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Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
Graduation programs   creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah
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Graduation programs creating ladders out of extreme poverty elizabeth naah

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  • GUP: Graduation from Ultra PovertySOUP: Savings Out of Poverty
  • GUP: Graduation from Ultra PovertySOUP: Savings Out of Poverty
  • Transcript

    • 1. Graduation Programs: Creating Ladders Out of Extreme Poverty October 9, 20113 By: Elizabeth Naah Implementation Coordinator, IPA Ghana
    • 2. • Context of poverty in Ghana • Over 40% people live on less than a dollar a-day • About 50% poor live in rural and deprived communities • Problems such as: poor feeding practices, poor sanitation, inadequate health care, lack of potable water etc. • Absence of government and NGO programs • Lack of collaboration between gov’t/NGOs frustrate implementers
    • 3. • The Pilot • Inspired by BRAC and promoted by CGAP/Ford as part of their global graduation program • Northern Ghana • Aim: moving ultra poor out of extreme poverty • 1,394 clients in 155 communities • Selection of “ultra poor”: participatory wealth ranking (PWR) • Provided services/products • The Partners • Presbyterian Agricultural Services (PAS)-local NGO • IPA, Ghana
    • 4. • Program goals • To move households from chronic extreme poverty into selfsufficiency • To develop sustainable livelihoods for the ultra poor • To graduate the Ultra poor to be able to participate in microfinance, if they so choose • Evaluate program components using RCT methodology • • • • Three districts 4000 households (1394 “treatment”) 30 field extension agents providing services to clients 24 months
    • 5. Evaluation design – Graduation from Ultra poverty (GUP) – 662 households • Transfer of assets for enterprise development (goats, pigs, poultry, processing equipment for Shea butter/ rice/ malt, farming inputs) • Enterprise development training and weekly coaching • Consumption support • National Health Insurance • Mobilization of savings (weekly; 50% of GUP) • Health/nutrition and finance education (weekly) – Savings Out of Ultra Poverty (SOUP) – 732 households • Mobilized savings (weekly) • One time finance training – Asset Only program – 131 households • One time dropping of 4 goats per client – Bag Add-ons program – 1200 households • Skills training • Materials for bag making • Paid a piece rate per bag sown
    • 6. • Evaluation still ongoing • Implementation achievements: Livestock assets Number of clients July 2011 July 2013 Goats 499 1969 4630 Hens 397 1589 3810 Pigs 24 48 650 – 1045 bank accounts opened with rural banks – ~95% of saving clients saved regularly – More than $50 saved per client; mobilization of over $48k savings – Provision of over $150k of consumption support
    • 7. • Key lessons learned: – How best to select ultra poor household - Full suite of PWR – Encourage certain good practices/behaviors - cultural practices should be carefully looked at and handled – Weekly debriefing meetings with field agents – Re-sensitization of community committees – Intensive monitoring
    • 8. • Key lessons learned Cont. – Transparent and solid finance systems is essential – Clients increased their participation in community gatherings/decision making – Continuous dialoging with Government/NGOs would help. – Link graduation programs with Safety net programs – Proper exiting is important
    • 9. • Next steps: – Plan and discussion underway to provide money boxes to savings clients – Some rural banks have opened new branches – The rural banks started re-sensitization on savings – IPA plans to expand depending on evaluation results – PAS extending agric services to project communities – Positive Deviant (PD) model as a way to cut down cost for scale up of good practices (e.g. saving) within communities
    • 10. • Some final lessons learnt… – Graduation programs definitely require integration – It also requires genuine and coordinated actions – Some segments of target groups cannot graduate but require continuous support
    • 11. Thank You!

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