29 shellfish
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29 shellfish

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29 shellfish 29 shellfish Presentation Transcript

  • Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Shellfish Mollusks Crustaceans
  • Mollusks • Bivalve = mussels, clams, oysters, scallops • Univalve = conch, abalone, snails • Cephalopod = squid, octopus, cuttlefish Anatomy; three body parts • Muscular foot for movement, • Internal organs • Exterior mantle or shell if they have one Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Mollusks
  • Bivalve: Mollusks with two hinged shells • Mussels; attach to structures i.e. rocks, vessels, ropes with the use of a “beard” (hair like strands protruding from the shell. When the beard is pulled out the mussel will die. • Clams; burrow in sand/mud, must be cleaned well to remove debris. • Available live, shucked or chopped • Farmed in natural beads • Scallops; lie on ocean floor and swim by clapping shells • Available live, IQF or packed (wet and dry) • Some farming mostly harvested in the wild • Oysters; burrow in sand/mud, must be cleaned well to remove debris • • • • • Farmed in natural beds European – flat, mild with metallic taste Asian – cupped, melon and cucumber aromas,(West Coast US) Virginian – cupped, green leaf aroma (East Coast US) Available live, shucked or smoked Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Efficient farm raised product using a buoy and ropes • Available live, par-cooked in the shell, shucked or smoked
  • Univalve: Mollusks with one shell • • • • • Can grow very large Delicate flavor Can be tough and chewy if not prepared properly Overfishing depleted much of the wild population Farming practices now make it a sustainable product • Abalone • Can be tough and chewy if not prepared properly • Overfishing depleted much of the wild population • Farming practices now make it a sustainable product Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Conch (Sea Snail) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOn6VjEQOug
  • Literally means Head on Foot Mobile carnivores with large eyes and long arms (tentacles), shell is an internal structure called the “pen”, mantle contracts to expel water through funnel (foot) for movement. • Squid • Octopus • Cuttlefish • Harvested in the wild Edible parts include; • Tentacles • Mantle or tube • ink Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Cephalopods; Mollusks with no external shell
  • Crustacean • • • • • Crabs Lobsters Shrimp Crayfish Barnacles • Crustaceans go through a molting process where they shed the hard shell in order to grow. • New shell underneath hardens in a short period of time • Some crustaceans are edible during the molting process and are highly prized as soft shell and can be prepared whole Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Segmented Exoskeleton
  • Storage • IQF • Block • Glazed • Shelled or shucked • Pasteurized canned crab • Dry pack scallops – no additives • Wet pack scallops – water and preservatives may be added • Processed • • • • Smoked Canned Chopped Peeled and deveined, P & D Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Live shellfish should be stored at 41 ̊F • Store in boxes or net bags where they can breath • Frozen shellfish
  • Federal Inspection • • • • Monitoring water safety Tracking sales and distribution Tracking processing facilities Investigating outbreaks • Shellfish stock tags • Used for live mollusks • Must be kept with the original storage container until the product is completely used • Must be kept on file for 90 days after the last of the product is used Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Like fish, shellfish inspection is voluntary • Provisions for monitoring the sale and distribution of live mollusks are strict and conducted through the FDA (food and drug administration) and the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference.
  • Cooking Shellfish • • • • • Bivalves may be shucked or steamed open Clams, scallops, oysters are eaten raw or cooked Mussels are always cooked Univalves require special tenderizing and preparations Cephalopods require special cleaning and cooking • Crustaceans • • • • Usually need to be partially cooked to remove shells Shells used for stocks Overcooking makes them rubbery Once cooked can be served cold or reheated Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Mollusks