Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
constructing social power through academic literacy
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

constructing social power through academic literacy

85

Published on

presentation of research on construction of power through academic literacy in a Romanian University …

presentation of research on construction of power through academic literacy in a Romanian University
drawing on works of David Barton, Roz Ivanic, Bordieu

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
85
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • when we think we teach reading and writing we do much more than that
    we introduce our students to a way to approach and conceive knowledge
    we tell them what constitutes knowledge and how knowledge is to be produced
    we create opportunities for them to position themselves towards existing knowledge
    we open or close ways of being and ways of thinking
  • Power in discourse
    the control exercised by those in power over the contribution of non-powerful participants through imposing constraints: content (what is said or done), on relations (the social relations people enter when using language), on subject positions people use; how are the events defined (e.g lecture, exam) – what roles are available to people to take.
    Power behin discourse
    preferences for certain genres, lexical choice, graphical layout, topics, speech acts
  • Most of texts indicated or given by teacher: control over genres, topics, language
    All texts are disembedded from social context and they all belong to the literacy specific for ‘educated’ people: only one type of literacy is privileged: through these texts, students are tolld what counnts as literacy and as knowledge
  • Transcript

    • 1.  The Power of Literacy
    • 2.  The Power of Literacy The limits of my language mean the limits of my world. Ludwig Wittgenstein 02/25/14
    • 3.  The Power of Literacy overview        introducing the research study concepts and definitions some texts in the academy the essay : practices and texts the language exercise: practices and texts opening for alternatives the power of literacy 02/25/14
    • 4.  The Power of Literacy introducing the research RQ: how is social power enacted through academic literacy Research: qualitative Co-researchers: 2nd year students languages Data: course generated & research generated Analytical frameworks: 02/25/14 ethnographic content analysis CDA: textual analysis
    • 5.  The Power of Literacy concepts and definitions literacy practices General cultural ways of utilizing written language which people draw upon in their lives texts Particular configurations of institutionally available literacy practices social power Relations of difference created by unequal access to and control over symbolic resources symbolic resources knowledge, discourse, self esteem; content, events & roles 02/25/14
    • 6.  The Power of Literacy some texts in the academy written texts essays, compositions, translations, notes, literature commentaries, analyses, seminar papers, term papers, language exercises, paragraphs, exam papers, letters, descriptions, ‘characterisations’ reading texts classical fiction, poetry, biography/autobiography, quotations, lecture notes, grammar/linguistics studies, dictionary entries, literature in the area of psychology/pedagogy 02/25/14
    • 7.  The Power of Literacy the essay : practices (I) representations of essays talent, cocktail of ideas, space of freedom what is knowledge and how is new knowledge created expectations of the teacher ‘be explicit’, ‘argument’, ‘be creative, ‘be imaginative’ linguistically expressed in a way that does not support students to make sense of it - discourse of mystery 02/25/14
    • 8.  The Power of Literacy the essay : practices (II) talk about literacy task (very general, not inviting SS to draw on critical competences, talk towards text/essay bibliography, choice of topics), discussion (? pre, while, post presentation, feedback (written, oral, mark) reduced, controlled by teacher, no new knowledge creation encouraged, recognition literacy encouraged as move in interaction roles of teachers and students: how much, what mainly teacher, mainly control and assessment 02/25/14
    • 9.  The Power of Literacy the essay: texts (I) definition The most general definitions of the essay refer to texts in which a writer discusses ‘a topic’ and in doing so s/he expresses ‘a point of view on that topic’ (Ivanic, 1998: 114, Richards, Platt, Platt, 1992: 128-9). 02/25/14
    • 10.  The Power of Literacy the essay: texts (I) purpose instrumental (get marks, approval)/less communicative (own opinion, point of view) task and theme only literature, text mediated representations of the social world , ‘inside university’ structure and argument show that no new knowledge is produced in most of the cases, but ‘teacher talk’ is restituted: Ts know what they say 02/25/14
    • 11.  The Power of Literacy the essay: texts (III) identity and voice SSs presence in the text not signaled, SS positioned as restituters, within literary studies, not as researchers intertextuality dialogue mostly with teacher written or teacher indicated texts Layout and semiotic mode monolithic, exclusively verbal, handwritten, etc 02/25/14
    • 12.  The Power of Literacy findings      lack of alternatives student disempowerment attitude to knowledge/making: recognition lack of critical position lack of awareness of ‘outside university’ world/resources 02/25/14
    • 13.  The Power of Literacy the essay: a different definition (I) Analysis of essay rhetoric brings to light pathological forms of verbal restitution. The essay writer reinstates the professorial word through processes of levelling, reinterpretation and de-contextualisation which point not to a cultural apprenticeship at work, but to the logic of acculturation. The typical essay is characterised by a discourse of allusion and ellipsis. This presupposes student complicity in and through linguistic misunderstanding which today defines the teaching relationship. (Bordieu, 1994) 02/25/14
    • 14.  The Power of Literacy the essay: a different definition (II) ‘Indeed, there is nothing that he requires of the language of students except that it ‘points to’ a possible discourse, the complete knowledge and comprehension of which lie with him alone. This applies to the thoughts of particular authors, as well as to his own ideas. Students adjust perfectly to this discourse which can be read from hints, because it is necessarily the lecturer, not the student, who is supposed to posses the balance of the words unsaid. ’I don’t understand what students write’, one academic admits. ’Or at least I get the feeling I shouldn’t understand. Of course I do know what they’re getting at because I know the last word in the story – it’s the same story I told them. The sloppy way they use technical terms is worrying, but we fill the gaps.’ 02/25/14
    • 15.  The Power of Literacy implications      when we think we teach reading and writing we do much more than that we introduce our students to a way to approach and conceive knowledge we tell them what constitutes knowledge and how knowledge is to be produced we create opportunities for them to position themselves towards existing knowledge we open or close ways of being and ways of thinking 02/25/14
    • 16.  The Power of Literacy possible alternatives project work? other 02/25/14
    • 17.  The Power of Literacy  discussions  questions  comments   02/25/14

    ×