Graduation Programs: Creating Ladders Out of Extreme Poverty

October 9, 20113

By: Elizabeth Naah
Implementation Coordina...
• Context of poverty in Ghana
• Over 40% people live on less than a dollar a-day
• About 50% poor live in rural and depriv...
• The Pilot
• Inspired by BRAC and promoted by CGAP/Ford as part of their
global graduation program
• Northern Ghana
• Aim...
• Program goals
• To move households from chronic extreme poverty into selfsufficiency
• To develop sustainable livelihood...
Evaluation design
– Graduation from Ultra poverty (GUP) – 662 households
• Transfer of assets for enterprise development (...
• Evaluation still ongoing
• Implementation achievements:
Livestock assets

Number of clients

July 2011

July 2013

Goats...
• Key lessons learned:
– How best to select ultra poor household - Full suite of PWR
– Encourage certain good practices/be...
• Key lessons learned Cont.
– Transparent and solid finance systems is essential
– Clients increased their participation i...
• Next steps:
– Plan and discussion underway to provide money boxes to savings
clients
– Some rural banks have opened new ...
• Some final lessons learnt…
– Graduation programs definitely require integration
– It also requires genuine and coordinat...
Thank You!
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Graduation programs creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah

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  • GUP: Graduation from Ultra PovertySOUP: Savings Out of Poverty
  • GUP: Graduation from Ultra PovertySOUP: Savings Out of Poverty
  • Graduation programs creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah

    1. 1. Graduation Programs: Creating Ladders Out of Extreme Poverty October 9, 20113 By: Elizabeth Naah Implementation Coordinator, IPA Ghana
    2. 2. • Context of poverty in Ghana • Over 40% people live on less than a dollar a-day • About 50% poor live in rural and deprived communities • Problems such as: poor feeding practices, poor sanitation, inadequate health care, lack of potable water etc. • Absence of government and NGO programs • Lack of collaboration between gov’t/NGOs frustrate implementers
    3. 3. • The Pilot • Inspired by BRAC and promoted by CGAP/Ford as part of their global graduation program • Northern Ghana • Aim: moving ultra poor out of extreme poverty • 1,394 clients in 155 communities • Selection of “ultra poor”: participatory wealth ranking (PWR) • Provided services/products • The Partners • Presbyterian Agricultural Services (PAS)-local NGO • IPA, Ghana
    4. 4. • Program goals • To move households from chronic extreme poverty into selfsufficiency • To develop sustainable livelihoods for the ultra poor • To graduate the Ultra poor to be able to participate in microfinance, if they so choose • Evaluate program components using RCT methodology • • • • Three districts 4000 households (1394 “treatment”) 30 field extension agents providing services to clients 24 months
    5. 5. Evaluation design – Graduation from Ultra poverty (GUP) – 662 households • Transfer of assets for enterprise development (goats, pigs, poultry, processing equipment for Shea butter/ rice/ malt, farming inputs) • Enterprise development training and weekly coaching • Consumption support • National Health Insurance • Mobilization of savings (weekly; 50% of GUP) • Health/nutrition and finance education (weekly) – Savings Out of Ultra Poverty (SOUP) – 732 households • Mobilized savings (weekly) • One time finance training – Asset Only program – 131 households • One time dropping of 4 goats per client – Bag Add-ons program – 1200 households • Skills training • Materials for bag making • Paid a piece rate per bag sown
    6. 6. • Evaluation still ongoing • Implementation achievements: Livestock assets Number of clients July 2011 July 2013 Goats 499 1969 4630 Hens 397 1589 3810 Pigs 24 48 650 – 1045 bank accounts opened with rural banks – ~95% of saving clients saved regularly – More than $50 saved per client; mobilization of over $48k savings – Provision of over $150k of consumption support
    7. 7. • Key lessons learned: – How best to select ultra poor household - Full suite of PWR – Encourage certain good practices/behaviors - cultural practices should be carefully looked at and handled – Weekly debriefing meetings with field agents – Re-sensitization of community committees – Intensive monitoring
    8. 8. • Key lessons learned Cont. – Transparent and solid finance systems is essential – Clients increased their participation in community gatherings/decision making – Continuous dialoging with Government/NGOs would help. – Link graduation programs with Safety net programs – Proper exiting is important
    9. 9. • Next steps: – Plan and discussion underway to provide money boxes to savings clients – Some rural banks have opened new branches – The rural banks started re-sensitization on savings – IPA plans to expand depending on evaluation results – PAS extending agric services to project communities – Positive Deviant (PD) model as a way to cut down cost for scale up of good practices (e.g. saving) within communities
    10. 10. • Some final lessons learnt… – Graduation programs definitely require integration – It also requires genuine and coordinated actions – Some segments of target groups cannot graduate but require continuous support
    11. 11. Thank You!
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