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    Integrative project 2010 Integrative project 2010 Document Transcript

    • Integrative Project 1Running Head: INTEGRATIVE PROJECT Integrative Project: Creating and Implementing an Original Faculty Manual at XYZ University By Michael Smith A Project Presented in Fulfillment Of the Requirements of ED5990 Integrative Project Capella University Winter Quarter 2010 Professor Dionne Felix
    • Integrative Project 2 AbstractMost postsecondary institutions have some basic handbook for their faculty members to read andconsult when teaching classes for them. What happens when a manual of this nature simply doesnot exist? At XYZ University, that scenario was a reality. The manual did not exist because thecampus was brand new and no one had created one. This project strives to develop andimplement a faculty manual for this startup campus. What policies and procedures should go inthis manual? Those questions will be answered, and this project will become a useful resourcefor administrators and faculty who need to create an original manual or update existing manualsat their institutions.
    • Integrative Project 3 Table of ContentsTopic Selection & Rationale ........................................................................................................... 4Project Scope .................................................................................................................................. 5Ethical Considerations .................................................................................................................... 7Leadership Aspects ......................................................................................................................... 7Learning Objectives & Methods ..................................................................................................... 8Key Components ........................................................................................................................... 10Project Outline .............................................................................................................................. 13Faculty Manual ............................................................................................................................. 23
    • Integrative Project 4 Topic Selection & Rationale The topic I chose for my Integrative Project is creating a faculty policy manual at XYZUniversitys startup campus where I am the Director of Education. I chose this topic because ourstartup campus currently does not have a faculty policy manual. Without it, faculty are literallyon different pages in terms of college procedures that either exist somewhere else within theinstitution, or should exist but have not been articulated and distributed to all faculty. This topic is of interest to me because I clearly see that the faculty members are operatingway under their potential without a policy manual. There is a big communication breakdownright now that could easily be fixed with a policy manual. As Director of Education, my scope ofauthority includes faculty in all aspects, and it is expected that I distribute a manual of this type. Iam in a position to create this manual, or better yet, use a team approach and get their assistancein creating one, which will give them a sense of ownership in the policies within the manual. I have been with XYZ University since February 2005 and know the companys policies,ACICS accreditation guidelines, and state regulations. I have also served in multiple roles atXYZ University, including adjunct instructor, department head, Learning Resource CenterCoordinator, and Associate Dean, and can use those experiences to analyze any policy we put inthe manual to make sure it works for all parties at the campus, and all agencies we answer to. Ican also reach out to other directors at branch campuses to see their manuals and get their inputon what works and what doesnt work, and make valuable connections in the process. Ive alsobeen a Capella learner since 2007, and memorable courses like Higher Ed & the Law and HigherEd Assessment allow me to not only speak to those areas of our industry, such as FERPA, butalso create and design tools such as electronic grade books.
    • Integrative Project 5 When I left my previous campus, we had 700 students, 60 faculty, and all of the positionswere filled. Here, we have 100 students, just 13 adjunct instructors, and havent hired for anypositions. I am interested in studying about other startup campuses in higher education to see ifwe are unique in the way we have started up. In terms of how this will impact the faculty policymanual, it will affect the reporting structure that should be outlined. An adjunct instructortypically reports first to a department head. We have hired no department heads, and there are noplans to do so at this time, so all adjuncts report directly to me. There will be many of thosedetails in the policy manual that will separate us from the bigger campuses within our enterprise,and it is for that reason I think the policy manual should be a fluid, living document. Articulating these kinds of things is something that is commonly overlooked byindividuals and organizations. Either people assume that someone else is taking care of it, or thatthere is a policy somewhere, or people just make a judgment call. Changes in personnel,particularly at the leadership level, have a tendency to make these things slip through the cracks.When the communication breaks down long enough, the result is chaos. Studying this topic, andcreating the policy manual, can benefit me, my profession, and the institution in many ways. Ivenever created a campus-wide faculty policy manual, and thats very exciting for me as anadministrator. I also see faculty who want leadership right now, and need policies in place. Thisis also something I could take with me wherever I go and adapt to fit other academicdepartments, which again, is very exciting for me personally and professionally. Project Scope This project strives to create the first professional faculty policy manual at the XYZUniversity campus, which is a startup campus part of a larger career college enterprise consistingof 24 total schools. Faculty members at this seven-month-old campus have not used any
    • Integrative Project 6professionally sanctioned manuals for XYZ University policies. This manual would be availableto faculty in print and electronic forms through the institution’s secure server. The scope of the project is broad, and includes the creation and implementation of thefaculty policy manual at the campus level because one currently does not exist. It also includespresenting a proposal to corporate leadership describing the Director of Education’s intention tocreate the manual, and will outline his methods for doing so. The proposal would also describethe details of the manual’s contents. The manual would highlight company policies,accreditation guidelines, FERPA guidelines, state regulations, and professional standards. Theseendeavors would be achieved in two ways: (a) They would be achieved by including keydocuments in an appendix section and highlighting key sections for faculty reference; (b) Theywould be achieved by including campus-specific reporting structures and faculty procedures withthe use of visual organizational charts, written job descriptions, and explanations to accompanyeach job description. Most important, corporate leadership would understand preliminary research gathered bythe Director of Education in creating the faculty manual. By way of example, Paradise ValleyCommunity College would be used because its handbook is available to faculty in the form of anAdobe Reader file on the institution’s unsecured document server. The handbook offers a mapof the college, a faculty checklist, and an in-depth alphabetized table of contents. At 83 pages, itis an impressive handbook, although much of what the handbook covers is not directly faculty-related; some of it is student services or disabilities (“Adjunct Faculty Handbook,” 2009). The University of Colorado has made its faculty handbook available electronically to thepublic in an easy-to-navigate website. It includes information on the university structure, facultygovernance, faculty roles, policies, responsibilities, compensation, and benefits (“Faculty
    • Integrative Project 7Handbook,” 2009). Pellissippi State Technical Community College, on the other hand, is muchmore interactive and faculty-friendly. From their instructional programs page, one can accessthe Adjunct Faculty Handbook in pdf format, view all of the college’s academic departments,access the college calendar, scan through the college catalog, and visit Human Resources(“Adjunct Faculty,” 2009). This site is a model for the electronic format because of thenavigation and the content presented. Ethical Considerations Ethics must always be considered and addressed in a project such as this and in anenvironment such as the career college sector of higher education. Some ethical considerationsinclude ownership and security. Regarding ownership, the Director of Education would make itclear in the proposal that although he authored the manual in large part, other factors must beconsidered as well. For instance, many of the documents and policies used in the manual are theproperty of XYZ University or other agencies such as the United States Department ofEducation. Moreover, while the Director of Education will be responsible for the creation of themanual, he would be creating it specifically for XYZ University, with the audience being thefaculty members at the particular startup campus. Leadership Aspects I would outline clear rationales and objectives. For example, a team approach withfaculty will be crucial and will be achieved through regular meetings and delegatedresponsibilities. Faculty will look to the Director of Education for guidance and leadershipaspects throughout this project. Not only does the project create leaders in the entire faculty, italso qualifies for professional development across the board. After the project, I wouldrecognize faculty at the XYZ Fund, which is the enterprise’s development resource that hosts
    • Integrative Project 8scholarships, golf retreats, and other activities for students, staff, and faculty throughout thecompany. Learning Objectives & MethodsThe objectives and methods are as follows: 1. To collaborate on the campuss first faculty policy manual using a team approach. Inorder to achieve this objective, I will use methods of collaboration and empowerment. I willmeet with faculty members first to announce and describe this project, and then ask for their helpin creating and implementing it campus-wide; 2. To implement standardization in faculty policies and procedures. In order to achievethis objective, I will use methods of standardization and research. Working with faculty, I willgather all forms and templates to ensure that we are using current and correct copies of ACICSdata sheets, professional development plans, and institutionally required syllabi; 3. To articulate the reporting structure between campus faculty and staff. In order toachieve this objective, I will use methods of communication and collaboration. Working withfaculty, staff, and administrators, I will develop what I think is the correct reporting structure,and meet with Human Resources to confirm before publishing it in the manual; 4. To outline policies on performance reviews, faculty payroll, academic freedom, andprofessional development. In order to achieve this objective, I will use methods of collaboration,standardization, and communication. Doing so will ensure that all applicable policies andprocedures are fully explained from a faculty perspective, and outlined for the needs of XYZUniversity. The objectives and methods include collaboration on the campuss first faculty policymanual using a team approach. Methods of collaboration, empowerment, and leadership will all
    • Integrative Project 9be key factors. These methods will be incorporated by meeting with faculty members todistribute and collect information, coaching faculty members individually and in group settings,and delegating shared responsibilities. Another important aspect of the project includesimplementing standardization in faculty policies and procedures. This will certainly be achievedby methods of standardization and research as both administrators and faculty gather all currentforms and templates, including ACICS data sheets, professional development plans, andinstitutionally required syllabi. The accreditation section will explain the importance of 100%compliance in the area of a faculty member’s file and will offer a checklist to ensure compliance.It will also explain what ACICS is, which documents are required, and how important thesethings are to the college. The Online Education Database provides information on XYZ University’s accreditationagency, the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools or ACICS, and alsoincludes other schools that are accredited by the agency (“Accrediting,” 2009). The officialACICS website provides resources for instructors, as well as administrators. Resources includecriteria, fees, and forms (“ACICS,” 2008). One area that must be articulated is the reportingstructure between campus faculty and staff. That will have to be done through methods ofcommunication, mentoring, and collaboration. Faculty and staff working collaboratively willfirst develop the correct reporting structure and then meet with Human Resources forconfirmation before the structure is published in the manual. Finally, faculty will work with school leadership to outline policies on performancereviews, faculty payroll, academic freedom, and professional development. In this final step,more methods of collaboration, standardization, and communication will be used to ensure thatall applicable policies and procedures are fully explained from a faculty perspective. In doing
    • Integrative Project 10so, faculty become empowered, and ensure that all policies and procedures are outlined for theneeds of their peers at XYZ University. Key Components The Pacific Institute is a curriculum that is part of the campus culture at XYZ University.“Success is the result of knowing where you want to go, and the changes you need to make to getthere” (“Home,” 2008). More than a self-help or life skills curriculum, faculty must understandand teach the material from a total immersion perspective as a new way of life for students whocome to XYZ seeking change. The manual will offer a brief guide on how to incorporate ThePacific Institute principles into all of the institution’s courses, and why it’s important to do so.Along those lines, it will be important for faculty to understand academic freedom. According to the American Association of University Professors, “Teachers are entitledto freedom in the classroom in discussing their subject, but they should be careful not tointroduce into their teaching controversial matter which has no relation to their subject” (“1940Statement,” n.d.). It is often important for faculty in career colleges to remember that curriculumshould apply to the careers that students are seeking at all times. Indeed, Jaschick (2007) recallsthat recent studies show “escalating attempts to silence and marginalize university teachers whoresist or challenge narrow black and white teaching” (Jaschick, 2007). In the for-profitenvironments such as XYZ University, however, it can be seen as a challenge to the untrainedEnglish instructor teaching a class with Medical Assisting students to focus the writing class onthe medical career until the instructor remembers what the student’s objective is. Student privacy is another concern that faculty must be sensitive to, and trained to handle.XYZ University works closely with the ADA when a student declares a disability. Faculty mustbe aware of this process, and know the policies associated with it. The College of William and
    • Integrative Project 11Mary (2010) provides public access to a form for students to declare a disability online using aweb-based form. The institution specifies that, “The College cannot provide accommodationsthat are not requested” (“Declaration,” 2010). The U.S. Department of Education Office ofCivil Rights reports that should a student want academic adjustments, he or she must identifyhim or herself as a disabled student in order to access appropriate facilities (“Students withDisabilities,” 2008). The reasons outlined in this project present just a few of the reasons why faculty must betrained on a continuous basis for best results. Each quarter, faculty members are required toattend at least one in-service session, and provide proof of their attendance. Proof can be in theform of a sign-in sheet, certificate, agenda, etc. The manual will discuss quarterly opportunities,why these opportunities are required, and where the documentation should be placed. Similar toquarterly in-service, faculty are required to provide evidence of professional development on acontinuing basis. This can be in the form of conferences in the instructor’s field, professionalsubscriptions, or work on an advanced degree. In-service and professional development will becompared and contrasted throughout. For instance, adjunct instructor Cathy Holloway Hill is a“certified Career and Life Coach, Author and Motivational Speaker” (“About Cathy,” 2008).She could use any number of her publications or speaking engagements as evidence ofprofessional growth throughout the academic year. When she attends a XYZ-sponsored sessionon grade book training, however, that would be applied toward in-service. Finally, it is important to understand that at this time XYZ University is made up entirelyof adjunct instructors, and buy-in could be difficult. Maistro (2009) wrote that adjuncts arecurrently among the most vulnerable workers in higher education, pointing to the lack of “equalpay for equal work; decent health and retirement benefits; job security; unemployment insurance;
    • Integrative Project 12and professional working conditions, including academic freedom.” Adjuncts at XYZ Universityare painfully aware of these realities, making any extra tasks like participation in a project suchas this seem that much more extra. To make it work, they have to see what’s in it for them;specifically, they have to see that things will be better with a manual, and this is their chance tohave a say in what goes in it.
    • Integrative Project 13 Project OutlineI. Introduction A. Overview Statement 1. To create the first professional faculty policy manual at the XYZ University campus 2. Faculty members have not used any professionally sanctioned manuals for XYZ University policies 3. Manual would be available to faculty in print and electronic forms via the institution’s secure serverII. Scope of Project A. To include 1. Creating and implementing the faculty policy manual at the campus level because one currently does not exist 2. Presenting a proposal to corporate leadership describing intention and details of manual i. Preliminary research a. Adjunct Faculty Handbook. (2009). Paradise Valley Community College, Retrieved January 27, 2010, from http://www.pvc.maricopa.edu/~afi/docs/handbook.pdf b. Adjunct Faculty Information & Handbook (2009). Pellissippi State Technical Community College, Retrieved February 3, 2010, from http://www.pstcc.edu/departments/ instruction/adjunct.html c. Faculty Handbook. (2009). University of Colorado, Retrieved January 25, 2010, from https://www.cu.edu/content/faculty-handbook d. Faculty Information (n.d.). Drury University, Retrieved February 6, 2010, from http://www.drury.edu/section/ section.cfm?sid=122 ii. Rationale iii. Objectives iv. Ethical considerations 3. Achieved through regular faculty meetings and delegated responsibilities
    • Integrative Project 14 i. Faculty will look to the Director of Education for guidance and leadership throughout this project b. Maistro, M. (2009). The Adjunct’s Moment of Truth. Retrieved February 5, 2010, from Inside Higher Ed at http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2009/09/10/maisto 4. The manual would highlight i. Company policies ii. ACICS accreditation guidelines iii. FERPA guidelines v. State regulations v. Professional standards 5. Achieved by i. Including the documents in an appendix section ii. Highlighting key sections for faculty reference 6. To include campus-specific reporting structures and faculty procedures i. Visual organizational charts ii. Written job descriptions iii. Explanations to accompany each job descriptionIII. Learning Objectives and Methods A. The objectives and methods are as follows 1. To collaborate on the campuss first faculty policy manual using a team approach i. Methods of collaboration, empowerment, and leadership ii. Meeting with faculty members to distribute and collect information iii. Coaching faculty members individually and in group settings iv. Delegation of shared responsibilities 2. To implement standardization in faculty policies and procedures i. Methods of standardization and research ii. Gathering of all current forms and templates a. ACICS data sheets b. Professional development plans c. XYZ required syllabi d. Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS). (2009). Online Education Database, Retrieved January 16, 2010, from http://oedb.org/accreditation- agencies/acics e. ACICS – Accreditation Resources. (2008). Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, Retrieved
    • Integrative Project 15 January 27, 2010, from http://www.acics.org/accreditation/ content.aspx?id=1884 3. To articulate the reporting structure between campus faculty and staff i. Methods of communication, mentoring, and collaboration ii. Develop the correct reporting structure iii. Meetings with Human Resources for confirmation before publication in manual 4. To outline policies on performance reviews, faculty payroll, academic freedom, and professional development i. Methods of collaboration, standardization, and communication ii. Ensure that all applicable policies and procedures are fully explained from a faculty perspective iii. Ensure all policies and procedures are outlined for the needs of XYZ UniversityIV. Table of Contents A. Section 1 – Calendars 1. Academic Calendar i. Quarter start dates ii. Quarter end dates iii. Holidays and breaks iv. Required in-service dates v. Important due dates 2. Master Calendar i. Enterprise-wide master calendar ii. All-schools meeting dates iii. Corporate events B. Section 2 – Reporting Structure. 1. Visual Organization Charts i. Hierarchy ii. Example: Adjunct—Full-time—Lead—DOE—Campus Director iii. Charts will be based on existing company hierarchy iv. Meetings will be organized with Human Resources to confirm v. These charts will be created in a graphic design computer program vi. No other graphs or charts will be used 2. Job Descriptions i. Written ii. Visual
    • Integrative Project 16 iii. FAQ 3. Expectations i. Specific duties ii. New hire section iii. Conflict resolution iv. Contract explanation v. Absences and substitutions vi. Pay issuesC. Section 3 – Statements Explained 1. Purpose i. Why manual exists 2. The Pacific Institute i. Curriculum ii. Lou Tice iii. Total Immersion iv. Home (2008). The Pacific Institute, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.thepacificinstitute.us/v2/D. Section 4 – Technology 1. Usernames & Passwords i. CampusVue ii. Attendance iii. Rosters iv. Faculty portal v. Contact Manager vi Grade books vii. Final Grades 2. Problems i. Help DeskE. Section 5 – Accreditation 1. Faculty files i. Checklist 2. ACICS i. Highlighted sections ii. Submission dates and instructions
    • Integrative Project 17 iii. Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS). (2009). Online Education Database, Retrieved January 16, 2010, from http://oedb.org/accreditation-agencies/acics iv. ACICS – Accreditation Resources. (2008). Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, Retrieved January 27, 2010, from http://www.acics.org/accreditation/content.aspx?id=1884 3. Data Sheet i. Highlighted sections ii. Submission dates and instructions 4. Faculty Development Plan i. Highlighted sections ii. Submission dates and instructions 5. Syllabi i. Template ii. SuggestionsG. Section 6 – Policies 1. Academic Freedom i. What is it? ii. 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure. (n.d.). American Association of University Professors, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/ pubsres/policydocs/contents/1940statement.htm iii. Jaschick, S. (2007). Strategies on Academic Freedom. Retrieved February 2, 2010, from Inside Higher Ed at http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/01/15/freedom 2. Inclement Weather i. Official policy 3. Dress Code i. Employees ii. Students 4. FERPA i. What is it? ii. What to do? iii. Who to call? iv. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). U.S. Department of Education, Retrieved January 28, 2010, from http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa
    • Integrative Project 18 5. Veterans Affairs i. About VA. (2009). United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.va.gov/landing2_about.htm 6. Americans with Disabilities i. Declaration of Disability. (2010). The College of William & Mary, Retrieved January 26, 2010, from http://www.wm.edu/offices/ deanofstudents/forms/disability/index.php ii. Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education. (2008). U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights, Retrieved February 6, 2010, from http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transition.html iii. The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy. (2008). The College of New Jersey, Retrieved February 6, 2010, from http://www.tcnj.edu/~affirm/ada.htmlH. Section 7 – Scheduling & Registration 1. Registrar’s Office i. Student schedules ii. Name on rosterI. Section 8 – Textbooks 1. Financial Aid i. FAFSA ii. FAFSA – Free Application for Federal Student Aid. (2010). Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/ 2. Current Textbook List 3. Revision Requests 4. Refund Policies 5. Textbook Evaluation FormJ. Section 9 – Required Meetings 1. Quarterly In-Service i. Evidence of attendance ii. About Cathy (2008). C. Holloway Hill Enterprises, Retrieved January 31, 2010, from http://chollowayhill.com/about.htm
    • Integrative Project 19 iii. Brooks, B. (2010). Keeping Them Engaged Faculty Development Seminar, Retrieved January 31, 2010, from http://www.keepingthemengaged.com 2. Professional Development i. Sessions TBA ii. Outside session FAQ iii. Qualifications iv. Evidence of development K. Section 10 – Appendix 1. Forms L. Section 11 – Acknowledgement 1. Submit signed receipt to DOEV. Description of Sections A. Section 1 – Calendars 1. This section will display the current academic calendar, which will present quarter start dates, quarter end dates, holidays, breaks, required in-service dates, and important due dates. It will also provide the enterprise-wide master calendar that allows faculty access to all-schools meeting dates and information about corporate events. B. Section 2 – Reporting Structure. 1. This section will offer visual organization charts that describe the college’s hierarchy or reporting structure. Charts will be based on existing company hierarchy and will be confirmed by Human Resources prior to publication in the faculty manual. These charts will be created in a graphic design computer program. 2. Written job descriptions will also accompany these visual charts and will offer a FAQ. 3. Specific faculty duties will be outlined in this section, and a sample adjunct agreement will highlight all facets of the adjunct’s daily work. Calling in when sick and finding substitute teachers will be addressed in this section. C. Section 3 – Statements Explained
    • Integrative Project 20 1. The purpose of the manual will be addressed in this section. It will offer insight into the need for policy and procedure explanations. 2. The Pacific Institute is a curriculum that is part of the campus culture at XYZ University. More than a self-help or life skills curriculum, faculty must understand and teach the material from a total immersion perspective as a new way of life for students who come to XYZ seeking change. i. Home (2008). The Pacific Institute, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.thepacificinstitute.us/v2/D. Section 4 – Technology 1. The technology section will address a faculty member’s username & password, which will grant him or her access to the campus management software, CampusVue. It will be explained that CampusVue allows faculty access to attendance posting, rosters, and final grades. This section will also explain how to address technical problems that arise.E. Section 5 – Accreditation 1. The accreditation section will explain the importance of 100% compliance in the area of a faculty member’s file and will offer a checklist to ensure compliance. It will also explain what ACICS is, which documents are required, and how important these things are to the college. Syllabi templates will be provided here, and suggestions for improvement will be welcomed. i. Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS). (2009). Online Education Database, Retrieved January 16, 2010, from http://oedb.org/accreditation-agencies/acics ii. ACICS – Accreditation Resources. (2008). Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, Retrieved January 27, 2010, from http://www.acics.org/accreditation/content.aspx?id=1884G. Section 6 – Policies 1. It is common for academic freedom to be misunderstood, especially in the career college industry. This section will explain exactly what it is, and how it can and cannot be used at XYZ University. i. 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure. (n.d.). American Association of University Professors, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/ pubsres/policydocs/contents/1940statement.htm ii. Jaschick, S. (2007). Strategies on Academic Freedom. Retrieved February 2, 2010, from Inside Higher Ed at http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/01/15/freedom
    • Integrative Project 21 2. The official inclement weather policy will be outlined for faculty. 3. The official dress code policy will be outlined for faculty, and will offer procedures for students who dress inappropriately in the classroom. 4. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) will be outlined and procedures will be offered for faculty. The official U.S. Department of Education policy will be provided. i. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). U.S. Department of Education, Retrieved January 28, 2010, from http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa 5. Faculty will read about the college’s relationship to Veterans Affairs and read official policies from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. i. About VA. (2009). United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.va.gov/landing2_about.htm 6. XYZ University works closely with the ADA when a student declares a disability. Faculty must be aware of this process, and know the policies associated with it. The manual will outline these processes and policies. i. Declaration of Disability. (2010). The College of William & Mary, Retrieved January 26, 2010, from http://www.wm.edu/offices/ deanofstudents/forms/disability/index.php ii. Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education. (2008). U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights, Retrieved February 6, 2010, from http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transition.html iii. The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy. (2008). The College of New Jersey, Retrieved February 6, 2010, from http://www.tcnj.edu/~affirm/ada.htmlH. Section 7 – Scheduling & Registration 1. Faculty will learn about the Registrar’s Office in this section of the manual. Specifically, faculty will learn where students are to receive their schedules, what to do if a student reports a problem with his or her schedule, and what to do if a student’s name is not on the roster.I. Section 8 – Textbooks 1. For the most part, faculty members have little involvement with Financial Aid. However, they can and often do have a big impact on Financial Aid. It is for that reason that basic official Financial Aid information will be included in the manual. Faculty will also learn about the location of the
    • Integrative Project 22 current textbook list, how to request revisions of instructor copies, how students can request refunds, and see a sample of the textbook evaluation form. i. FAFSA – Free Application for Federal Student Aid. (2010). Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/J. Section 9 – Required Meetings 1. Each quarter, faculty members are required to attend at least one in-service session, and provide proof of their attendance. Proof can be in the form of a sign-in sheet, certificate, agenda, etc. The manual will discuss quarterly opportunities, why these opportunities are required, and where the documentation should be placed. i. About Cathy (2008). C. Holloway Hill Enterprises, Retrieved January 31, 2010, from http://chollowayhill.com/about.htm ii. Brooks, B. (2010). Keeping Them Engaged Faculty Development Seminar, Retrieved January 31, 2010, from http://www.keepingthemengaged.com 2. Similar to quarterly in-service, faculty are required to provide evidence of professional development on a continuing basis. This can be in the form of conferences in the instructor’s field, professional subscriptions, or work on an advanced degree. This section of the manual will discuss the difference between in-service and professional development.K. Section 10 – Appendix 1. This section will be a collection of valuable forms discussed throughout the manual. Instructors will be encouraged to make copies of the forms as needed, or print from the electronic version, as they will need these forms throughout the academic year.L. Section 11 – Acknowledgement 1. After the faculty member has read the entire manual and understands it, he or she will sign the acknowledgement receipt and submit it to the Director of Education for placement in his or her faculty file.
    • Integrative Project 23XYZ UniversityFaculty Manual XYZ University Street Address City, State ZIP (555) 555-5555
    • Integrative Project 24E-mail AccountYour e-mail address will usually be the first letter of your first name, your last name, followed by@xyzuniversity.edu – for example, if your name were Aaron Meredith, your e-mail address wouldmost likely be ameredith@xyzuniversity.edu accessible at https://oma.xyzuniversity.com. TheDirector of Education will supply you with your user name and password. Please check your e-mailat least once per academic day and list this e-mail address on your course syllabi.
    • Integrative Project 25Professional DevelopmentAll instructors are required to turn in the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools(ACICS) Faculty Development Plan Summary each year by the deadline specified by the Director ofEducation. Forms must be typed, printed, signed, and submitted with documented, completedactivities from the prior year. Acceptable activities for faculty development include conferences,seminars, workshops, and publications related to the instructor’s degree field. Documentationincludes agendas, sign-in sheets, programs, mailing labels, or certificates with the instructor’s nameand event information. Other activities may be approved by the Director of Education. In-service isalso included on the form. Faculty members are required to attend one XYZ-sponsored in-serviceper quarter, and are strongly encouraged to attend all other XYZ-sponsored events. If you absolutelyhave to miss the required in-service offerings, you must inform the Director of Education in writing.
    • Integrative Project 26ACICS Data SheetAll instructors are required to turn in the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools(ACICS) Data Sheet each year. Forms must be typed, printed, signed, and submitted by the deadlinespecified by the Director of Education.
    • Integrative Project 27SyllabiCourse syllabi requirements will be provided prior to each quarter. Syllabi are to containspecific elements as required by ACICS and the XYZ corporate HQ. The Director of Educationwill instruct you on the standardized sections of the syllabi and the sections which allow yourmodification. Electronic copies of all syllabi are due to the Director of Education five days beforethe start of each quarter.AttendanceAttendance must be entered for every student in every class in CampusVue without exception.Furthermore, attendance must be entered within 20 minutes of the class start time to ensurecompliance. Students must sign the official class roster at the time of arrival, and if they arrivelate or leave early, they must sign the back-up roster attached to the official roster. At the end ofeach class period, ensure that official rosters and back-up rosters match the attendance recordsentered in CampusVue, and adjust accordingly for accuracy. Once records are 100% accurate,submit your rosters to the Director of Education’s mailbox. It is never acceptable to leave thebuilding without submitting these important documents.If a student’s name is not on the official roster, you must immediately walk him or her to theDirector of Education’s office. It is not acceptable to send the student to the office, or allow thestudent to sign any other documents, or allow the student to sit in class. The student may only beallowed to sit in class when he or she has spoken with the Director of Education and resolvedany scheduling conflicts. If the Director of Education is not available, you must remain with thestudent outside of the classroom until you reach the Director of Education by phone, and aconclusion has been reached.Contact ManagerContact Manager is the part of CampusVue where instructors receive, document, and trackcorrespondence regarding students. When a student misses a class, it is required that theinstructor make contact with that student. All attempts to contact an absent student, and anycontact with an absent student should be entered here.Instructor ExpectationsAll classes must be held for the entire class period. Know your start times and dismissal times,and make sure your students know that you will be holding class for the entire time every classperiod without exception. Additionally, know your start dates and end dates, and understand thatthose must be honored without exception. It is never permissible for breaks to be combined foran early dismissal. It is expected that instructors offer students reasonable break times duringclasses. For instance, if a class lasts three hours and forty minutes, it is reasonable that the classwould take a 10-minute break every hour during that time period each week. If your class laststwo hours, it is reasonable that your class would take just one 15-minute break. Furthermore, allinstructors should arrive to class at least 10 minutes prior to the start of class in order to
    • Integrative Project 28effectively begin class. If you have questions or concerns about these expectations, pleasediscuss them with the Director of Education immediately.Equipment & SuppliesPrior to the start of each quarter, instructors are expected to test all software to be used for a classin the scheduled classroom. Our goal is to become familiar with the software before students useit and to identify problems. Any technology problems before, during, and after the quarter shouldimmediately be reported to the Help Desk at helpdesk@xyzuniversity.edu and courtesy copied tothe Director of Education. XYZ University uses standardized textbooks and software, but youare encouraged to use supplements for personalization. Please also use the Textbook EvaluationForm to make recommendations for changes, and submit this form to the Director of Education.Instructor editions, software, and test banks for a class should be requested well in advance of thequarter start date. Any instructor resource materials not in use should be stored in the facultywork room. Requests for program supplies and equipment should come directly from theApproved Supply & Equipment Lists.Instructor AbsencesAbsences should be rare and for emergencies only. If you must miss, it is your responsibility toensure that classes are covered by another qualified instructor with official transcripts on file atXYZ University. Attendance should be entered in a timely manner by the substitute instructor.Compensation for covering the class should be handled between you and the substitute. Youmust notify the Director of Education of all absences and substitute requests for approval. Failureto do so could result in dismissal.Inclement WeatherShould inclement weather require the closing of the institution, radio and television stations willbe notified as quickly as possible. Radio and television stations carry that information regardingthe closings and campus leadership makes attempts to contact all students and instructorsdirectly. However, if you do not see or hear the name of the college on radio or television,assume we are open. That being said, employees should never endanger their lives or personalsafety when conditions may prohibit safe travel.Proper DressBusiness casual is the appropriate standard of dress for employees of XYZ University. Staff andfaculty are expected to be clean and neat in their personal grooming, observing standards ofmodesty, moderation, good taste, and professionalism. Please note that some program instructorsare required to wear XYZ-approved medical scrubs while teaching classes. For security reasons,all employees, students, and visitors of XYZ University must be identifiable, and must displaytheir ID card. It is required that the card is clipped to a waistband, breast pocket, or worn onyour XYZ lanyard.
    • Integrative Project 29Exam PoliciesAll quizzes and exams must be taken in the classroom with the instructor. Faculty must remain inthe classroom during all quizzes and exams. Should the instructor need to leave the classroom,he or she must call another faculty or staff member in to monitor during the test. Desks must becleared during testing. Take-home/open-book quizzes and exams are highly discouraged. Take-home/open-book midterms and finals are prohibited unless approved by the Director ofEducation. Papers, presentations, trips, and other activities may be part of a midterm and final,but a larger written component must take place on-ground at the institution within the scheduleddate and time of your middle and last class period. Midterm and final exams should be timed in amanner that students are finishing at their normally scheduled release time. For example,consider reviewing with students at the beginning of these class periods before starting the actualtest. Students who complete the exams early may be released directly after taking final exams.Submit electronic copies of all quizzes and exam with answer keys to the Director of Educationat least five days before the start of the quarter.Proficiency ExamsProficiency exams (or “test-outs”) are specifically for “students who believe they have alreadymastered the material for a specific course.” Requests must be initiated by students using theProficiency Exam Request Form and should be submitted to the Director of Education. Theinstitution’s policy for granting test-out credit indicates that the student must be in good standingand must pay a $150.00 non-refundable fee per class to Financial Services prior to exam. It isimportant to note that the fees are not dependent on the outcome of the exams. Students may notcurrently be registered in classes of which they wish to test out, and they may not havewithdrawn from courses during the first week of which they wish to test out. At this time, onlyone exam per course will be permitted without exception, and students must earn the equivalentof at least a “B” on the exam to earn proficiency credit. Courses available for test out are limited,and include General English, General Math, Keyboarding I, Keyboarding II, InformationProcessing, Accounting I, Accounting II, and Microsoft Certification.Grade PoliciesOnce per month, you must show students how they are progressing in your course. You willreceive a grade book template and will be able to print out a grade report for each individualstudent. This grade report can be distributed to students as handouts, or you can choose to deliverthe information to them another way. Students are required to sign the Monthly Grade StandingsForm signifying they understand their current grade, and you should submit those forms once permonth to the Director of Education. Final grades are to be submitted in CampusVue at least 24hours after the last class period of each course you teach. For instance, if you teach a Wednesdayevening course that ended at 9:40 PM, those grades would be due by Thursday at 9:40 PM.Additionally you are required to submit your electronic grade book by e-mail reflecting matchingfinal grades to the Director of Education immediately following your CampusVue submission.
    • Integrative Project 30Grade ChangesGrade changes should be rare because accuracy is extremely important to the institution.However, if an error is discovered and an instructor finds it necessary to request a grade change,the instructor should request this action from the Director of Education on an official “Change inGrade” form. Once the form is completed, it must be returned to the Director of Education withappropriate documentation justifying the grade change. Upon verification by the Director ofEducation, the student’s grade will be adjusted accordingly in CampusVue.Incomplete (I)In rare events or an unforeseen emergency, an Incomplete (I) may be given to a student if astudent is unable to finish the class due to extenuating circumstances. All Incompletes must beapproved by the Director of Education prior to the Incomplete being communicated to thestudent. Valid reasons with solid documentation will need to be provided for extensions to begranted. If an incomplete is given, the student must complete all required work before thebeginning of the next quarter. No work shall be accepted once the next quarter begins. It isbetween the student and the instructor to decide these arrangements, but they must be written inan official contract, and placed in the student’s file. Failure to complete the required work willresult in the grade being calculated by the work that was completed, and calculating a grade of 0for all missing work. This grade will then be posted as the student’s final grade for the course.Academic PlansIf a student is unable to finish the class due to extenuating circumstances that are anticipated inadvance, such as a pregnancy or wedding, the student must be walked to the Director ofEducation to develop an Academic Plan. This plan, allows students to work with theirinstructors to complete assignments or tests ahead of schedule in hopes of successfullycompleting the course. Students must submit a letter to the Director of Education withappropriate documentation and meet all obligations outlined by the instructor on the AcademicPlan. Progress must be met by the student, and the instructor must note this progress inCampusVue.Leave of Absence (LOA)Students may request a leave of absence for medical reasons, military duty, and jury duty. AnLOA shall be reasonable in duration, and cannot exceed one full 90 calendar days or one quarterin length. For the leave to be approved there must be a reasonable expectation that the studentwill return. The student must return at the beginning of a course or term start. The student mustpresent a completed Student Leave of Absence form and appropriate documentation to theschool prior to the start of the LOA. The Director of Education will recommend approval ordenial. If approved, the student will meet with the Financial Services to determine what effectthe LOA will have on the student’s financial aid eligibility.
    • Integrative Project 31RegistrationA student may register/unregister a class during the Drop/Add period. The Drop/Add period for aStart I is usually the first seven calendar days of the term. The Drop/Add period for a Start II isusually the first three calendar days of the term. In the event of a holiday during a Drop/Addperiod as defined above, the Drop/Add period may be extended one day. A student can request achange in his/her schedule at any time during the Drop/Add period. This is initiated bycompletion of the Drop/Add Form. The Director of Education will ensure a copy of theDrop/Add Form is maintained in the student’s academic file, and will distribute a copy of theDrop/Add Form to Financial Services. The Director of Education will register/unregister thestudent for any changes of classes in CampusVue, and any such change will be reflected onsubsequent class rosters.Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), we are not allowed to shareinformation pertaining to students over the age of 18 unless a signed written release is on file.This policy pertains to parents, spouses, employers, etc. It pertains to whereabouts, grades, andemergencies. Unless the signed waiver is on file, the information cannot be shared. In addition,information concerning students may only be shared with instructors and staff within theinstitution on a need-to-know basis.Independent Study (IS)Students may take a course by independent study only if the course is a requirement for thatstudent’s graduation and the Director of Education indicates the course will not be offered beforethe student’s anticipated graduation date or the student can demonstrate unusual circumstancesthat are conducive to an independent study. Students must have indicated ability to do well in anindependent study learning environment, and they must possess a GPA of 3.0 or better, or obtaina waiver from the Director of Education. Students must meet with the instructor in a formalclassroom setting for at least one hour per week at prearranged times and may be required toattend extra lab sessions. Please note that signed rosters and accurate attendance entry inCampusVue are required for Independent Study courses. Students must complete all normallyrequired coursework, including reports, assignments, research, and tests. The instructor reservesthe right to terminate the independent study course and assign the student a grade of “W” if theindependent study student has not progressed in a reasonable manner by midpoint, and there isno appeal process. Independent study courses must be completed within the quarter, and a gradeof “I” may not be given.
    • Integrative Project 32Appendix A – Faculty File Checklist
    • Integrative Project 33Appendix B – ACICS Faculty Development Plan
    • Integrative Project 34Appendix C – ACICS Data Sheet
    • Integrative Project 35Appendix D – Independent Study (IS) Request Form
    • Integrative Project 36Appendix E – Independent Study (IS) Contract
    • Integrative Project 37Appendix F – Grade Book Template
    • Integrative Project 38Appendix G – Reporting Structure
    • Integrative Project 39 Appendix H – Acknowledgement ReceiptI hereby acknowledge that I have received, read and understand the XYZ University Faculty Handbook.I agree to comply fully with all of the policies and procedures set forth in the handbook, as well as otherpolicies and procedures that may be implemented from time to time by the College. I understand mycompliance with the policies and procedures is a condition for me to continue to be eligible to teachclasses at the College and that any violations of the policies and procedures may result in correctiveaction up to and including termination.Faculty Signature DatePrint Name Title
    • Integrative Project 40 References1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure. (n.d.). American Association of University Professors, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/pubsres/policydocs/contents/1940statement.htmAbout Cathy (2008). C. Holloway Hill Enterprises, Retrieved January 31, 2010, from http://chollowayhill.com/about.htmAbout VA. (2009). United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.va.gov/landing2_about.htmAccrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS). (2009). Online Education Database, Retrieved January 16, 2010, from http://oedb.org/accreditation-agencies/acicsACICS – Accreditation Resources. (2008). Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, Retrieved January 27, 2010, from http://www.acics.org/accreditation/ content.aspx?id=1884Adjunct Faculty Handbook. (2009). Paradise Valley Community College, Retrieved January 27, 2010, from http://www.pvc.maricopa.edu/~afi/docs/handbook.pdfAdjunct Faculty Information & Handbook (2009). Pellissippi State Technical Community College, Retrieved February 3, 2010, from http://www.pstcc.edu/departments/instruction/ adjunct.htmlBrooks, B. (2010). Keeping Them Engaged Faculty Development Seminar, Retrieved January 31, 2010, from http://www.keepingthemengaged.comDeclaration of Disability. (2010). The College of William & Mary, Retrieved January 26, 2010, from http://www.wm.edu/offices/deanofstudents/forms/disability/index.phpFaculty Handbook. (2009). University of Colorado, Retrieved January 25, 2010, from
    • Integrative Project 41 https://www.cu.edu/content/faculty-handbookFaculty Information (n.d.). Drury University, Retrieved February 6, 2010, from http://www.drury.edu/section/section.cfm?sid=122FAFSA – Free Application for Federal Student Aid. (2010). Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). U.S. Department of Education, Retrieved January 28, 2010, from http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpaHome (2008). The Pacific Institute, Retrieved February 7, 2010, from http://www.thepacificinstitute.us/v2/Jaschick, S. (2007). Strategies on Academic Freedom. Retrieved February 2, 2010, from Inside Higher Ed at http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/01/15/freedomMaistro, M. (2009). The Adjunct’s Moment of Truth. Retrieved February 5, 2010, from Inside Higher Ed at http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2009/09/10/maistoStudents with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education. (2008). U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights, Retrieved February 6, 2010, from http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transition.htmlThe Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy. (2008). The College of New Jersey, Retrieved February 6, 2010, from http://www.tcnj.edu/~affirm/ada.html