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Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”
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Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning”

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Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning” will engage participants in creating a graduation …

Rise to the Challenge: Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning” will engage participants in creating a graduation project in any school setting.

Presented at AASL National Conference, October 2011

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • BEFORE VIDEO?Start by going around and introductionsName, Position, Where you are from, What is your experience with graduation project.
  • What you have just seen is a selection of Graduation Project presentations done by senior students at City Charter High School in Pittsburgh, PA.Hi, I’m Michelle Fossum and I’m Linda Savido. We are Research Teachers at City High, which has developed a High Stakes Graduation project that all students must complete in order to graduate from City High. Educators, legislators, parents have all been looking at strategies that can reform and improve the high school experience to ensure that students leave 12th grade with the skills necessary to find in success in the workforce, in post-high school education and in society. We believe that City High’s grad project is an essential experience for our seniors to find that success.Today we are going to provide you with an overview of City High’s Graduation Project, look at the research behind the introduction of capstone projects and give you some tips on creating or revamping senior project programs at your school.
  • [brochure]The Senior Graduation Project at City High has been designed to weave together a deep exploration of an area of student interest with the research and technological skills that they have developed during their high school years. Successful completion of all Graduation Project course requirements is necessary for gaining a City High diploma. There are 4 Basic Components:Oral Presentation, which you saw at the beginning of the presentation Written component, referred to as the Literature Review, demonstrating expertise on topic Technological component, website that acts as an electronic portfolio of all student work on the projectActive learning component, developed through an action plan that ends in a tangible product or performance topic selection of student choice (explain problematic topics)Lit reviewProject/activity developed through an action plan Website documenting all pieces tied into City High’s technology curriculumPresentation before a community panel Topics are self-selected, but can be veteoed - GIVE EXAMPLES OF current topics … Later in the presentation we will be discussing some issues that may arise from certain topics.The Graduation Project at City High is a 2-year process, beginning during one-trimester of a student’s Junior Year. The development of the program is a capstone not only of the student’s education at City High, but also of the Research curriculum that is unique to our school. In order to understand the significance of the Grad Project in the context of our school, we will now give you an overview of our school and our research program.
  • The video you just saw was a Graduation Project of one of our seniors, who researched _______________ . This video is used on our website and was also part of the students application portfolio for NYU’s Film School.City High
  • Celebrating 10 years, City Charter has been very successful in educating students from Pittsburgh public schools and the surrounding areas.We are a year-round school, with 3 trimesters, and our extended school day is organized by block scheduling. Teacher loop with their students, meaning we have the same students 9th through 12th grade.Beginning in January 2012, our senior schedule will be based on Independent Learning format, with seminar-style classes and students having individual study cubicles for independent work which will be scheduled throughout the day.Each City High student takes technology courses leading to Microsoft Office certifications, and each student has the opportunity for a one-trimester long Internship experience in which they spend half of their day at an Internship site based on their interest and skill set. Each student is issued a laptop upon entering 9th grade, which they take with them upon graduation.City High students also can participate in Chorus, an annual play, a student-run Art Show, a Robotics club and many other opportunities for extracurricular participation.Demographically, City High is approximately 56% minority and 60% eligible for free/reduced price lunch/11% special education – we are a full inclusion school. We will talk later about how our special education students have done with the Graduation ProjectWe have a 99% attendance rate, a 99% graduation rate and 85% of our students go to a 2-4 year college or training program. We have 2 full-time Transition Managers who assist students in their high school planning.2012 Top Ten Most Connected High Schools (US News and World Report)2010 America’s Best High Schools Bronze Award (US News and World Report)2009 EPIC Grant Winner (New Leaders for New Schools)
  • City High operates around 6 core beliefs. Eahc of these beliefs are instrumental in guiding the Graduation Project:Individual responsibility for learning.Students work independently on their projects and are monitored by check-ins from the teacher.Continuous challenge.The project is meant to constitute a learning stretch for the student and engage all areas of academic focus (reading, writing, verbal skills, mathematics)Connections to the real world. Student projects must have a tangible product that engages them with the real world.Personal Academic Connections. Students rely on teachers, and other mentors to support their projects.Safe and caring environment. Multiple teachers provide support throughout the project. Peer groups give feedback and support. Teachers loop with students, so we have built strong relationshipsCollaboration. Through feedback, peer-editing groups and cross-curricular project, students work together.
  • - From Charter: “an integrated and interdisciplinary activity wherestudents take the skills and knowledge learned in the other content areas andapply them to a research project.”- Teachers :(3 Library Science certified, 1 certified English/Social Studies) – but we are working on her !
  • PA Standards Reading/Writing/Speaking1.2. Reading Critically in All Content Areas1.4. Types of Writing1.5. Quality of Writing1.6. Speaking and Listening 1.8. ResearchInformation LiteracyStandard 1: The student who is information literate accesses information efficiently and effectively.Standard 2: The student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently.Standard 3: The student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively.National Educational Technology Standards3. Technology Productivity toolsStudents use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.Students use productivity tools to collaborate in constructing technology-enhanced models, prepare publications, and produce other creative works.4. Technology communications toolsStudents use telecommunications to collaborate, punish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences.Students use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences.5. Technology research tools Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources. Students use technology tools to process data and report results. Students evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks. 6. Technology problem-solving and decision-making tools Students use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions. Students employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world.
  • Can refer to scope and sequence.
  • Examples of notes
  • Examples of final papers.
  • Show examplesKayleigh, Alyssa, Jess A
  • Describe problems (“documentary”)Give examples[VIDEO]
  • {Have rubric}
  • City High is implementing a model for Senior Independent Learning. It deconstructs the classroom experience into a variety of learning experiences that seniors will participate in (teacher-directed seminar, independent learning time, lecture and peer groups) This is a reflection of how Grad Project has always been run, and now all other content areas will reflect this.For grad project, students will meet in a seminar group once a week for general information, as well as when I will assess their progress, The rest of the week students will be working independently during their “Quiet Room” time. Students also will be participating in peer groups set up by the teacher to work together on peer-editing papers, getting peer help on websites, practicing presentations, etc.
  • City High is implementing a model for Senior Independent Learning. It deconstructs the classroom experience into a variety of learning experiences that seniors will participate in (teacher-directed seminar, independent learning time, lecture and peer groups) This is a reflection of how Grad Project has always been run, and now all other content areas will reflect this.For grad project, students will meet in a seminar group once a week for general information, as well as when I will assess their progress, The rest of the week students will be working independently during their “Quiet Room” time. Students also will be participating in peer groups set up by the teacher to work together on peer-editing papers, getting peer help on websites, practicing presentations, etc.
  • Independent Learning Rubric
  • Independent Learning Rubric
  • Our program is still in development and each year, especially due to looping, we discover something new:Need to have an archive procedureAward to bring recognition to excellent grad projects – Gemma Glass, grants, funding, Students at City High have many opportunities to complete response-type essays but less practice with informational writing.
  • IN PROGRESS 23-35Now that we elaborated on City High’s Graduation Project, we would like to give you some background on why it is important for schools to implement a Senior Project program.
  • SERVE, Senior ProgrectProgram began in 1994 South Eastern Regional Vision for Education, federally funded100 high schools used program by 2000, mainly in Southeast improve time-management, writing, research, speakingResearch indicated value of senior project often appreciated after high school was over and students were in the real world (2000 study)Enrichment Triad Model – opportunities to conduct independent research
  • North Carolina’s Senior Project – 3 R’s Emily Sullivan Brandenburg’s master thesis (2005) compiled data based on SERVE’s SPP:Rigor – as projects became more rigorous, often a backlash; however, students reported an increase in proficiencyRelevance – importance of real world connections to workplace, college, societyRelationships – building of relationships with mentors, “managers”
  • indicated in 2000 SERVE study
  • indicated in 2000 SERVE study
  • indicated in 2000 SERVE study
  • As you develop or redesign your school’s project, consider the following issues:TopicsAssessmentDocumentationIndependent LearningPanelistsSpecial NeedsScheduling
  • ** controversial issuesMay want to restrict to career choices, service learningSome topics too broad (child abuse, for example). Others are difficult to develop an action plan for (video game addiction)
  • Worksheet [need copies of this]
  • Transcript

    • 1. Rise to the Challenge:Creating a High-Stakes Graduation Project Program to Demonstrate Excellence in Information Literacy and Independent Learning Michelle Fossum & Linda Savido. City Charter High School, Pittsburgh PA www.cityhigh.org
    • 2. SENIOR GRAD PROJECT @ City High• Requirement for Graduation from City High• 4 Major Components – Oral component (Presentation) – Written component (Literature Review) – Technological component (Website) – Active component (Project/activity)• Students self-select topic based on interest, hobby, career path
    • 3. City Charter High School
    • 4. City High Core Beliefs• Individual responsibility for learning.• Continuous challenge.• Connections to the real world.• Personal Academic Connections.• Safe and caring environment.• Collaboration.
    • 5. RESEARCH @ CITY HIGH The Research class will be “an integrated and interdisciplinary activitywhere students take the skills and knowledge learned in the other content areas and apply them to a research project.” City Charter High School Charter Application, November 2001
    • 6. Research @ City High• 4 Research Teachers• Grades 9/10: – Research classes taught by certified Research teachers – Research skill development – Ground research in topics from curriculum areas• Grades 11/12: – Design, research and execute a Graduation Project – Research teacher = “Project Manager”
    • 7. Research Standards @ City High– PA Standards of Reading/Writing/Speaking– AASL: Information Literacy Standards– National Education Technology Standards
    • 8. Research 9/10Research 9 Research 10• 2 hr. block • 2 hr. block• Team-taught by two • Team-taught by two Research teachers Research teachers• General research process • Research skills practiced skills introduced and and perfected practiced • Content based on• Focus on connection with Epidemiology/The Hot Zone Cultural Literacy classes • Focus on connection with (English/Social Studies) Science and Math classes
    • 9. Research Process• Defining • Organizing – Questioning strategies – Note-taking• Locating – Citations – Types of sources – Paraphrasing/using direct quotes (primary/secondary) – Outlining – Online searching strategies • Creating – Accessing/using databases – Visual presentations• Selecting – Websites – Website evaluation – Action plan development – Written research papers – Presentation technique • Evaluating – Editing work – Self and peer evaluations
    • 10. GRAD PROJECT
    • 11. 11th Grade Background• Area of interest Research • Proposal• Prior knowledge • Timeline • Notes• Self-selected vs. Teacher-directed • Interview• Create Letter of Intent • Annotated Bibliography • Outline Action Plan Topic Selection Development
    • 12. 12th Grade Oral Website• Rough Draft • Documentation Presentation• Peer-edit • Timeline followed • FAQs • Powerpoint• Self-edit • Sources • Dramatic introduction• Teacher edit • Multimedia • Use of multimedia• Works Cited • Multiple practices Literature Project Review Execution
    • 13. Topic Selection• 2 week period• Brainstorming sessions• Online browsing• Topic development activities• Current Events• LETTER OF INTENT – Approved, Not Approved, Not There Yet
    • 14. Essential/Foundation Questions
    • 15. GOAL: Literature Review• Questioning strategies• Note-taking• Creating Questions• Documenting Sources• Outlining Graduation Project• Research writing• Editing (Grades 11-12) • Foundation Questions 10th Grade • Notes • Disease • Annotated Bibliography Project • Literature Review • Debate 9th Grade • Pittsburgh Places • Decades
    • 16. Background ResearchSources – 13+ sources total • 1+ book • 1+ interview • 1+ primary source (chart, data, video, etc.) • 10+ websites – 3 sources per foundation/research questionNotes – 8+ research questions developed by student – 10+ detailed notes per question
    • 17. Literature Review Requirements– At least one paragraph per research question– In-text citation throughout– Strong introduction– Emphasis on “objective” research writing and elimination of 1st person subjective writing
    • 18. GOAL: Website• Technology curriculum givesbackground in multimedia,Photoshop, Dreamweaver• Use of technology infusedthroughout all areas ofcurriculum Graduation Project• Students create blogs todocument progress (Grades 11-12) • Blogging progress 10th Grade • Development of • Disease Electronic Portfolio websites • Grad Project Website • Powerpoint 9th Grade on Hot Zone background • Decades • Independent Project
    • 19. Website Requirements– Document all sources used in project– Highlight use of multimedia– Present research in form of FAQ’s– Demonstrate proficiency in use of technology
    • 20. GOAL: Action Component• Development of action plans Graduation Project (Grades 11-12) 10th Grade • Action Plan • Emergency Timeline Preparedness Plan • Action Plan • Public Service Proposal Announcement • Execution of Action Plan
    • 21. Action Plan Development• “Active learning”• Learn a new skill, develop a program, participate with an organization• Can be developed through internship experience• All aspects must be documented
    • 22. Action Plan ExamplesResearch Topic ProductWeb Design Created YouTube tutorials on how to use Dreamweaver to create a websiteImportance of physical education in Organized a Field Day to promoteschools physical activity in youthPublic art Design and create a mural in a local coffee shopDepression in teens Write and perform a monologue at student Art Show about a teen suffering from depression
    • 23. Action Plan Assessment• Flexible rubric to allow for different types of projects• Looks at 3 components: – Planning – Execution – Impact/Effect
    • 24. GOAL: Oral Presentation• Presentation techniques• Public speaking skills Graduation Project (Grades 11-12) • 11th Grade Action Plan 10th Grade Proposal Presentation • Debate • Final Oral Presentation for outside panel 9th Grade • Independent Project Presentation
    • 25. Oral Presentations - Content• 20-30 minute presentation with time for questions• Highlighting multimedia aspects of project• Demonstrates content knowledge and documentation of product
    • 26. Oral Presentations - Management• 3-5 panelists per presentations• Panelists compiled through Internship office• Afternoons during Final Exam days
    • 27. CITY HIGHGRADUATION PROJECTS
    • 28. Staffing• 1 Research Teacher• 1 Technology teacher• 1 support staff (Research teacher, Teaching Associate, or Special Education teacher)
    • 29. Independent Learning• 12th Grade Independent Learning model• Weekly Progress grades• Independent Learning rubric
    • 30. Assessment• Oral Presentation (20%)• Literature Review (20%)• Website/Electronic Portfolio (20%)• Action Plan/Tangible Product (10%)• Weekly Progress (20%)• Project Reflections (5%)• 11th Grade Final Grade (5%)
    • 31. Assessment issues• Final grade > 70%• Attendance issues• Failing grades will retake class following year until relevant areas are proficient
    • 32. Next Steps• Archive presentations/student work• Awards to recognize excellence• New Senior Year model – can students complete their project in 1-3 trimesters?• Improve quality of informational writing
    • 33. IT IS A MIRACLE THATCURIOSITY SURVIVES FORMAL EDUCATION.
    • 34. Rethinking Senior YearThe “primary goal of high schools should be graduating students who are ready (and eager) to learn more, capable of thinking critically, and comfortable with the ambiguities of the problem-solving process.” National Commission on the High School Senior Year, 2001
    • 35. Senior Project Development• 1994: SERVE, Senior Project Program – Multiple studies (1998-2000) indicated effectiveness of program• 2001: National Commission on the High School Senior Year• Gifted Programs, Enrichment Triad Model (Renzulli)• Senior Project Center (www.seniorproject.net)
    • 36. Increasing Use of Senior Projects• Over 25 states require a culminating project• Often alternatives to exit exams• PA State Board of Education Each school district, including charter schools, shall specify requirements for graduation in their strategic plan. Requirements shall include course completion and grades, completion of a Culminating Project, and results of local assessments aligned with the academic standards. The purpose of the culminating project is to assure that students are able to apply, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information and communicate significant knowledge and understanding.
    • 37. Senior Projects - Rationale• 3 R’s of Education: “Rigor, relevance, relationships”• Demonstrate proficiency in written, verbal, research skills• Combat “senioritis” through engagement in self- selected project• Improve student resiliency through long-term planning and execution of project• Importance of Active Learning - Learning by doing
    • 38. Best PracticesBased on research and implementation at City High, an effective Graduation Project program should:• Make the LMS (Teacher-Librarian) and essential part of the project• Evaluate essential high school goals – Time management – Writing – Research – Public speaking
    • 39. Best PracticesBased on research and implementation at City High, an effective Graduation Project program should:• Be mandatory for all students of all levels• Be described on transcript and available for college admissions/potential employers• Use rubrics to ensure consistency in assessment• Incorporate balance in project components so all students can find success
    • 40. Best PracticesBased on research and implementation at City High, an effective Graduation Project program should:• Be supported by all school stakeholders• Incorporate faculty and staff members from all disciplines, especially technology support• Integrate mentors/community members• Include documentation of student’s process
    • 41. DESIGNING YOURGRADUATION PROJECT PROGRAM
    • 42. Topics• Controversial issues• Career/service learning• Not too broad or too narrow• Can be developed into an action plan
    • 43. Scheduling• Structure: 1 – 4 years• Class time: Independent or part of a core subject area• Staffing – LMS – English/Social Studies teacher• Stand-alone course – can use Web 2.0 tools for asynchronous learning• Independent Learning – in class or scheduled library time
    • 44. Assessment• Rubrics• Pass/fail• High-stakes/low-stakes• Individual grade or part of another course• Use of outside evaluators
    • 45. Documentation• Documentation of action plan• Use of multimedia
    • 46. Independent Learning• Keeping track• Use of rubrics
    • 47. Panelists• Maintain current contact list• Community members• Retired teachers• Teachers from other grade level teams
    • 48. Students with Special Needs• Research at ability level• Able to engage in a topic of interest• Technology aspects
    • 49. TIME TO DESIGN YOUR OWN! https://sites.google.com/site/cityhighgraduationproject/ http://bit.ly/cityhighgp
    • 50. Works CitedBrandenburg, Emily S. "Senior Project - Getting Back to the 3 Rs: Rigor, Relevance and Relationships." Thesis. University of North Carolina Wilmington, 2005. Web. 9 Sept. 2011. <libres.uncg.edu/ir/uncw/f/bradenburge2005-1.pdf>.City High Graduation Project. City Charter High School, 2011. Web. <https://sites.google.com/site/cityhighgraduationproject/>.O’Sullivan, Michael K. and Kim B Dallas. “A Collaborative approach to implementing 21st Century skills in a High school senior research class.” Education Libraries 33.1 (2010) : 3-9.Renzulli, Joseph S., and Sally M. Reis. "Schoolwide Enrichment Model." Neag Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development. University of Connecticut. Web. 2 Oct. 2011. <http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/sem/semexec.html>.Senior Project Center. Partnership for Dynamic Learning, Inc., 2011. Web. 1 Sept. 2011. <http://www.seniorproject.net/>.Shaunessy, Elizabeth. "The Senior Project and Gifted Education." Gifted Child Today 27.3 (2004): 38-51. Print. Compiled by Michelle Fossum and Linda Savido, City Charter High School www.cityhigh.org Bit.ly/cityhighgp

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