Tx workshop b elements
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  • For PBPP We start with the basic characteristics Strategic Direction which basically indicates (Where do we want to go?) Long-Range Planning (How are we going to get there?) Programming (What will it take?) Implementation and Evaluation (How did we do?)Under strategic direction you will have - goals and maybe quantifiable objectives that guide decision making and Performance measures that capture these goals and objectivesNext under long range planning targets can be set - though its important to recognize the challenge in defining meaningful targets in all areas and tracking progress over time or performance monitoring and Identifying and evaluating strategies will guide investment and policy decisions made by transportation agenciesMaking the link to programming requires understanding- The set of actions, strategies, and investments that you can use to improve performance and The expected impact of those strategies so that resource constrained achievable targets can be setFinally Successful Performance-Based planning will require thinking about implementation and reporting and monitoring. Some key questions about the overall process areHow to capture the link between long range plans and actual investments in a TIP or STIPAre projects being delivered that are consistent with planning directions
  • For PBPP We start with the basic characteristics Strategic Direction which basically indicates (Where do we want to go?) Long-Range Planning (How are we going to get there?) Programming (What will it take?) Implementation and Evaluation (How did we do?)Under strategic direction you will have - goals and maybe quantifiable objectives that guide decision making and Performance measures that capture these goals and objectivesNext under long range planning targets can be set - though its important to recognize the challenge in defining meaningful targets in all areas and tracking progress over time or performance monitoring and Identifying and evaluating strategies will guide investment and policy decisions made by transportation agenciesMaking the link to programming requires understanding- The set of actions, strategies, and investments that you can use to improve performance and The expected impact of those strategies so that resource constrained achievable targets can be setFinally Successful Performance-Based planning will require thinking about implementation and reporting and monitoring. Some key questions about the overall process areHow to capture the link between long range plans and actual investments in a TIP or STIPAre projects being delivered that are consistent with planning directions
  • Goal areas are more defined broadly, recognizing that goals are defined by individual transportation agencies
  • Objectives are specific, measurable statements related to the attainment of goals. Several objectives are usually identified for each goal, as illustrated on the slide
  • In the PBPP, a good objective should include or lead to development of a performance measure that can be tracked over time and is used to assess different investment or policy alternatives. An objective is a specific, measureable statement that supports a goal. Objectives may be SMART (specific, measureable, agreed-upon, realistic, time-bound). There are various types of objectives that can be utilized, as shown on this slide. It is critical to involve the public in developing goals and objectives as a strategic foundation for a performance-based approach to decision-makingThis should be a key effort under the agencies Public Involvement strategy
  • Measures are part of a management system of inputs – outputs – outcomes.For a transportation agency, inputs are the staff, materials, users and other factors; the raw material the agency has to work withOutputs are the projects, policy decisions, and investmentsAnd outcomes are what the agency achieves.Inputs and outputs are more or less under and agency control, but outcomes are often influenced by other factors, especially in areas like congestion and safetyPerformance management attempts to drive the efficient and effective use of inputs and outputs by focusing on current and future outcomes
  • SEMCOG has a process used in their long range plan and STIP that conducts tradeoff analysis across several program areas. the process uses performance measures in each area that are generally consistent with current discussions at the federal level Options from the tradeoff analysis are presented to decision makers
  • The connecting tissue between performance based planning and programming and transportation performance management is target setting. The target setting process is a coordinated process between stakeholders that should Identify trends and targetsIdentify Strategies and Analyze AlternativesDevelop Investment Priorties
  • Target setting is an important aspect of performance management but also a challenging one.It is challenging to set targets for some goal areas and measures.Many agencies discuss aspirational targets – like zero deaths. These targets are more descriptions of goals than specific targets. Targets typically are set based on both a desired change and an understanding of the resources required to achieve the target.A recent NCHRP effort tackled target setting and provides detailed guidance to agencies on target setting. These include technical approaches (such as modeling), consensus or customer oriented approaches to target setting that may result in aspirational or unachievable targets, and benchmarking.
  • Source: MTC, http://www.onebayarea.org/pdf/PerfTargetsSCS-RTP.pdfHere is an example of target setting from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) forthe nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.Notice how the specificity of the targets.
  • MnDOT uses performance criteria to guide capital investments and annual operational budgets. Transportation system and agency performance reports are regularly reviewed by MnDOT management. The ongoing measurement and review process assists MnDOT in evaluating the efficiency of service delivery and assessing the effectiveness of program activities. This objective based approach increases transparency, and encourages innovation by keeping the focus on outcomes. Establishing realistic performance targets is key to Mn/DOT's performance-based planning process. Mn/DOT believes that targets should be "realistic." Setting targets too high can lead to over-investment and non-attainment. Setting targets too low can lead to underinvestment and a system that does not meet customer expectations. Mn/DOT used trend-based projections to estimate levels of performance, based on an extrapolation of recent trends. Policy-based targets are set to achieve desired performance levels, based on policy or customer expectations. The long-term targets were not constrained by current funding levels, but were expected to be attainable under some reasonable achievable, increased future funding scenario.http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/performance_based_planning/resources/white_paper/wp02.cfmhttp://www.dot.state.mn.us/measures/pdf/2011_Scorecard_10-19-12.pdf
  • Performance-driven resource allocation is one of the most fundamental uses of performance measurement, though it is often the last element of an agency’s performance-based process to develop.The resource allocation step of performance management is meant to address not just funding of projects, but also key policy and strategy decisions made by an agency. Many areas of performance, like safety, will be improved not just by making transportation investments, but also by enacting legislation and changing behaviors.A performance-based approach to resource allocation requires agencies to understand the relationship between actions/investments and future performance. These are the critical components of a performance-based planning process.However, performance measures are not intended to replace the current transportation project prioritization and selection processes, but rather serve as a valuable input into the process. Other factors, such as equity, need to be considered in the final analysis.
  • SEMCOG has a process used in their long range plan and STIP that conducts tradeoff analysis across several program areas. the process uses performance measures in each area that are generally consistent with current discussions at the federal level Options from the tradeoff analysis are presented to decision makersFour program areas – pavement, bridge, delay, and safety – are shown here. Similar chart also developed for Nonmotorized investments, but not shown here Each chart shows the relationship between expected performance and funding. Light blue dot shows current performance expectation and green dot shows maximum achievable performance Decision makers use these graphs to trade off among investments within a constrained budget, using the information about expected performance outcomesSEMCOG also tracks investments in the STIP against the proposed program levels from the long range plan, which are based on the tradeoff. This allows the MPO to understand if projects are being implemented that are consistent with what was decided in the LRP
  • MTC has a very thorough project evaluation process in which projects are assessed on their ability to advance the 10 performance targets and their cost-effectiveness.Basically, project performance assessment helps illuminate outliers (high-performers and low-performers)These three bubble charts (from a January 2012 memo) show results.
  • An importantascpect of map-21 that further ties the performance based planning and programming process with the transportaiton performance management process is reporting. The process of monitoring, evaluation, and reporting is critical to the success of MAP21
  • Monitoring and ReportingTracking performance over timeDeveloping dashboards, performance reports, and other methods for internal and external presentation of findingsEvaluationHave the strategies and investments pursued been successful?Using this review to improve the tools and methods used to forecast future performance
  • Investment plans include highway and other modes and specific district investment plans. The highway investment plan makes the most extensive use of performance measures and performance-based planning approaches, but all plans follow the same basic techniques.The highway investment plan has three time frames (5-year, 10-year, and 20-year)
  • WHAT IS SCENARIO PLANNING?So what is scenario planning?Scenario planning has been defined in many different ways. In fact, it was originally used in a military context and then was adopted by businesses, government, and non-government organizations. The images are examples from previous workshops…The application of scenario planning to address transportation and land use emerged over time, with early efforts beginning in the 1960s. Over time, the application of transportation scenario planning has become much more common. FHWA & FTA has collected numerous examples nationwide of transportation agencies' use of the technique – Brian Betlyon will be talking about a few of these examples in a little bit.For FHWA & FTA , scenario planning is a process that can help assess and prepare for possible conditions using multiple plausible stories about the future. Through comparing develops a common understanding of health, economic, environmental, and land use issues, all of which may affect transportation. It identifies the driving forces of changes that affect communities. These forces of changes could include:Demographics.Land use patterns.Climate change.Economic shifts.Technological innovations.Alternative energy use.Overall, we see scenario planning as an enhancement of, not a replacement for, the traditional transportation planning process. It is a flexible technique that can be adapted for many purposes, scales, and issues, and can be used in many different types of areas.
  • http://www.dot.state.mn.us/strategicvision/vision.htmlCore Values Maintain safety as a priorityEnhance trust with transparency and accountabilityPromote collaboration, research and innovation Value diversity and cultural capital through inclusion and opportunityCommit to employee well-being, development and success Recognize that employees are integral to MnDOT’s success
  • http://www.iowadot.gov/jobs/missionvision.htmlMissionThe Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) advocates and delivers transportation services that support the economic, environmental and social vitality of Iowa. Guiding principlesThe Iowa DOT holds the following principles as critical to successfully fulfilling our mission and achieving our vision. Integrity - Our dealings with each other, and our partners and customers are conducted to the highest ethical standard.Transparency - Our decisions, actions and processes are open, accessible and understandable - both internally and externally.Outstanding Service - We provide excellent service by: 1) continually developing our skills, tools and expertise; 2) forming internal external partnerships; 3) finding innovative methods of doing things better; and 4) adapting rapidly to opportunities and challenges.Quality Work Culture - Our employees are safe, respected and treated equitably; diversity is promoted to enrich and strengthen the workforce; and employees are given opportunities for personal and professional growth.
  • http://www.wmata.com/momentum/WMATA_Strategy_Plan_brochure.pdf“Guide to the Strategic Framework” - 2012
  • Goal areas are more defined broadly, recognizing that goals are defined by individual transportation agencies
  • At CDTC, the New Vision 2030 Transportation Plan is based on over 30 principles, which are captured under these four main categories. To achieve these goals, CDTC developed a set of 13 strategies and over 40 actions. CDTC uses a network-level performance measurement approach to help define regional goals and the full range of strategies necessary to meet them. In a network approach, goals and performance measures are not tied to a particular mode or funding category, but are developed based on the big picture needs of the area.
  • To support long-range planning and development of PLAN 2040, ARC established a new performance-based planning process to guide project and program selection and communicate how transportation investment decisions are made. The performance framework is organized around four Key Decision Points (KDPs) in the long-range plan development process requiring some level of resource allocation decision. KDP 1 involves a set of plan-level performance measures to conduct program-level scenario analysis . KDP 3 applies another set of mode-specific performance measures to assess the relative performance of potential roadway expansion and transit expansion projects, respectively. Plan-level measures are used to evaluate different funding allocation scenarios and communicate the benefits and costs of those funding scenarios to inform policy. They reflect the cumulative impact of total investment strategies. Plan-level measures also are used to help weigh tradeoffs across the RTP Emphasis Areas at a system level. The key outcome of the KDP 1 analysis is a preferred funding allocation of constrained revenue across each of the program areas.Project-level measures are used to evaluate specific projects within road and transit capacity programs to provide a relative comparison between road projects and a relative comparison between transit projects, separately. These measures are used to inform decisions about which projects to include in the RTP.
  • Plan-level measures are used to evaluate different funding allocation scenarios and communicate the benefits and costs of those funding scenarios to inform policy. They reflect the cumulative impact of total investment strategies. Plan-level measures also are used to help weigh tradeoffs across the RTP Emphasis Areas at a system level. The key outcome of the KDP 1 analysis is a preferred funding allocation of constrained revenue across each of the program areas.
  • While these are not SMART objectives, if you combine the Policies with the Targets you get the same thing.

Tx workshop b elements Tx workshop b elements Presentation Transcript

  • Key Elements of PerformanceBased Planning and Programming Performance-Based Planning and Programming Workshop Texas 1
  • Module Topics • Elements of Performance-Based Planning        Visioning Goals Objectives Performance Measures Targets Resource Allocation Reporting 2
  • Objectives • Explain use of goals, objectives, and performance measures in planning • Explain the difference between aspirational and realistic targets • Understand how performance measures support tradeoff decisions and resource allocation • Describe how monitoring and reporting can help to improve a performance-based process 3
  • PLANNING Strategic Direction Where do we want to go? Quality Data and Public Involvement Goals and Objectives Performance Measures Analysis How are we going to get there? Identify Trends and Targets Identify Strategies and Analyze Alternatives Develop Investment Priorities Investment Plan Monitoring Resource Allocation Evaluation Program of Projects Reporting Programming What will it take? Implementation and Evaluation How did we do? PERFORMANCE-BASED PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING
  • PLANNING Strategic Direction Where do we want to go? Quality Data and Public Involvement Goals and Objectives Performance Measures Analysis How are we going to get there? Identify Trends and Targets Identify Strategies and Analyze Alternatives Develop Investment Priorities Investment Plan Monitoring Resource Allocation Evaluation Program of Projects Reporting Programming What will it take? Implementation and Evaluation How did we do? PERFORMANCE-BASED PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING
  • Definitions • Vision: Long term, desired future for the transportation system • Goals: Generalized statements that broadly relate the physical environment to values • Objectives: Specific measurable statements related to the attainment of goals 6
  • Goals • Vision: Long term, desired future for the transportation system • Goals: Generalized statements that broadly relate the physical environment to values • Objectives: Specific measurable statements related to the attainment of goals 7
  • TxDOT Goals  Maintain a safe system  Address congestion  Connect Texas communities  Become best-in-class state agency 8
  • CAMPO 2035 Plan Goal Areas 9
  • Atlanta Regional Commission 2040 Long Range Plan Goals • Lead as the Global Gateway to the South • Encourage Healthy Communities • Expand Access to Community Resources 10
  • Objectives • Vision: Long term, desired future for the transportation system • Goals: Generalized statements that broadly relate the physical environment to values • Objectives: Specific measurable statements related to the attainment of goals 11
  • Objectives: Relation to Goals Goal B Goal A Objective A-1 Objective A-2 SubObjective A-2-a Objective A-3 Objective B-1 Goal C Objective B-2 Objective C-1 SubObjective A-2-b 12
  • Chattanooga TPO 2040 RTP Within Community Community to Region Region to Region Region to Region Objectives • Preserve, maintain, and improve existing infrastructure before adding new capacity • Support continued economic growth of the region by improving intermodal connections that reduce delay for both people and goods • Reduce delay on critical regional thoroughfares with minimal impact to community, historic and environmental resources • Improve the efficiency and reliability of freight, cargo, and goods movement by reducing delay on corridors critical to freight movement • Improve travel time reliability through improved system operations 13
  • Objectives • Objective = specific, measurable statement that supports achievement of a goal • Example: Reduce pedestrian fatalities (by 10 percent by 2025) • Types of objectives: • Outcome: reflects concerns of the public (e.g., incident-based delay) • Output: reflects actions that affect outcomes (e.g., clearance time of incidents) • Activity: reflects actions taken by transportation agencies (e.g., number of cameras tracking system conditions) • It is critical to involve the public in developing goals and objectives as a strategic foundation for a performancebased approach to decision-making
  • “SMART” Objectives • Specific: Sufficiently descriptive but not dictating approach • Measurable: Quantitative (number, degree) • Agreed: Consensus on meaning and value • Realistic: Can be accomplished with expected resources • Time-bound: Identifies timeframe 15
  • Maryland SHA Objectives FY 2012-2015 Business Plan Key Performance Area Example SMART Objectives Safety Reduce the annual number of traffic related fatalities on all roads in MD from 592 in 2008 to 475 or fewer (19.8% reduction) by December 31, 2015 Mobility/Economy Achieve an annual user cost savings of at least $1.1 billion as a result of congestion management System Preservation and Maintain annually at least 84% of the SHA pavement Maintenance network in acceptable overall pavement condition (cracking, rutting, and ride) 16
  • Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission 2012-2035 MTP View other MORPC Goals and Objectives: http://morpc.org/pdf/2012MTP_ExecSummary_May.pdf 17
  • PLANNING Strategic Direction Where do we want to go? Quality Data and Public Involvement Goals and Objectives Performance Measures Analysis How are we going to get there? Identify Trends and Targets Identify Strategies and Analyze Alternatives Develop Investment Priorities Investment Plan Monitoring Resource Allocation Evaluation Program of Projects Reporting Programming What will it take? Implementation and Evaluation How did we do? PERFORMANCE-BASED PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING
  • Performance Measures Provide a Means to Evaluate • Performance monitoring – How well current system meets objectives • Performance evaluation – Evaluation of future plans or strategies Goal A Objective A-1 PM A-1a PM A-1b Objective A-2 Objective A-3 PM A-2a PM A-3a 19
  • Types of Performance Measures • Outcome measure: impact of actions and activities on actual system conditions/performance  Percent of pavement in good condition • Output measures: amount of activity accomplished  Number of lane miles resurfaced in a 5-year period • Most agencies need and use both output and outcome measures • Focus of performance management is on outcomes 20
  • SEMCOG: Incorporating Measures into the Planning Process Program Area Performance Measure Pavement Preservation Percent of pavement in good or fair condition Highway Capacity Hours of delay per 1,000 vehicle miles Bridge Preservation Percent of bridges in good or fair condition Safety Fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles Transit Extent of transit network Nonmotorized Population % within ½ mile of a facility 21
  • Champaign Urbana MPO 2035 LRTP Measures Goal #6: To provide facilities for nonauto modes of transportation in order to improve mobility and decrease the number of vehicles on our roadways Objective 2: Increase local transit ridership by at least 5% by 2014 Objective 3: Increase the number of enplanements at Willard Airport by at least 10% by 2014 Objective 4: Increase the number of Amtrak boardings at Illinois Terminal by at least 15% by 2014 Annual Transit Ridership Annual Enplanements Annual Ridership at Illinois Terminal Number of Transit Routes Number of Flights Frequency of Trains per day 22
  • MAP-21: National Goal Areas and Performance Measures National Goal Areas National Performance Measure Areas Safety Serious injuries & fatalities (# and per VMT) Infrastructure Condition Pavement & bridge condition (Interstate and non-Interstate NHS) Congestion Reduction Traffic Congestion System Reliability Performance (Interstate and nonInterstate NHS) Freight Movement and Economic Vitality Interstate freight movement Environmental Sustainability On-road mobile source emissions Reduced Project Delivery Delays None Transit State of Good Repair TBD/None Transit Safety TBD/None
  • PLANNING Strategic Direction Where do we want to go? Quality Data and Public Involvement Goals and Objectives Performance Measures Analysis How are we going to get there? Identify Trends and Targets Identify Strategies and Analyze Alternatives Develop Investment Priorities Investment Plan Monitoring Resource Allocation Evaluation Program of Projects Reporting Programming What will it take? Implementation and Evaluation How did we do? PERFORMANCE-BASED PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING
  • Target Setting • Key question – Aspirational or vision-based targets vs. evidence-based targets • No single approach appropriate for all areas • MAP-21 requires evidence-based targets – what do you expect to achieve 25
  • MTC Targets for Sustainable Community Strategy/RTP • Goal Area: Transportation System Effectiveness  Targets • Decrease average per-trip travel time by 10% • Increase local road pavement condition (PCI) to 75 or better • Decrease distressed lane-miles of state highways to less than 10% of total lane-miles • Reduce average transit asset age to 50% of useful life 26
  • Minnesota DOT Target Example 27
  • PLANNING Strategic Direction Where do we want to go? Quality Data and Public Involvement Goals and Objectives Performance Measures Analysis How are we going to get there? Identify Trends and Targets Identify Strategies and Analyze Alternatives Develop Investment Priorities Investment Plan Monitoring Resource Allocation Evaluation Program of Projects Reporting Programming What will it take? Implementation and Evaluation How did we do? PERFORMANCE-BASED PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING
  • Resource Allocation • Resources include investments in infrastructure, staffing decisions, and policy/strategy decisions • Performance-based investment decision making requires an understanding of …  The strategies that are likely to improve performance  The impacts of these strategies on expected performance  Data and tools to be able to measure or estimate these impacts 29
  • Performance-Based Approaches to Resource Allocation Investment Scenarios Project-Level Evaluation • Assess how investment decisions today impact longterm performance • Evaluate the effectiveness of projects and strategies to achieve performance targets • Evaluate and compare scenarios and investment tradeoffs to achieve desired performance • Prioritize projects and estimate investment needs • Actively engage stakeholders and decisionmakers • Actively engage stakeholders and decisionmakers 30
  • Example - SEMCOG 1 Examine the relationship between program-level investment and performance 2 Pavement 3 Delay Examine scenarios that vary funding by program area; adopt a preferred scenario  Preservation focused  Transit focused  Public preference driven Track performance over time; track investments against the adopted scenario Project Type Planned Funding Actual Funding Bridge 5% 5.2% Nonmotorized 1% 1.1% 24% 14.5% Road Expansion Bridge 8% 3.5% Safety 1% 0.6% Transit Capital 8% 7.0% 53% 68.1% 100.0% 100.0% Pavement Safety Operating Total
  • MTC Project-Level Assessment 32
  • MTC Performance Assessment to Achieve Congestion Reduction Target • Congestion reduction goal 33
  • PLANNING Strategic Direction Where do we want to go? Quality Data and Public Involvement Goals and Objectives Performance Measures Analysis How are we going to get there? Identify Trends and Targets Identify Strategies and Analyze Alternatives Develop Investment Priorities Investment Plan Monitoring Resource Allocation Evaluation Program of Projects Reporting Programming What will it take? Implementation and Evaluation How did we do? PERFORMANCE-BASED PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING
  • Reporting Examples 2013 Annual Attainment Report Maryland DOT The Gray Notebook Washington DOT Quarterly Performance Scorecard North Carolina DOT State of the System 2005 Bay Area Transportation Dashboard Virginia DOT State of the System Oregon DOT Tracker Missouri DOT 35
  • Example – Mn/DOT Multimodal Plan Investment Plans Supports Minnesota GO 50-year vision. Establishes objectives & strategies to guide investment Integrates performance planning & risk assessment to establish priorities for projected funding. Measures impact of investments on performance targets. Performance Monitoring Regular review of performance in each policy area 36
  • Getting Started with PBPP • Build on what you have • Develop a Regional or Statewide Vision of the topic not just jurisdiction by jurisdiction • Involve partners when defining objectives & strategies • Refine objectives over time • Refine process or get more realistic over time 37
  • DISCUSSION 38
  • SUPPLEMENTAL SLIDES
  • VISIONING
  • Visioning  Strategic planning process, focused on setting goals and objectives  May include scenario planning, considering multiple plausible outcomes for the future  Develops a common understanding of issues and driving forces of change that affect transportation  Helps assess and prepare for possible future conditions 41
  • Vision Examples “Visionary leadership for sustainable growth by balancing environmental responsibility, economic growth and social needs while maximizing benefits to all.” Atlanta Regional Commission, PLAN 2040 42
  • Vision Examples “Global leader in transportation, committed to upholding public needs and collaboration with internal and external partners to create a safe, efficient and sustainable transportation system for the future.” Minnesota DOT 43
  • Vision Examples “Making a difference in the lives of Iowans through stewardship, service and innovation.” Iowa DOT 44
  • Vision Examples “Metro moves the region forward by connecting communities and improving mobility for our customers.” Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority 45
  • GOALS
  • Metropolitan Transportation Commission Transportation 2035 Plan Goal Areas • • • • • • • • Maintenance & Safety Reliability Efficient Freight Travel Security and Emergency Management Clean Air Climate Protection Equitable Access Livable Communities 47
  • Capital District Transportation Committee New Vision 2030 Transportation Plan Goals • Preserve and manage the existing investment in the region’s transportation system • Develop the region’s potential to grow into a uniquely attractive, vibrant, and diverse metropolitan area • Link transportation and land use planning to meet the Plans goals for urban investment, concentrated development patterns, and smart economic growth • Plan and build for all modes of transportation, including pedestrian, bicycle, public transit, cars, and trucks 48
  • OBJECTIVES
  • Objectives in the Planning Process Stage of Planning Process Examples Goal(s) Improve transportation system reliability / reduce unexpected traveler delay Objectives Reduce incident-based delay so that by 2010, travelers experience… Improve transit system reliability so that by 2020, at least 95% of buses operate on-schedule… Performance Measures • Average incident duration (mean minutes per incident) • Vehicle hours of non-recurring delay due to incidents • Percentage of buses more than 5 minutes off schedule • Number of bus breakdowns/ major delays Strategies • Traffic cameras and detection systems to identify incidents more quickly • Roving incident response teams •GPS systems to track transit buses •Improved traveler information on transit services Projects/ Implementation • Install traffic cameras on Route X (2009) • Install variable message signs on Route X (2010) • Implement Incident Clearance Teams on Route X (2010) • Install GPS locator system for bus system (2010) • Install “Next Bus” electronic signs along major commuter corridors (2011) 50
  • Metropolitan Transportation Commission Transportation 2035 Plan Objectives • • • • • • • • Improve condition of assets Reduce collisions and fatalities Reduce delay Reduce security vulnerability Improve emergency preparedness Reduce vehicle travel Reduce emissions Improve affordability 51
  • New Hampshire DOT Balanced Scorecard Objectives 52
  • Maryland SHA Objectives (cont’d) FY 2012-2015 Business Plan Key Performance Area Example SMART Objectives Managing Our Agency Annually, sustain the number of lost work days due to workplace injuries at 17 or less per 100 employees Environmental Compliance & Stewardship Improve construction monitoring, inspection and close-out processes to ensure 100% compliance with environmental standards and regulations Customer Communications, Service & Satisfaction Biennially, attain an overall customer (registered MD driver) satisfaction composite rating of at least 4 “satisfied” on a 5-point scale 53
  • PERFORMANCE MEASURES
  • Atlanta 2040 RTP Performance Framework Plan-Level Measures Project-Level Measures 55
  • Atlanta 2040 RTP Plan-Level Measures RTP Emphasis Area Plan-Level Measure Description Mobility Average Commute Time Average travel time by auto and transit for HBW trip per commuter Connections/Access Activity/Employment Center Travel Shed Average number of workers reaching major activity/employment centers within 45 minutes (autos and transit) Safety Injury/Fatal Crash Rate Number of injury and fatal crashes per 100M VMT Economic Growth Jobs and Growth Change in GDP and jobs for the region resulting from travel time (delay) savings (Peak-hour freeway speed: managed lanes, HOV versus general purpose; Cost Savings Annual congestion cost savings Community/Environment Emissions NOx, VOC, PM2.5, and GHG State of Good Repair Roadway and Transit Condition Percent of pavement, bridge, and transit infrastructure in good condition 56
  • REPORTING