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27 fin fish
27 fin fish
27 fin fish
27 fin fish
27 fin fish
27 fin fish
27 fin fish
27 fin fish
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27 fin fish

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Published in: Business, Self Improvement
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  1. Fin Fish Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  2. Categorizing Fin Fish • Round or Flat • Two filets surround the body cavity and are smaller • Two filets encompass the entire length and are larger The butchering technique is based on the shape of the fish. Other shapes • Large fish are usually cut into steaks or sectioned into loins • There are usually 4 loins • Tuna, sword fish, shark • Exceptions • Eels • monkfish Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Round fish have two identical sides that produce two identical filets when butchered • Flat fish have a top and bottom that are identical and produce four filets.
  3. Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Round Fish Flat Fish
  4. Lean or Oily fish • More delicate • Moist cooking • Low gentle heat • Fatty fish • • • • Dry heat Grilling Firm flesh will hold up to higher temperatures Better for cooking rare or slightly under done Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder The amount of fat in a fish will help determine the best cooking methods • Lean fish
  5. • Whole or round – as caught, intact • Drawn – viscera (internal organs) removed, the most common way to purchase fish • Dressed – viscera, gills, fins and scales removed (scale on or off) – pan dressed – tail, fins trimmed, head removed • Butterflied – pan dressed fish, boned and opened like a book both sides remain attached by the back skin or belly skin • Fillet – the side of a fish removed intact, boneless or semiboneless, with or without skin • Steak – a cross-section slice, with a small section of the backbone (darne), sually prepared from large round fish. • Wheel or center cut – used for swordfish and shark, contains 4 quadrants surrounding the backbone. Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Market Forms of Fish
  6. Handling Fish • • • • • Between 30 ̊F – 34 ̊F Stored on ice Use a drainage pan w/a catch pan underneath Store the way they swim Change ice regularly • Storing fillet • • • • • Between 30 ̊F – 34 ̊F Wrap in butcher paper Layer on ice Use a drainage pan w/ a catch pan underneath Change ice regularly Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Storing whole fish
  7. Fresh vs Frozen • Fresh – the item is not and has never been frozen • Flash-frozen – quickly frozen on usually on board the ship or at the processing plant within hours of being caught • Fresh-frozen – not as quick as flash frozen • Frozen – stored at 0 ̊F or below • Glazed – the frozen product is dipped in water to form a glaze of ice that protects the flesh from freezer burn • Fancy – code word for previously frozen Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Chilled – used instead to “fresh” to indicate storage at proper refrigeration temperatures Between 30 ̊F – 34 ̊F
  8. • • • • • • Smell – like the ocean Eyes – clear not sunken or dried Gills – bright red Texture – moist, firm, slime Fins & scales – moist, not dry of falling off Appearance – moist, glistening, firm Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Purchasing Fish

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