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AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)
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AMERMS Workshop 22: Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth (PPT by Barbara Mirembe)

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FULL TITLE:
Creating Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth to Prevent Destructive Behaviors
ROOM: Impala/Lake Turkana
PANEL:
Panelist: Dr. Wahome Gakuru, Director - Marketing, Policy & Advocacy, Equity Bank, Kenya
Panelist: Ms. Barbara Mirembe, Manager, Training & Material Development, BRAC Uganda, Uganda
Panelist: Mr. Hopewell Zheke, Project Manager – STRIVE/OVC, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe

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  • 1. Creating Sustainable Livelihoods for Youth The BRAC Uganda Experience Barbara Mirembe Manager, Training and Material Development Empowerment and Livelihood for Adolescents
  • 2. Youth Demographic in Uganda <ul><li>35% of Uganda’s population:10-24 years </li></ul><ul><li>48% do not complete primary education </li></ul><ul><li>BRAC Research: Adolescent girls in Uganda are most vulnerable in the region </li></ul>School drop-out 28% Married Adolescents 10% Pregnant (current/past) 12% Sexual Activity (before 15) 33% Sexual Abuse 18% Strong need for Credit, Savings and Livelihood support
  • 3. BRAC Uganda Youth Programs <ul><li>ELA: Empowerment & Livelihoods for Adolescents </li></ul><ul><li>46,000+ young women borrowers in the mainstream microfinance program </li></ul>
  • 4. Empowering Adolescent Girls through ELA <ul><ul><ul><li>Safe spaces for gathering and learning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Community outreach, awareness, facilitation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Life-skill training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Financial literacy training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Income-generation skill training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Microfinance </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 5. Growth of ELA in Uganda <ul><li>Leverages 15 years of experience working with adolescent girls in Bangladesh </li></ul><ul><li>BRAC Uganda ELA Program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dec 2007: Pilot launched with support from Nike Foundation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aug 2008: 100 clubs operational - empowering 2500 girls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feb 2010: 500 clubs being run under the program, touching the lives of 15,350+ girls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dec 2010: Targeted to reach more than 21,000 girls </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. Life-cycle of Adolescent Girls in ELA Livelihood Training
  • 7. Financial Literacy Training <ul><li>Key Components of the training include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Savings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Budgeting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Financial Institutions and services offered </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Negotiating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Income Generation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Basic Accounting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer Care </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Financial Literacy training compulsory before girls can receive microloans </li></ul><ul><li>Over time, BRAC plans to train all ELA members in Financial Literacy </li></ul>
  • 8. Livelihood Training <ul><li>Analyze the market, and Understand the needs of Adolescent girls </li></ul><ul><li>Identify key livelihood opportunities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agriculture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Poultry & Livestock </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hairdressing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tailoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Catering Services </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Training provided through locally available trainers and mentorship with existing small-business owners </li></ul>
  • 9. Youth Microfinance <ul><li>Group Loans – duplicates BRAC’s mainstream microfinance approach </li></ul><ul><li>Lower average loan size: $75 (vs. $210) </li></ul><ul><li>Linking Financial literacy, Livelihood training and microfinance loans – holistic approach </li></ul><ul><li>Feb 2010: 800 borrowers have accessed credit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>saloon, grocery shops, food selling, clothes and shoes selling. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Dec 2010: Targeted to reach 8,000 borrowers </li></ul>
  • 10. Impact of the program <ul><li>High rate of participation in the clubs </li></ul><ul><li>Zero defaults till date (although small) </li></ul><ul><li>Randomized evaluation of ELA Program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Research team in partnership with World Bank and LSE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Baseline: November 2008 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mid-term Assessment in March 2010 and Repeat survey in 2011 </li></ul></ul>
  • 11. THANK YOU

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