Social Gaming for Events

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  • 2 minute discussion in groups of 2.\n
  • Ralph Koster, A Theory of Fun\n
  • Ralph Koster, A Theory of Fun\n
  • Ralph Koster, A Theory of Fun\n
  • Ralph Koster, A Theory of Fun\n
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  • Our best moments (the ones we claim to enjoy the most) occur when we’re voluntarily trying to accomplish something difficult for which we have the right skills.\nadults want to use what they know and be acknowledged for having that knowledge\nadults must experience a need to learn something in order to solve real-life tasks or problems \nencourage learners’ readiness to learn by designing situations where the student will encounter a need for their knowledge or skill\n\n
  • Our best moments (the ones we claim to enjoy the most) occur when we’re voluntarily trying to accomplish something difficult for which we have the right skills.\nadults want to use what they know and be acknowledged for having that knowledge\nadults must experience a need to learn something in order to solve real-life tasks or problems \nencourage learners’ readiness to learn by designing situations where the student will encounter a need for their knowledge or skill\n\n
  • Our best moments (the ones we claim to enjoy the most) occur when we’re voluntarily trying to accomplish something difficult for which we have the right skills.\nadults want to use what they know and be acknowledged for having that knowledge\nadults must experience a need to learn something in order to solve real-life tasks or problems \nencourage learners’ readiness to learn by designing situations where the student will encounter a need for their knowledge or skill\n\n
  • Our best moments (the ones we claim to enjoy the most) occur when we’re voluntarily trying to accomplish something difficult for which we have the right skills.\nadults want to use what they know and be acknowledged for having that knowledge\nadults must experience a need to learn something in order to solve real-life tasks or problems \nencourage learners’ readiness to learn by designing situations where the student will encounter a need for their knowledge or skill\n\n
  • Our best moments (the ones we claim to enjoy the most) occur when we’re voluntarily trying to accomplish something difficult for which we have the right skills.\nadults want to use what they know and be acknowledged for having that knowledge\nadults must experience a need to learn something in order to solve real-life tasks or problems \nencourage learners’ readiness to learn by designing situations where the student will encounter a need for their knowledge or skill\n\n
  • Our best moments (the ones we claim to enjoy the most) occur when we’re voluntarily trying to accomplish something difficult for which we have the right skills.\nadults want to use what they know and be acknowledged for having that knowledge\nadults must experience a need to learn something in order to solve real-life tasks or problems \nencourage learners’ readiness to learn by designing situations where the student will encounter a need for their knowledge or skill\n\n
  • Our best moments (the ones we claim to enjoy the most) occur when we’re voluntarily trying to accomplish something difficult for which we have the right skills.\nadults want to use what they know and be acknowledged for having that knowledge\nadults must experience a need to learn something in order to solve real-life tasks or problems \nencourage learners’ readiness to learn by designing situations where the student will encounter a need for their knowledge or skill\n\n
  • Our best moments (the ones we claim to enjoy the most) occur when we’re voluntarily trying to accomplish something difficult for which we have the right skills.\nadults want to use what they know and be acknowledged for having that knowledge\nadults must experience a need to learn something in order to solve real-life tasks or problems \nencourage learners’ readiness to learn by designing situations where the student will encounter a need for their knowledge or skill\n\n
  • Communitas is an anthropoligical term for the spirit of community. a powerful sense of togetherness, solidarity and social connection. Protects againt loneliness and isolation.\n
  • Communitas is an anthropoligical term for the spirit of community. a powerful sense of togetherness, solidarity and social connection. Protects againt loneliness and isolation.\n
  • Communitas is an anthropoligical term for the spirit of community. a powerful sense of togetherness, solidarity and social connection. Protects againt loneliness and isolation.\n
  • We have social media - most people have the food table.\n\nWe develop identity with a community\nSense of belonging at all times\nAchieving goals gives a sense of shared, common interests.\nAlso, fosters innovation.\n
  • We have social media - most people have the food table.\n\nWe develop identity with a community\nSense of belonging at all times\nAchieving goals gives a sense of shared, common interests.\nAlso, fosters innovation.\n
  • We have social media - most people have the food table.\n\nWe develop identity with a community\nSense of belonging at all times\nAchieving goals gives a sense of shared, common interests.\nAlso, fosters innovation.\n
  • We have social media - most people have the food table.\n\nWe develop identity with a community\nSense of belonging at all times\nAchieving goals gives a sense of shared, common interests.\nAlso, fosters innovation.\n
  • We have social media - most people have the food table.\n\nWe develop identity with a community\nSense of belonging at all times\nAchieving goals gives a sense of shared, common interests.\nAlso, fosters innovation.\n
  • Risk, Strategico. \nFootball, sports-oriented. \nRole Playing - problem solving. All three allow conflict to be practiced.\nExploration - learn about an environment, physical product or space. Scvng, Foursquare or association exploring new website.\nBuilding, much the same.\nHide and Seek combines strategy, exploration of an environment and action\n\n
  • Risk, Strategico. \nFootball, sports-oriented. \nRole Playing - problem solving. All three allow conflict to be practiced.\nExploration - learn about an environment, physical product or space. Scvng, Foursquare or association exploring new website.\nBuilding, much the same.\nHide and Seek combines strategy, exploration of an environment and action\n\n
  • Risk, Strategico. \nFootball, sports-oriented. \nRole Playing - problem solving. All three allow conflict to be practiced.\nExploration - learn about an environment, physical product or space. Scvng, Foursquare or association exploring new website.\nBuilding, much the same.\nHide and Seek combines strategy, exploration of an environment and action\n\n
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  • Social Gaming for Events

    1. 1. Social Gaming for Events in partnership with An Production
    2. 2. V
    3. 3. Playing that game made me feel _________.
    4. 4. Co-creation
    5. 5. Game Environment• What type of organization is it?• Why is the event held?• What is the format?• Demographics?• Who are the stakeholders?
    6. 6. Framing the Game• How will this improve your event or support organizational goals or initiatives?• How will this help your stakeholders?• Discussion: Business Objectives
    7. 7. B o r e d o m
    8. 8. B o r e d o m“Boredom is the brain casting about for newinformation. It is the feeling you get when there are nonew patterns to absorb.”
    9. 9. B o r e d o m“Boredom is the brain casting about for newinformation. It is the feeling you get when there are nonew patterns to absorb.”“Fun from games arises out of mastery. It arises out ofcomprehension. It is the act of solving puzzles thatmakes games fun. In other words, with games, learningis the drug” - Ralph Koster, A Theory of Fun That’s a good book to read! So is “Total Engagement”
    10. 10. D e t a c h m e n t“We know from considerable research on thehuman brain that people learn more deeplywhen there is an emotional attachment totheir learning and problem solving, whensomething is at stake for thempersonally.”-James Paul Gee, Deep Learning Properties of GoodDigital Games
    11. 11. Boredom Busters
    12. 12. Boredom BustersPlay/Fun - Role in Learning and Problem Solving
    13. 13. Boredom BustersPlay/Fun - Role in Learning and Problem Solving While playing, we enter a state of flow (“flow”: Mihaly Csikzentmihalyi)
    14. 14. Boredom BustersPlay/Fun - Role in Learning and Problem Solving While playing, we enter a state of flow It’s SAFE! (“flow”: Mihaly Csikzentmihalyi)
    15. 15. Boredom BustersPlay/Fun - Role in Learning and Problem Solving While playing, we enter a state of flow It’s SAFE! Emotional Engagement = Total Commitment (“flow”: Mihaly Csikzentmihalyi)
    16. 16. Boredom BustersPlay/Fun - Role in Learning and Problem Solving While playing, we enter a state of flow It’s SAFE! Emotional Engagement = Total Commitment Competition = Engagement (“flow”: Mihaly Csikzentmihalyi)
    17. 17. Boredom Busters Play/Fun - Role in Learning and Problem Solving While playing, we enter a state of flow It’s SAFE! Emotional Engagement = Total Commitment Competition = Engagement Pedagogy (“flow”: Mihaly Csikzentmihalyi)(Pedagogy: Malcom Knowles, Alexander Kapp)
    18. 18. I s o l a t i o n
    19. 19. I s o l a t i o n“Even a small taste of communitas can be enough tobring us back to the social world if we feel isolatedfrom it, or to renew our commitment to participatingactively and positively...”
    20. 20. I s o l a t i o n“Even a small taste of communitas can be enough tobring us back to the social world if we feel isolatedfrom it, or to renew our commitment to participatingactively and positively...”“Experiencing a short burst of community in a spacethat previously felt uninviting or simplyuninteresting...becomes a space for us to act and to beof service, not just to pass through or observe.”
    21. 21. I s o l a t i o n“Even a small taste of communitas can be enough tobring us back to the social world if we feel isolatedfrom it, or to renew our commitment to participatingactively and positively...”“Experiencing a short burst of community in a spacethat previously felt uninviting or simplyuninteresting...becomes a space for us to act and to beof service, not just to pass through or observe.” - Jane McGonigal, Reality is Broken
    22. 22. Communitas
    23. 23. CommunitasEliminates Exclusivity
    24. 24. CommunitasEliminates ExclusivityEmotional Connections
    25. 25. CommunitasEliminates ExclusivityEmotional ConnectionsTrust
    26. 26. CommunitasEliminates ExclusivityEmotional ConnectionsTrustFosters innovation
    27. 27. CommunitasEliminates ExclusivityEmotional ConnectionsTrustFosters innovation
    28. 28. Types of Games
    29. 29. Types of GamesTypes of Games Hide & Seek Strategy Action Finite v. Infinite Role Playing Exploration Building
    30. 30. Types of GamesTypes of Games Hide & Seek Strategy Action Finite v. Infinite Role Playing Exploration Building
    31. 31. Game Mechanics All games share four defining traits:1. A goal,2. Rules,3. A feedback system,4. Voluntary participation. (source: “Reality is Broken”, Jane McGonigal)
    32. 32. Mechanics, Cont’dSupporting Elements Roles Challenge to Overcome Increasing difficulty* Rewards
    33. 33. Co-creation Continued
    34. 34. Let’s Build It!• Goal• Rules• Roles• Feedback system• Increasing Difficulty*• Reward
    35. 35. A Few Good Ideas
    36. 36. A Few Good IdeasCEC’s/CEU’s
    37. 37. A Few Good IdeasCEC’s/CEU’sCSR Activities
    38. 38. A Few Good IdeasCEC’s/CEU’sCSR ActivitiesSponsored CheatCodes
    39. 39. A Few Good IdeasCEC’s/CEU’sCSR ActivitiesSponsored CheatCodesGeoteaming
    40. 40. A Few Good IdeasCEC’s/CEU’sCSR ActivitiesSponsored CheatCodesGeoteamingAugmented Reality
    41. 41. A Few Good IdeasCEC’s/CEU’s RFID - gamepiecesCSR ActivitiesSponsored CheatCodesGeoteamingAugmented Reality
    42. 42. A Few Good IdeasCEC’s/CEU’s RFID - gamepiecesCSR Activities Transform Board GamesSponsored CheatCodesGeoteamingAugmented Reality
    43. 43. A Few Good IdeasCEC’s/CEU’s RFID - gamepiecesCSR Activities Transform Board GamesSponsored CheatCodes Mobile: Custom, Scvngr, QR CodesGeoteamingAugmented Reality
    44. 44. The session is never over!Jessica Levin, MidoriMBA, CMP ConnollySeven Degrees AVGirlCommunications midori@pulsestaging.comengage@sevendegreescommunications.com @GreenA_V@JessicaLevin gplus.to/midoricgplus.to/jessicalevin http://bit.ly/wec11gaming
    45. 45. Still not convinced?
    46. 46. Still not convinced?• In the United States alone, there are 183 million active gamers (playing, on average, 13 hours per week). Globally this number reaches almost 300 million.• 69% of all heads of household play computer and video games.• 40% of all gamers are women.• 61% of CEOs, CFOs and other senior executives say they take daily game breaks at work.

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