, nationally recognized for its expertise in asset-based SL and youth leadership development. Students and staff will be trained in asset-based SL and will be evaluated using the Youth Asset Survey to determine the civic engagement and asset development in each of the participants. This LSA grant proposal for Seasons of Service projects will answer the Governor's challenge to raise the graduation rate, will make those solutions available to other youth agencies across the country, and will include youth as the change agents though asset-based SL. Over 10% of TN's high schools are dropout factories (Center for Social Organization of Schools). Out of school SL programs can combat the dropout crisis and increase graduation rates for TN. Volunteer Tennessee (VT) will partner with 3 of TN's largest youth organizations--4-H, YMCA, & BRIDGESPeaceJam-- to mobilize youth to lead out of school service programs during school breaks. This Seasons of Service (SOS) initiative will feature asset-based SL and social media tools. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 67
  • 70. This grant will also allow for the creation of replicable out of school SL frameworks. With the Center for Asset Development (CAD), the 3 partners will develop curriculum frameworks SOS programs that fit within the structures of their individual organizations and contribute to building essential assets. A skeletal framework will also be available so that non-profits worldwide use it. IDENTIFYING NEEDS VT will train partners to work with youth to identify community needs and assets, using the SL Standards for Quality Practice. Students will identify issues that are relevant to them, that lead to attainable and visible outcomes valued by those being served, and that are interesting and engaging. Program leaders will engage youth in asset mapping and decision-making. GOALS Create out of school asset-based SL opportunities for 11,150 TN youth using peer mentoring. Develop curriculum frameworks for out of school SL activities for each organization that can be used on the national level. Develop a skeletal framework for SOS that can be adapted to any youth agency worldwide. Increase TN's graduation rate. TIMELINE Year 1 will focus on developing the curriculum frameworks and piloting these programs. Year 2 will focus on using those curriculum frameworks to expand the SOS programs into sites across the state. Year 3 will focus on further expansion statewide. nationwide, & institutionalization, . Sept-Oct 2009 *Subgrant to 4-H, YMCA, BRIDGES-PeaceJam, & CAD *Train adult/youth leaders (led by CAD) - focus on the 40 developmental assets (building blocks for youth). CAD then works with each partner to develop the curriculum frameworks. TN LSA subgrantee annual training. *Subgrants submit pilot program outline and agenda. Jan 2010 MLK Day SL activities. Feb-Apr 2010 *VT site visits. *Spring break SL activities. * VT hosts annual Statewide SL Conference for SL practitioners across TN. Students manage a youth track; Campus Compact invited to organize a higher ed track. Jun-Aug 2010 Summer of Service activities. Year Round Fiscal monitoring site visits. Lions Quest SL trainings. Years 2 & 3 will include similar programming as Yr 1. Evaluation pre and post tests will be distributed and collected prior to each SOS activity planning and project period. SUBGRANTS RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 68
  • 71. VT will subgrant to 3 organizations for the duration of the grant. 4-H, YMCA, and BRIDGES- PeaceJam will each receive $80,000/year to implement SOS programs. CAD will receive $30,000/year to develop the curriculum frameworks and provide ongoing trainings. 4-H, YMCA, and BRIDGES- were strategically selected not only because of the high dropout rates in the city headquarters, but also because of their ability to impact up to 800,000 youth statewide, their national presence, their history of quality programs, and their impact on youth from rural and urban areas. Through the SOS grant, YMCA in TN will provide mini-grants to 3 YMCA Community Action Project (YCAP) sites. Y-CAP's are YMCA centers dedicated to serving court-referred at-risk youth. Y-CAP sites will create Summer of Service camps for YMCA participants, led by middle school Y-CAP teens. BRIDGES-PeaceJam is a collaboration between BRIDGES (one of the largest youth organizations in Memphis) and the International PeaceJam Foundation. With LSA funds, BRIDGES-PeaceJam will create a Leadership Institute in Memphis - combining a week-long summer institute, an MLK Day institute, and a Spring Break institute of service. TN 4-H will provide mini-grants to UT Extension Offices to create SL camps during the summer and spring/fall breaks for both urban and rural youth. These camps will pair younger members with teen 4- H leaders. CAD is nationally recognized for its expertise in asset-based SL, youth leadership development, teambuilding and youth-adult partnerships. CAD will consult with our partner agencies to design a basic SOS curriculum then tailor that curriculum to the partners' specific needs. CAD will deliver trainings throughout the grant to youth & adult leaders. Evaluation VT will competitively select an independent evaluator to compile results from the Youth Asset Survey, which measures civic engagement and asset development through SL activities. The Search Institute has shown that through SL, students can build assets such as empowerment, social competencies, and positive identity. Subgrantees will be responsible for finding control groups for this project in order for the evaluator to conduct a quasi-experimental research design. The evaluator will create an annual report that includes civic engagement and asset development of the youth in the SOS programs. Sustainability A major outcome of the grant is to develop a skeletal framework and customized curriculum frameworks that can be easily institutionalized. These frameworks will be available through conferences, websites, newsletters, blogs, and the National SL Clearinghouse. TN subgrantees will be trained in LSA identity. The statewide SL conference will also feature LSA subgrantee programs that will be encouraged to provide materials to youth participants that use the LSA logo. 4-H will be branding LSA through exhibits in each UT Extension office. Y-CAP sites partner with higher ed institutions to create alternative break programming, and BRIDGES plans to incorporate SOS into the organization's strategic plan. This Learn and Serve grant program will focus on involving youth in out of school service- learning projects to promote retention in schools. The three organizations included as subgrant partners represent the true diversity of the state of Tennessee and have programs in the RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 69
  • 72. counties with the highest dropout rates. BRIDGES youth programs currently engage students from EVERY public and private high school in Memphis and Shelby County, in addition to community and faith-based groups, making it the most diverse organization for youth in West Tennessee. The University of Tennessee Extension (4- H) has an office in all 95 counties of Tennessee and will be involving youth from rural and urban counties on projects together. Y- CAP programs specifically target court-referred at-risk youth who are experiencing problems in school, family dysfunction and who have committed either status or criminal offenses. These at-risk youth will be given the opportunity to be leaders in the Summer of Service camps and will work side by side with students from very different circumstances. In 2005-2006, 53% of TN students met criteria to be identified as economically disadvantaged, according to reports on students qualifying for free and reduced lunches. Harvard University Civil Rights Project research shows that poor, racially isolated Whites have low graduation rates that are nearly identical to poor, racially isolated Blacks. Nationally, few predominantly White schools have concentrated poverty, but there are significant numbers of these in parts of the rural South (including Tennessee). In 2008, the Kids Count report found that TN ranked 42nd among states with children living in poverty. In Memphis, 79.6% of the youth are characterized as economically disadvantaged (TN Report Card, 2008). The large youth organizations that are partners in this grant have a broad reach of students and will enable this grant program to impact the at-risk youth that make up the majority of Tennessee students. The SOS curriculum that will be developed for the three partners specifically and for a general youth service agency will have interactive pieces to teach youth how to incorporate the 6 steps of SL (IPARDC) into their SL work. Both Volunteer Tennessee and CAD have extensive experience in invigorating programs and engaging youth participants in vibrant service-learning that includes these key steps. They will teach group methods and provide tools for: Investigating community issues, Planning a project, Acting to address a problem, Reflecting on their experiences and the process, Demonstrating their work to a wider audience, and Celebrating. Volunteer TN and CAD understand how important it is that the process be understood and that adults and youth are equipped to go through the steps. One goal of this grant is for students to exhibit increased civic engagement. Intellectual and participatory skills that are prerequisites to an engaged citizenry are embedded in this service-learning model. Students learn to listen and question as they work cooperatively in small groups, and they are taught how to manage conflicts. Service-learning students will be guided in structured reflection activities that emphasize that the identification, analysis and debating skills they used to research and brainstorm ideas about the service-learning project or to reflect on the connection to learning objectives should be expanded to think of the state, country or world affairs consequences. Students will be encouraged to describe and identify the public and/or governmental context to the social issues. Staff and youth from 4-H, YMCA, and BRIDGES-PeaceJam will be trained in service-learning and civic engagement on-site at the beginning of the year and when they gather in Nashville for the annual Learn and Serve Subgrantee Institute. This grant will also focus on making sure that subgrantees understand the 40 developmental assets, the building blocks of healthy development, and how service-learning contributes to the overall well-being of the youth involved, as well as impacting the overall community. Empowerment is an asset category all by itself -- serving others is that important and is an important part of healthy development that helps youth thrive and keep them out of trouble. Look at just these few assets that are interwoven with a service-learning experience: service to others, youth seen as resources, caring, respect, responsibility, integrity, equality and social RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 70
  • 73. justice, planning and decision making, personal power, interpersonal competence, cultural competence. The research shows that the more assets a young person has, the better off they are. More assets = more thriving behaviors, and more assets = less participation in risky behaviors. Youth with 31-40 assets (the benchmark) exhibit appreciation of diversity, leadership, service to others, maintaining good health, success in school as well as delayed gratification. The SOS training time will challenge youth and adults to work together to implement their SOS programs. The curriculum frameworks will challenge adult leaders to engage youth in the various roles of implementation -- from recruitment to publicity to planning projects to evaluation to celebrating success. Adult leaders will also undergo a mock/modeled experiential SL day to 'feel' for themselves how things should be done in an asset-rich way and in a way that engages youth intentionally through each of the steps of the IPARDC. Each subgrantee site will also receive training in the Y-FACE (Youth Finding Activities in Community Engagement) social media tool to ensure that each youth is engaged from their own passion and that projects keep in mind the interests of all youth involved. The tool feeds into building assets: sense of purpose, planning and decision making, personal power. It helps students move beyond the questions of where they want to spend their time and what motivates them to what they appreciate about their communities and where they can start. If youth are engaged in service-learning activities that intersect with their daily interests, their service efforts are much more likely to be sustained over time. BRIDGES-PeaceJam will also use the 6 Steps of Kingian Nonviolence to reflect the IPARDC process in that students must understand both the context of an issue and diverse perspectives within the community, students must organize their data in order to educate their peers and build commitment, students design projects based upon collected data and goals for broad based initiatives that are decided through a youth-led consensus process, students engage local leaders in dialogue, engage in direct action when needed, and finally celebrate their experiences through the reconciliation process. Extension 4-H agents will be using the Youth Adult Partnership curriculum to provide resources to 4-H members related to youth/adult partnerships and ways to include youth in the planning and program design of 4- H. Through this grant, 4-H will develop an online training module to support the curriculum framework for SOS service-learning activities. This will allow for a farther reach into all counties across the state and other 4-H programs across the country. Community Needs and Service Activities TN LSA students will focus their efforts on dropout prevention as their critical need through out of school service-learning activities. Older students will be leading the "camps" and will serve as peer mentors to younger students at risk of dropping out. This model will result in all students having experiences that evidence shows will increase their likelihood of staying in school. All of the individual service-learning projects that occur during the SOS will be determined by each group of youth and peer mentors working in their communities to ferret out what is truly critical and important for them to address based on their passions, detective work and individual community needs. Community agencies will be asked to participate in meetings with youth leaders to share their concerns and knowledge of pertinent community issues. This process of engaging students in service-learning while serving as peer mentors for younger students is a dropout prevention strategy for all of the students involved. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 71
  • 74. Since February 7, 2006, when Governor Phil Bredesen used his annual State of the State Address to challenge the state to raise its high school graduation rate to 90% by 2012, innovative programs to support and retain students in high school have blossomed across Tennessee. The Governor demonstrated his commitment to raising standards and expectations for our students by hosting 6 CEO Roundtables. The Tennessee Business Roundtable, with financial support from the Hyde Family Foundations of Memphis, worked with major chambers of commerce to organize these regional roundtable discussions, or informal focus groups, in six local communities across the state. The discussions were a huge success with participation by 128 CEOs from 126 of Tennessee's leading businesses and industries. On March 18, 2009, a Dropout Prevention Summit for Tennessee was held in conjunction with the National Service-Learning Conference. Since service-learning already plays a role in parts of the National Action Strategies, the 10-Point Plan and the American Diploma Project and is a proven dropout prevention strategy on its own, the Summit addressed the potential role of service-learning in a dropout prevention plan. The Summit brought energy to the goal of fostering statewide collaboration among schools, businesses, foundations, and youth service organizations to improve high school graduation rates. Governor Bredesen spoke at the Dropout Prevention Summit and encouraged the development of programs that help students become engaged citizens and that give them a meaningful body of knowledge and a skill set that applies to the demands of today's workplace. Service-learning programs provide these tools. The Silent Epidemic report calls for a national movement to listen to the voices of young people who have dropped out of school by holding public forums in communities beset by high dropout rates and dynamic strategies for lowering them. At the Dropout Prevention Summit, a panel of students discussed the reasons that they stayed in school rather than dropping out. The majority of the students said that the reason they stayed in school was because they were engaged in a strong out of school service opportunity. This Learn and Serve America grant proposal for Seasons of Service projects will answer the Governor's challenge to raise the graduation rate, will make those solutions available to other youth agencies across the country, and will include youth as the change agents. Tennessee ranks 26th in the nation in graduation rates, according to the Education Research Center. The U.S. Department of Education reported that only 66.1% of students in Tennessee graduated in 2007. In Memphis, the graduation rate is 16% lower than the state average (TN Report Card, 2008). These statistics illuminate the fact that low graduation rates is one of the most persistent and difficult issues we face. As a state, we must find ways to engage our students in activities that keep them in school. A previous study by Dr. Molly Laird in 2005 found that alternative school students in Tennessee participating in out of school service- learning reduced their school absences by 52%. It is a strategy that works. The National Dropout Prevention Center lists out of school time and service-learning as two dropout prevention strategies. A third that they mention is mentoring. This Learn and Serve grant would allow Tennessee students to use all of these strategies by serving as leaders at these SOS camps and mentoring other younger students who are at risk of dropping out of school, by doing service-learning projects, and by using out of school time to improve their communities. This grant program is designed to institutionalize summer, spring, and fall break service- learning programs in three large youth agencies across the state (4-H, YMCA, and BRIDGES- PeaceJam). By the end of the grant, a curriculum framework will be established for each of these organizations that can be used nationally. A 4th more skeletal framework will also be RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 72
  • 75. created and will be available for any youth agency worldwide to adapt for its own SOS programs. Volunteer Tennessee will offer training sessions at the fall Learn and Serve Subgrantee Institute on collaborative partnerships at the local level and will encourage adult volunteers to be engaged in service-learning programs. Volunteer Tennessee will use its cross streaming guide that includes information about each national service program in the state and a visual map that shows the locations to encourage cross streaming with AmeriCorps and Senior Corps programs. Volunteer Center information and United Way information will be made available to each of the organizations, as well. Volunteer Tennessee will continue its partnership with the Lions Quest curriculum/training program and Lions Clubs programs so that each subgrantee will have access to a service-learning curriculum and training and adult volunteers for their projects. Volunteer Tennessee will also use its partnership with Campus Compact to encourage sustainable collaborations for Alternative Spring and Fall Break activities involving the subgrantee organizations and higher education institutions. The Y-CAP program will build on its partnership with the juvenile court system and will work to infuse service-learning into more of its programs. 4-H and BRIDGES will continue their partnerships with the local schools systems in their areas to recruit students to participate in their service-learning programs. 4-H will also work with the County 4-H Advisory Boards in each county, comprised of leaders from various community and governmental organizations, to help guide and strengthen the SOS programs. Volunteer TN will require an MOU from a partner agency/school each year from each subgrantee. Social media tools will be used throughout this grant. 4-H will develop an online tool for youth and adults related to Social Networking and will show how this can be used in their service- learning programs. BRIDGES-PeaceJam will incorporate tools such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube into an online interface to enable staff and youth to communicate, collect, and share data and organize efficiently in order to accomplish youth-developed service-learning outcomes. CAD will be using social media tools as a recruitment/involvement tool in the training academies. Each partner agency will use the curriculum framework developed to institutionalize SOS activities in their organizations on the state and national levels. Volunteer Tennessee will make these frameworks available on its website and will also submit them to the National Service- Learning Clearinghouse so that all youth agencies will have access to them. Presentations about this SOS model will also be made at the Statewide Service-Learning Conference. In addition, BRIDGES will incorporate service-learning into the strategic plan for their entire organization so that by 2012, all BRIDGES youth (approximately 10,000) will be participating in service-learning. Tennessee 4-H will use two annual state-wide inservice training venues and several regional in-service training venues planned for Extension 4-H Agents to institutionalize this model into their programs. Y-CAP will work with the juvenile court to advocate for a continued partnership and expansion of this program on a state and national level. Organizational Capacity The Y-CAP programs will be seeking partnerships with Belmont University, Vanderbilt University, and Tennessee State University during their alternative spring breaks to "combine RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 73
  • 76. forces" and offer service-learning opportunities together. 4-H will be modeling a similar partnership with the Agricultural Leadership Program at UT Knoxville. a) Federal Grant Experience/Track Record Volunteer Tennessee has 15 years of experience managing federal grants and has successfully administered four Learn and Serve America Community-based grants in that time. As a state agency, Volunteer Tennessee has full access to the state's expansive systems for grant compliance, fund management and fiscal oversight. Volunteer Tennessee has extensive experience in managing subgrantees and solid systems for documenting and verifying cash and in-kind match both at the grantee and subgrantee levels. In addition to the constant oversight of staff, Volunteer Tennessee also receives periodic review from the State of Tennessee Comptroller and the Tennessee Department of Finance and Administration Division of Internal Audit. In the most recent Corporation for National and Community Service Administrative Standards Review, Volunteer Tennessee met all of the standards at the time of the review: a clear indication that Volunteer Tennessee understands Corporation for National and Community Service grant requirements. b) Program/Fiscal Oversight As noted in the previous section, Volunteer Tennessee has extensive grant oversight experience. As a State agency, Volunteer Tennessee has strong fiscal systems supported by the State infrastructure. In the most recent CNCS Inspector General audit, the auditors questioned less than 0.1% of Volunteer Tennessee's expenditures. Volunteer Tennessee is administratively attached to the TN Department of Finance & Administration, which currently administers more than $40 million in federal grants from CNCS and the Department of Justice. Volunteer Tennessee is audited annually as part of the Single Audit for the State of TN. Volunteer Tennessee implements ongoing self-assessment through event evaluations, regular staff check-ins, and semi-annual staff performance reviews. Staff also address continuous improvement issues at monthly staff meetings and at annual staff retreats. The Service- Learning team meets weekly to assign tasks and reflect on team progress. Volunteer Tennessee strives to incorporate continuous improvement into all aspects of operations. Volunteer Tennessee will replicate effective training strategies from past Learn and Serve America programs, Lions-Quest, and the Aspire youth leadership program to provide technical assistance to subgrantees. In fall 2009, Volunteer Tennessee and the Center for Asset Development staff will train the program coordinators and grant administrators from each partner organization. The program coordinators will be trained in topics that will include the service-learning cycle and the 40 developmental assets. The grant administrators will be trained on Learn and Serve America grant requirements, especially performance measures and prohibited activities. As in previous grants, the external evaluator will work directly with grant administrators (and/or program coordinators) to explain procedures for pre- and post-test data collection for youth performance. The initial training will also cover forms for match documentation, reporting, partnership development and grant reimbursements. Through ongoing assessment Volunteer Tennessee will determine the training and technical assistance needs of the subgrantees. The annual Statewide Service-Learning Conference will address these needs with appropriate training sessions. Volunteer Tennessee will dedicate one full-time staff member, the Learn and Serve program officer, to the management of this grant, including ongoing support and assessment of subgrantees. Through check-in calls, in-person discussions at trainings, and close monitoring RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 74
  • 77. of progress reports, the Learn and Serve program officer will maintain a constant awareness of subgrantee strengths and areas for improvement. Subgrantees will receive at least one on-site technical assistance visit from the Learn and Serve program officer to asses their progress towards meeting performance measures. In addition, each subgrantee will receive one monitoring visit from Volunteer Tennessee's full-time monitor to assess fiscal and programmatic progress and compliance. c) Previous Experience with Learn and Serve America (or Corporation) Grants. Almost all of the Volunteer Tennessee staff have served as AmeriCorps members and/or as staff at local AmeriCorps programs and have a deep understanding of Corporation for National and Community Service programs and National Service program management. Volunteer Tennessee has also managed four Learn and Serve America grants in the past and has a long-standing partnership with the Tennessee Department of Education to provide technical assistance to Learn and Serve America School-based Formula subgrantees. Through previous Learn and Serve America funding, over 60,000 students participated in thousands of service-learning initiatives across the state. The Learn and Serve America activities reduced suspended students absences by 52%, reduced participant suspensions, improved at-risk student attitudes related to school connectedness and about being leaders, educated youth about the dangers of methamphetamine use, incorporated service-learning into existing 4-H programming, and infused service-learning into the Youth Court model. Volunteer Tennessee used Learn and Serve America funding to leverage Lions Clubs International funding to provide training to thousands of teachers. d) Staff Roles and Experience Jim Snell, Executive Director: Provides general oversight to Volunteer Tennessee programs including AmeriCorps and Learn and Serve America programs. He has 9 years of experience at Volunteer Budget Adequacy & Cost Effectiveness Tennessee providing support and oversight for federal grant programs. He also served two years as an AmeriCorps program director. Meredith Freeman, Deputy Director: Manages Volunteer Tennessee's Service-Learning team, coordinates statewide training, oversees service-learning evaluation, and manages Lions Clubs International partnership. She has 6 years of experience at Volunteer Tennessee providing support and oversight for federal grant programs. To be filled, Learn & Serve Program Officer: Volunteer TN will seek a full-time program officer to provide day-to-day oversight of the grant activities. We will seek someone who has service- learning experience, federal grants management experience and experience working with coalitions and partnerships. Neelam Gupta, Monitoring Coordinator: Provides programmatic and fiscal monitoring of Volunteer TN sub-grantees. She has over 8 years experience monitoring sub-grants. The Dept. of Finance & Administration Office of Business & Finance provides fiscal support for Volunteer TN. Each Seasons of Service partner also has the infrastructure and experience to insure successful implementation of this grant project. Volunteer Tennessee follows standard state salary, procurement and travel regulations to keep costs low. Volunteer Tennessee salaries are below comparable levels in other states and mileage reimbursement RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 75
  • 78. rates always lag the IRS. Volunteer Tennessee and its partners seek community support through donated space for trainings, shared rooms in trainings and support from local Lions clubs for training refreshments. These factors lead to a very cost-effective program. In addition, service-learning is a cost effective intervention for disadvantaged youth. As an example, if the youth referred to the Y-CAP program by the court were incarcerated, it would cost $30,000 per year per youth to keep them locked up. This program will leverage $371,264 annually in dollar for dollar match, primarily in the form of partner match. Volunteer Tennessee will also directly leverage funds from the Lions Clubs International Foundation and America's Promise Alliance as match. All elements of the budget connect directly with the Season of Service program activities. The main program budget includes Volunteer Tennessee staff to coordinate, support and monitor the grant during the 3-year grant period. Each partner in the Seasons of Service initiative will play a critical part in achieving the goals of the proposed program. The main program budget reflects this in that the majority of the funds will be sub-granted by Volunteer Tennessee to partners. Although not detailed in the main budget, each partner budget will directly support the desired outcomes of the Seasons of Service initiative. Partner budgets will devote a sufficient amount of funds to staff to support the grant activities. The partner budgets will also support development of program related materials and attendance at the statewide meetings that will be used to develop and share best practices. This investment will yield additional dividends through replication potential. The curriculum framework that each subgrantee develops will be readily transferable to their national partner agencies. By partnering with well established organizations that have local, state and national connections, the Seasons of Service initiative will build support for the program at all three levels. This program will also be able to build on the established regional teacher training system supported in part by the Lions Club International Foundation and local Lions Clubs. It builds on the national service-learning training through Lions-Quest International, recognized as highly effective by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) and Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL). Clarification Summary Volunteer Tennessee seeks to use service-learning to generate measurable outcomes for dropout prevention and afterschool participants. Institutionalization comes on every level as service-learning proves its worth by being part of the solution to critical public challenges. The long-term goals of institutionalization of service-learning and replication of the program make the Seasons of Service initiative very cost effective. The budget for this grant application has been revised to reflect a total LSA funding of $586,996 over a two year time period. This revised funding amount and timeline will still allow for quality Seasons of Service curricula to be developed and available for duplication/adaptation. The only significant change will be the number of students involved in the grant, due to the two year period rather than three year period. The items that need to be clarified are as follows: *Volunteer Tennessee's computer lease program costs are fixed and are based on a state- negotiated rate. This rate includes the computer lease and the IT support for the computer. All TN State employees must lease a computer. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 76
  • 79. *The Lions Quest trainings will be available not only to the 3 partner organizations involved in this grant but also to other community-based organizations interested in service-learning. Through this training, Volunteer TN will be able to generate interest in service-learning from community-based organizations and, more specifically, in the Seasons of Service activities. * America's Promise granted Volunteer TN with funds to subgrant to the 10 TN districts with the highest dropout rates so that each district can hold its own summit and develop strategies to combat the dropout epidemic. Volunteer TN will be awarding these subgrants and will be providing service-learning resources and strategies to each district. Service-learning trainings will also be available to the subgrantees. Each subgrantee will also be connected with the Seasons of Service partners so that the curricula developed can be used as a tool for dropout prevention. *TN State Farm grants are available to districts that participated in the Volunteer TN Dropout Prevention Summit (the 10 districts with the highest dropout rate). These grants are available to applicants that demonstrate strategies involving the 8 elements of high quality service-learning. Each grantee will also be connected with the Seasons of Service partners and curriculum frameworks so that they can use these tools for dropout prevention. *The SL coordinator monitoring travel refers to program support site visits for 4-H, YMCA, and BRIDGES-PeaceJam. The LSA monitoring travel refers to the fiscal monitoring for each site by the grants monitor on staff at Volunteer TN. Performance Measures Measure Category: Participant Development Output: 5,000 K-12 students will participate in Seasons of Service activities over the two year period. Intermediate Outcome: As a result of Seasons of Service activities, 75% of participating students will improve in civic engagement. End Outcome: As a result of Seasons of Service activities, 90% of participating students will graduate from high school. RFP # 31701-11070 PAGE 77