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Classical French Cooking Methods
Roast – uncovered using hot dry air usually
in an oven
Bake – usually applies to bread,...
Classical French Cooking Methods
Dry Heat Cooking Methods with fat

Sauté – “to jump” small amount of fat
Chef Michael Sc...
Classical French Cooking Methods
Moist Heat Cooking Methods

202˚F above 5000 ft.)
Simmer – cook in liquid just under a b...
Classical French Cooking Methods
Moist Heat Cooking Methods

boiling but not directly in the water
Braise – cook covered ...
•Chef, Executive Chef or Chef de Cuisine
•Sous Chef
•Saucier –
Sauté Chef
•Poissonier –
Fish Chef
•Entremetier –
Vegetable...
• High protein meats and fish
•Carbohydrates must be present
• Starts around 230˚F
•Only during dry heat
Protein strands u...
Cooking Foods by Heat Transfer
• Conduction – When heat moves from one item to

something touching it or through an item
a...
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08 basic cooking methods

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Transcript of "08 basic cooking methods"

  1. 1. Classical French Cooking Methods Roast – uncovered using hot dry air usually in an oven Bake – usually applies to bread, pastries or fish also in an oven Broil – uses radiant heat from a source above product i.e. salamander Smoke – dry heat covered using wood chips to create smoke Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Dry Heat Cooking Methods
  2. 2. Classical French Cooking Methods Dry Heat Cooking Methods with fat Sauté – “to jump” small amount of fat Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder over high heat Pan-fry – moderate amount of fat over moderate heat Deep-fry – submerged in hot fat Pressure-fry – submerged in hot fat under pressure
  3. 3. Classical French Cooking Methods Moist Heat Cooking Methods 202˚F above 5000 ft.) Simmer – cook in liquid just under a boil Poach – slow cook in hot liquid should have no movement Blanch – partially cook in highly salted water usually followed by Shocking – submerge in ice water to stop the cooking process Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Boil – cook in hot liquid (212˚F at sea level
  4. 4. Classical French Cooking Methods Moist Heat Cooking Methods boiling but not directly in the water Braise – cook covered very slow in a small amount of liquid after primary browning. Liquid is usually made into the sauce Pressure cooking – cooking with steam at a very high temperature and pressure in a specialized piece of equipment Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Steam - cooking with the steam produced by
  5. 5. •Chef, Executive Chef or Chef de Cuisine •Sous Chef •Saucier – Sauté Chef •Poissonier – Fish Chef •Entremetier – Vegetable Chef •Rotisseur or Grillardin – Grill Chef •Garde Manger – Pantry Chef •Patissier – Pastry Chef •Tournant – Rounds man •Aboyeur – Expediter Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Classic French Brigade
  6. 6. • High protein meats and fish •Carbohydrates must be present • Starts around 230˚F •Only during dry heat Protein strands unwind and bond with carbohydrates as the temperature rises creating color and flavor. Too much color and flavor will result in a condition referred to as BURNT. Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Maillard Reaction
  7. 7. Cooking Foods by Heat Transfer • Conduction – When heat moves from one item to something touching it or through an item air or steam or liquid • Radiant – When energy is transferred by waves. The waves of energy do not cook the food but change into heat energy when they strike the food. Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Convection – When heat is spread by the movement of
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