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Aesca entrepreneurship

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  • 1. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts
  • 2. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Introduction to Entrepreneurship Three Types of Business Choosing “Our” Model Business Financing Options Components of a Business Plan Demographics SWOT Analysis Business Needs The Entrepreneur's Business Function/ Philosophy
  • 3. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Culinary Entrepreneurship The capacity and willingness to undertake conception, organization, and management of a productive venture with all attendant risks while seeking profit (triple bottom line) as a reward. In the world of culinary entrepreneurship there are many different avenues to choose from. The three major categories are:
  • 4. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Restaurant Full service, quick service, franchise, independent Product Service Packaged items to sell wholesale (and retail) Catering, personal chef, food trucks
  • 5. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts “I have initiative and insight and guts, but not much money. I will succeed because my efforts and my focus defeat bigger and better funded competitors. I am fearless and keep my focus on growing the business - not on politics, career advancement or other wasteful distractions.” - Seth Godin, The Bootstrapper’s Bible
  • 6. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts One Line Description of Our Business Location Concept Name Product Logo
  • 7. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Once the entrepreneur has the concept in mind, basic questions will need to be answered: How will it be financed? SBA Loan Business Bank Loan Private Investors Silent Partnerships Active Partnerships Self Finance
  • 8. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Do I have a sound business plan? The “roadmap” to a business, one can’t start without it! One Line Description of the Company Financial Projections - Income, Expense, Capital Risk Mitigating Milestones Market Analysis Why You Are Uniquely Qualified to Succeed Organization and Management Marketing and Sales Plan Appendix - Resumes, Licenses, Permits, etc. Components of a Business Plan:
  • 9. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What are the demographics? Population of immediate surroundings Population of bedroom communities Vicinity of bedroom communities Average household income Percentage of working adults vs. retired adults Percentage of adults to children Percentage of earned college degrees and beyond Number of other like businesses in a five mile radius
  • 10. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What are the physical needs, capital needs? Buy Out, Startup or Lease Buy Real Property? FF and E (The equipment that is used to produce the product of the business: Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment) Square Footage Needs
  • 11. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What is the SWOT of my Business? Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
  • 12. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Will I have access to product? Food and beverage vendors, with product that fits into my concept, who would deliver Pool of talent within the local demographics Fitting a healthy wage scale into budget Internet, newspaper, job fairs, open house, word of mouth, lateral hiring Can I obtain a good staff?
  • 13. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What licenses and permits will I need? Company Registration State Identification Filing, Fictitious Name Statement FEIN Number State and City Sellers Permit Local Health Permit (County) Payroll Tax Number (EDD) Liquor License Signage Permit (if applicable) Other Needs: workman’s compensation, liability insurance, vendor credit, IT license, etc.
  • 14. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What will my business entity be? Sole Proprietorships A sole proprietorship is a business owned by one person for profit. The owner may operate the business alone or may employ others. The owner of the business has unlimited liability for the debts incurred by the business. Partnerships A partnership is a business owned by two or more people. In most forms of partnerships, each partner has unlimited liability for the debts incurred by the business. The three typical classifications of for-profit partnerships are general partnerships, limited, and limited liability partnerships.
  • 15. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Cooperative Company Often referred to as a "co-op,” a cooperative is a limited liability business that can organize for-profit or not-for- profit. A cooperative differs from a for-profit corporation in that it has members, as opposed to shareholders, who share decision-making authority. Cooperatives are typically classified as either consumer cooperatives or worker cooperatives. Cooperatives are fundamental to the ideology of economic democracy.
  • 16. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Corporations A corporation is a limited liability business that has a separate legal personality from its members. Corporations can be either government-owned or privately owned, and corporations can organize either for-profit or not-for-profit. A privately owned, for-profit corporation is owned by shareholders who elect a board of directors to direct the corporation and hire its managerial staff. A privately owned, for-profit corporation can be either privately held or publicly held.
  • 17. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Limited Liability Companies (LLC) A Limited Liability Company (LLC) is a business structure allowed by state statute. LLCs are popular because, similar to a corporation, owners have limited personal liability for the debts and actions of the LLC. Other features of LLCs are more like a partnership, providing management flexibility and the benefit of pass-through taxation. Owners of an LLC are called members. Since most states do not restrict ownership, members may include individuals, corporations, other LLCs and foreign entities. There is no maximum number of members. Most states also permit “single member” LLCs, those having only one owner.
  • 18. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What function will I serve for the business? Accounting/ Payroll Floor Management HR BOH Purchasing Receiving Development Design Marketing and Promotions Special Event Coordinator
  • 19. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts A mission statement should guide the actions of the organization, spell out its overall goal, provide a path, and guide decision-making. It provides the framework or context within which the company's strategies are formulated. Check out the book “Good to Great” by Jim Collins
  • 20. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Examples of Corporate Mission Statements Mc Donald’s To provide the fast food customer food prepared in the same high-quality manner world-wide that is tasty, reasonably-priced & delivered consistently in a low-key décor and friendly atmosphere. Chili’s To spice up everyday life! Denny’s Great food, great service, by great people, every time Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse To build a growing, profitable restaurant business in which the highest standards of quality, value and hospitality are expressed.
  • 21. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Mission Statements of the Chef Owned, Farm to Table Restaurants The Kitchen, Boulder We believe in the power of good food and good drink to connect people as family, friends & a community, and The Kitchen remains committed to our mission of creating community through food. John’s Restaurant, Boulder Service is an effective soundtrack: unnoticeable by virtue of its flawlessness; unobtrusive in its presence. Taste and tastefulness unite without pretension. Paley’s Place, Portland Oregon A commitment to creativity and flexibility in cuisine, sophistication in service, and intimacy in the dining experience
  • 22. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts How do you write a mission statement? Three Components 1. The Purpose -What are the needs that we exist to address? 2. The Business - What are we doing to address these needs? 3. The Values - The principles or beliefs that guide our work.
  • 23. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Philosophy is how the company achieves their mission statement. Example: The Triangle of Success Keep it Simple ….And… Live it, Breathe it, Teach it, Believe in it!
  • 24. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts GUESTS INTERNAL GUESTS $$$ SUCCESS
  • 25. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Know your product Go over and beyond expectations Know your standards and exceed them Always be proactive and organized Give the guest the best experience of the lifetime Guests
  • 26. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Be kind Be complete and thorough Be a team player Be reliable Be punctual and ready to work Be efficient Be supportive Be respectful Internal Guests
  • 27. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Provide the “ultimate experience” for repeat business and word of mouth advertising for new guests Suggestive sell to maximize revenue and in turn provide the “ultimate experience” $$$ Top Line Bottom Line Control costs by portion control, waste control, labor control, and taking care of products of service such as china, glassware, flatware, etc.
  • 28. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts GUESTS INTERNAL GUESTS $$$ SUCCESS
  • 29. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts www.sethgodin.com/sg/downloads/knockknoc.pdf sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/files/whos_there.pdf www.sethgodin.com/sg/docs/bootstrap.pdf Review today’s power point slides.
  • 30. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Opening / Continuing Marketing Operational Strategies Understanding a Triple Bottom Line (the 3 Ps) Forecasting / Budgeting Guest Speaker Review our Company so Far
  • 31. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts A marketing plan is a plan which outlines a company's overall marketing efforts. The marketing plan can function from two points: strategy and tactics. “Strategic planning" is an annual process, typically covering just the year ahead. To be most effective, the plan has to be formalized, usually in written form, as a formal "marketing plan." The essence of the process is that it moves from the general to the specific, from the vision to the mission to the goals to the objectives of the business, then down to the individual action plans for each part of the marketing program. It is also an interactive process, so that the draft output of each stage is checked to see what impact it has on the earlier stages, and is amended.
  • 32. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts How long does my marketing plan need to be? How far out should I make a marketing plan? How long should I take to write this plan? Who should see this plan? What is the relationship between my marketing plan and my business plan?
  • 33. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Examples of Pre-opening Marketing and Promotion Hire a Publicist? Website Press Releases Community Liaisons Exterior Signage Neighborhood “Coming Soon” Mailing (by zip) Cross Marketing with Local Businesses Special Offers “Trade” Radio, Local Newspapers and Magazines Social Media
  • 34. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Continuing Marketing Press Releases, Free Listings Fund Raisings Local Event Support Internal Marketing of Events and Specials Special Offers Banners Telephone Marketing Radio Cable / Television Social Media Website Advertising
  • 35. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Hours / Days of Operation Steps of Service Staffing Needs, Pay Scale, Scheduling Function of “Chiefs” and “Indians” Purchasing and Deliveries Employee “Rules”- Handbook Floor Plan FOH / BOH / Service Stations Happy Hour? Presentation of Product Presentation of Product Options (Menu) Tender and Accounting Operations Service / Product Recovery Policies Reservation Policies To Go? Delivery? Pick Up?
  • 36. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Profit The 3 Ps People Planet
  • 37. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What does the Triple Bottom Line look like? P #1-Profit-Not just profit for your company Economic gains for humanity: jobs created; small businesses started or expanded; environmentally responsible industries engaged; poverty reduced or alleviated. P#2- People-Not just your customers and staff Social improvements for humanity: people of color or low-wealth engaged; educational systems improved; racism dismantled; power shared. P#3- Planet, not just your immediate area Environmental stewardship: land/water resources protected; working lands locally-owned; water quality improved; native plants and herbs propagated.
  • 38. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Locavore! Okay, What’s So Big About Local Food Fresh food tastes better! Fresh food is healthier! Local food travels less distance, it consumes less resources in its journey to your plate. Local food equals local jobs. More of your money stays with the local farmer and the shops that support his/her work. Local food is more seasonal food and eating local supports more diverse crops. Local eating supports biodiversity which is more sustainable in the long term. Local food chains support social connections with your community.
  • 39. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Sales Forecast Seats / projected turns / meal periods / check (cover) average per meal period Example #1: 2000 sq. ft. / 100 seats / dinner only / $42.00 check avg. / open 7 days January 1-1/2 turns (150) x 42 x 31 days Projected sales $195,300.00 Example #2: 1500 sq. ft. / 50 seats / breakfast & lunch / $8.50 ck breakfast / $11.00 ck lunch / open 7 days January 2 Turns (100) breakfast x 8.50x 31 days = $26,350 2 Turns (100) lunch x 11 x 31 days = $34,100 Projected sales $60,450 Of course you can breakout food vs. beverage, but this is a good starting point.
  • 40. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Projected Expenses Fixed vs. Controllable Fixed expenses are those that don’t change. Controllable are ones that fluctuate with business. Example of Fixed: Rent (unless the triple net includes a % of sales) Management salary (unless elevated by bonus) Insurance Licenses / Fees / Permits Waste Management Phone and Cable Equipment Leases Contract Cleaning Pest Control You would budget controllable expenses on average to the industry, then you manage them to stay within those $$ amounts, only when revenues are below a breaking point does that become impossible.
  • 41. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Expense Forecasting Guidelines The difference between a forecast (budget) and a P&L. - the first is what you would like the numbers to be, the second is what they actually are. Cost of goods - food (28%-33% depending on concept) Cost of goods wine (25-33% depending on concept) Cost of goods liquor (17-20% depending on product mix) Cost of beer (11-20% depending on concept) Total sales cog: (31% healthy) Payroll, benefits and fees (max 36%) Cost of goods and payroll should not go over 67% of your top line revenue The bad news, national average return on restaurants is 7%. I say we shoot for at least 12%. That gives us 21% for the rest of our expenses. Let’s see how we fair…
  • 42. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Other Expenses Office supplies Paper products (0.5%) Permits and licenses (fixed) Postage Printing Rent (fixed, most cases) Property tax (one-time expense) Repairs Utilities Waste management (fixed) Advertising (2% gross sales) Credit card processing fees (2.75% gross sales) Cable phone entertainment (fixed) Contract cleaning (fixed) Pest control (fixed) Daily décor Workman’s comp (1% of payroll) Insurance (fixed) Janitorial Equipment lease (fixed) Linen (1%)
  • 43. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts www.bizjournals.com/denver/print-edition/2011/11/04/young- denverites-open-restaurants.html www.nytimes.com/2011/05/08/nyregion/rules-and-reality-test- locavore-chefs-in-connecticut.html www.newyork.grubstreet.com/2011/08/wal-mart.html Review today’s power point slides.
  • 44. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Product Development Packaging / Co-Packaging Scaling Marketing Distribution Forecasting Guest Speaker Product Workshop with Guest Speaker
  • 45. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts So you want to sell your own product? Eleven steps to take 1. Place the Test •Believe in your product •Is there a demand for your product? 2. From the Kitchen to the Marketplace •Create the bottle, label design and logo •Get your nutritional analysis and UPC •www.rlfoodtestinglaboratory.com 3. Create Your Business Plan As we did in our model restaurant, you would take the same steps for your product business
  • 46. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Do I have a sound business plan? The “roadmap” to a business, one can’t start without it! One Line Description of the Company Financial Projections - Income, Expense, Capital Risk Mitigating Milestones Market Analysis Why You Are Uniquely Qualified to Succeed Organization and Management Marketing and Sales Plan Appendix - Resumes, Licenses, Permits, etc. Components of a Business Plan:
  • 47. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts 4. Acquire Financing Again, the options are that of the restaurant model business. One more option: www.kickstarter.com 5. Check Your Licensing and Zoning Laws Each state has its own laws, you can access this information online.
  • 48. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts 6. Review the FDA’s Good Manufacturing Practices These rules and regulations determine the process that you must adhere to when preparing, packaging and distributing your goods: www.fda.gov/food 7. Find Your Kitchen Facility Your kitchen facility must be properly licensed to manufacture commercial goods.
  • 49. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts 8. Produce and Package Your Product Establish a good business relationship with a manufacturer who specializes in jars, bottles and boxes that you need for your company. Label it accordingly with ingredients and nutritional information. These labeled packages will then need to be placed in boxes or coolers for shipment to their final destination: www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension What is Co-Packaging? You can produce your completely manufactured product and send it to another facility to be packaged, packed and delivered back to you. This could be saving your time and money.
  • 50. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts 9. Promote and Market Your Product Product promotion often means the difference between success or failure. Getting your product before the consumer and having it recognized is the first step to making a sale. The most used means of promotion are: Trade Show Exhibitions In-Store Demonstrations Giveaways Mailings Testimonials Show Awards Internet
  • 51. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Trade Shows As promotional tools, trade shows should be a part of a fully integrated and well-managed campaign. They rate high on the list of important commercial vehicles. The benefits of food show participation include the following: Meet Customers Learn About the Competition Evaluate Product Packaging Test Product Pricing Rate Various Promotion Techniques Identify Important Trends Solicit Customer Reaction Make Sales
  • 52. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts 10. Scale Your Business Do you want your business to scale? Are you in to create a job for yourself?... or build an “empire?” Do you want to do it all yourself with help from family and friends?… or do you want to head up a team of employees, be your company’s CEO?
  • 53. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts 11. Distribute Your Product We’ve created our Yummy Crisp Cookies We want them to be BIG! How do we distribute them?
  • 54. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts There are options… Open Yummy Crisps outlets around the country. Sell Yummy Crisps through a mail order catalog. Sell through your website. Visit stores around the country and persuade them to carry your Yummy Crisps. Contact several key distributors and have them add yummy crisps to their line. Distributors!! Now that’s the idea! How do you get a distributor?
  • 55. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Ideas to Entice Distributors to Carry Your Product Offer relatively more money for the distributor than the competition. You can offer more perks for the distributor than the competition. You can “buy” your way into the distribution chain. You can fly the distributor out to your Hawaii sales conference to see what your company is about. You can tie your product in with other products that you or other manufacturers create. You can show the marketing campaign that supports your product. You can demonstrate genuinely strong consumer appeal. You can show that you've already secured other large retail contracts (if, of course, you have).
  • 56. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Forecast Basics of Yummy Crisps 15,000 packets of cookies per month wholesale Wholesale selling price $2.50 8,000 packets per month retail Retail price $4.50 Cost to produce: 19% of retail per packet Total labor: 33% Packaging: 10% 800 sq ft kitchen needed at $2 per sq ft
  • 57. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Building a business plan for a service business How do you market service businesses? Sustainable (green) catering Becoming a Private Chef The world of food trucks Guest speaker from the service industry Workshop on applying our business knowledge to the service business
  • 58. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts There is no solid answer to these questions in the culinary service business: Where? When? Revenue? Costs? Staffing? Equipment needs? Business levels? This makes a business plan a little more challenging.
  • 59. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts How do I market my catering business? Design a Catering Logo Build a Catering Website Create a Press Release Tell Everyone You Know Print Your Catering Logo Pimp Your Catering Ride Go Mobile Advertise Work on Public Relations (PR) Look for Lucrative Partnerships
  • 60. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Sustainable (Green) Catering The ultimate in a triple bottom line business The 3 R’s Reduce Eliminate waste Reuse Use catering items you can reuse Recycle Separate all designated recyclables
  • 61. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Reduce Ask clients to get RSVPs so you can buy the appropriate amount of food. Avoid offering wasteful “box lunches” that many caterers offer. Instead, offer large platters of sandwiches and salads and make sure the containers get reused or recycled. Provide condiments in bulk instead of individually packaged. Use cloth napkins and table cloths or buy paper products made with recycled content. Avoid “Styrofoam”, though it is less costly, it cannot be recycled. Some states, like Oregon, have made Styrofoam illegal. If you can’t use paper plates or reusable ones, use plastic plates with the recycling arrows and recycle them. Go organic! If organic is not available, the next best choice is local produce. Not only will you be supporting local farmers, but less energy and fossil fuels will be expended in transportation. Also, vegetarian options are more earth friendly than meat options and require less of the earth’s resources to produce.
  • 62. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Reuse Use your own plate ware and flatware or rent dishes and silverware instead of using disposables. If renting, dishes do not have to be returned clean, just scraped free of food. Compost as much as possible, from event and from prep kitchen. Rent or borrow infrequently used items like punchbowls or extra large platters. If you must use disposables, reuse or recycle them afterwards. If you are using sterno (green style)and go through only half, cover it and save it for the next catering. Recycle container. Dispose of Pre consumer food waste and post consumer food leftovers responsibly.
  • 63. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Recycle Segregate recycle bin from garbage bin at your commissary, be strict on their usage Obtain all your disposable service items in compostable form (utensils, cups, etc.) to simplify the recycling process Properly label your receptacles to educate users and avoid confusion Clearly announce your waste management plans so that diners will use it properly and gain awareness Consider using “garbage monitors” initially to assist in the success of this regimen to ensure compliance and educate users Make sure that those handling the waste after the event are aware of your regimen and accommodate it
  • 64. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Green Your Marketing Print all promotional materials and menus on recycled paper Always print two-sided Opt for Internet promotions over print advertising Entice your clients to use recycled paper for their invitations or to use Evite.com instead Send out proposals via Internet rather than snail mail
  • 65. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Green Your Menu How do you answer these questions? Can you offer a seasonal menu featuring locally grown ingredients? Do you have local suppliers you could source these ingredients from? Which ingredients can you procure locally, and how would you define “local?” Can you cater a meal using all or mostly certified organic ingredients? Which ingredients are or are you not able to procure organically? Do you have the means to confirm their certification? Will you prepare all of the items you serve? What will be frozen or purchased fresh? Are you able to provide dietary information on the menu you serve? Are you able to offer a healthier menu (e.g. lower in calories), either exclusively or as one option for an event? What types of vegetarian menus can you offer? Gluten free? Are you able to charge the prices for a green menu and still be profitable? Are the coffee, bananas, and/or chocolate you offer Fair Trade certified?
  • 66. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What is Fair Trade? Fair Trade is a trading partnership, based on dialogue, transparency and respect, that seeks greater equity in international trade. It contributes to sustainable Development by offering better trading conditions to, and securing the rights of, marginalized producers and workers – especially in the South. Fair Trade Organizations, backed by consumers, are engaged actively in supporting producers, awareness raising and in campaigning for changes in the rules and practice of conventional international trade. So how does a product become Fair Trade Certified? The standards are set by FLO- International (Fair-trade Labeling Organizations), and a certification body, FLO-CERT, and the system involves independent auditing of producers to ensure the agreed standards are met. Once products meet the standards, they can apply to use the Fair Trade logo.
  • 67. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Becoming a Private Chef Choose a specialization Start researching recipes and menus Practice, practice, practice Join an online personal chefs network Build a client base Advertise yourself Keep track of referrals Approach new clients Get testimonials Licenses?
  • 68. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts The New Trend - FOOD TRUCKS Advantages over eat-in restaurants: It can go to where the customers are It has lower overhead than eat-in restaurants It requires far less staff It can be more focused, therefore have less menu items to deal with It can provide a better COG, less waste The owner can set his / her own schedule
  • 69. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Getting Your Food Truck Business Rolling Is a food truck legal in your neighborhood? Where can you do business? What licenses to you need? Choose a business name Write a food truck menu Write a business plan Find financing Equip your truck Get the word out Create an emergency fund Have clear goals
  • 70. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Menu Development, Cross Utilization Specials Beverage Pricing Concept Entrepreneurship Quiz Importance of Customer Service Student Locavore presentation Entrepreneurship Wrap Up
  • 71. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Menu Development Cross Utilization Pricing Product Seasonality Commitment to the Triple Bottom Line Balance and Variety Layout and Presentation
  • 72. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Cross Utilization Mixed Greens Salad Champagne Vinaigrette, Radish, Cucumber, Tomatoes Salmon Pastrami Salad Grilled Peaches, Arugula, Hazelnut Rye Crumble, Cucumber Earl Grey Vinaigrette Shrimp and Summer Vegetable Risotto Summer Squash, Leeks, Corn, Peas, Arugula 12 oz. New York Strip Short Rib, Truffled Mushroom Risotto, Roasted Vegetables, Gorgonzola Beurre Rouge Roasted Halibut Tomato, Artichokes, Fava Beans, Arugula Gnocchi and Lemongrass-Dill Cream 12 oz. Stuffed Burger Bacon, Cheddar, Tomato Aioli, Arugula, Beer Onions, Poutine Fries Calf's Liver Whipped Potato, Onions, Smoked Bacon, Asparagus
  • 73. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Balance and Variety in Main Course The “Meat-Eater” Options 12 oz. New York Steak 12 oz. Burger The “No-Frills” Diner Options 12 oz. Burger Roast Chicken Breast Lighter Preparations Summer Squash Puttanesca Cashew Crusted Cod Roasted Halibut Seafood Lover Options Cashew Crusted Cod Roasted Halibut Pan Seared Scallops Vegetarian Options Summer Squash Puttanesca Capellini Rustica
  • 74. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Pricing Range of prices Salads, soups, appetizers $6-$12 Main dishes: $15-$32 Comparative to Competition Profitable to 30-32% (to the higher side considering product) High perceived value vs. actual value Example Cog: Puttanesca vs. Halibut Product Local, Fresh, Organic, Frozen, Canned? What are your sources? Seasonality When do your change your menu? Are you flexible to reprint?
  • 75. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Commitment to the Triple Bottom Line (How does this restaurant size up?) Financial Profit Considering that this particular restaurant has been in business for over 25 years – the $$ must be in line. People They cater to the public. Rice pasta alternative for the gluten free clientele. They also offer an entire gluten free menu on request. They have a commitment to healthy, organic food choices despite the higher cost. The owner of this restaurant had been very charitable throughout his career. He worked with non profit organizations such as hope, project mercy and many more. He unfortunately passed away recently but his restaurant and legacy lives on and has been nominated for the “real” awards.
  • 76. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Planet (How do they support Mother Earth?) Purchase Locally Support the local farmers Saves on transportation / less pollution Buy Organic No pesticides or run off Recycle All Products Possible Compost When Possible Use Recycled Paper for Menus International Involvement Not just involved locally but internationally helping countries such as Ethiopia be ecologically strong to stop hunger and improve their environment
  • 77. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Layout and Presentation Daily Menu Menu Board Verbal or Written Specials Verbal, Written or Visual Dessert Menu Table Menus Beverage Menus Redundancy in Menus Photos in Menus Advertising in Menus
  • 78. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts What drives the specials you choose to feature? You need to move product that is nearing the end of its shelf life You need to drive down food cost You need to drive up check average There is a short window of seasonality for a product
  • 79. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Let’s say you are the Food & Beverage Director of a hotel. This week you have a group of 100 cowboys for the stock show staying at your hotel who will visit your bar every evening. Next week you have a group of high-rolling lawyers who will also visit the bar every evening. These cowboys drink Coors Lights at $2.00 per pint Your cost on that pint is 25 cents, $0.25 divided by $2.00 is a 12.5% COG Each cowboy has a beer a night, 100 x 5 nights = 500 beers x $2.00 Revenue = $1,000.00 and your COG is 12.5% The lawyers drink Glen Fiddich Scotch at $8.00 per drink Your cost is $3.50 divided by $8.00 is a 44% COG Each lawyer has one a night, 100 x 5 nights = 500 drinks x $8.00 Revenue = $4,000.00 Your budgeted beverage percentage is 25%. What do you do?
  • 80. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts How did this man make a difference in our culinary world?
  • 81. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Profit Revolutionized and modernized the menu, the art of cooking and the organization of the professional kitchen. Simplified the menu as it had been, writing the dishes down in the order in which they would be served Developed the first à la Carte menu Wrote a number of books, many of which continue to be considered important today People Simplified the art of cooking by getting rid of ostentatious food displays and elaborate garnishes and by reducing the number of courses served Emphasized the use of seasonal foods and lighter sauces Simplified professional kitchen Planet As well as making changes in the culinary world, Escoffier undertook several philanthropic endeavors including the organization of programs to feed the hungry and programs to financially assist retired chefs
  • 82. © Copyright Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts Our Founder is the True Definition of “Entrepreneur” Escoffier received several honors in his lifetime. The French government recognized him in 1920 by making him a Chevalier of the Legion d' Honneur, and later an Officer in 1928. The honors due Escoffier can be summed up by a quote from Germany's Kaiser Wilhelm II when he told Escoffier, “I am the Emperor of Germany, but you are the emperor of chefs.” His legacy lives on…through you!!!