Action painting

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background information for IB Juniors action painting unit

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  • Action painting

    1. 1. ACTION PAINTING
    2. 2. • In AbstractExpressionism an artist no longer started with an image in mind rather he began with his media with intent of interacting with the surface. The resulting image was the result of this act.
    3. 3. • Many times the only thing these artists had in common was the movement of the artist’s body• Abstractionallowed artists to explore psychology and subjective states of mind and they were free to experiment without the need for the public’s understanding or approval.
    4. 4. Jackson Pollack
    5. 5. Helen Frankenthaler
    6. 6. Wols
    7. 7. Kazuo Shiraga
    8. 8. ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM AND POLITICS• modernism brought about artist’s independence from political manipulation• howeversome critics said that its inaccessibility meant that it had no meaningful social purpose• how could this art push boundaries and evoke social change if it was not understood?
    9. 9. • ofcourse any piece of art is a direct reflection of established philosophies, belief systems, and ideological loyalties• canart or an artist ever be truly independent of its time and place?
    10. 10. • critics have said that American Abstract Expressionism and American foreign policy during the Cold War went well together since an artist achieving freedom and individuality was essentially a nationalistic act, honoring a country that tolerated freedom and individuality
    11. 11. • Abstract Expressionist paintings were portrayed as free from the actual economic and political life in the Cold War and a symbol of a free, creative cultural practice, characteristic of a free America standing up against the threat of the Soviet Union.• questions exist as to whether this was intentional or even if the artists were aware of what their art was portrayed as
    12. 12. • differences in critics opinions reinforce the view that these works of art do not intentionally embody political or idealogical content• like any object that we study, they are open to the interpretation of those observing it
    13. 13. SOURCES• Harold Rosenberg, “The American Action Painters” from Tradition of the New, originally in Art News 51.8, Dec. 1952 p.22• “ActionPainting: Perspectives from Two Sides of the Atlantic” Review by: Gail Levin Art Journal, Vol. 67, No. 4 (winter 2008), pp.119-121 Published by: College Art Association• DavidCraven, Abstract Expressionism as Cultural Critique: Dissent During the McCarthy Period. 232 pp., illus., bibl, Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999

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