Educating the naive patient

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Educating the naive patient

  1. 1. Educating the naïve patient: From harm reduction to benefit maximization<br />Amanda Reiman MSW PhD<br />Director of Research<br />Berkeley Patients Group<br />
  2. 2. Today’s talk<br />Demographic trends in the medical cannabis population: age and experience<br />Meeting the needs of this patient group<br />Harm reduction AND Benefit maximization: Education, implementation, evaluation<br />Next steps…<br />
  3. 3. Trends in the patient population<br />N=304 anonymous surveys collected at BPG at intake (2010)<br />74% male, 57% White, Mean age is 32.<br />75% use cannabis for a pain related condition. <br />86 patients reported more than one condition.<br />Almost 20% of new patients have used cannabis for the first time in the past 6 months.<br />Significantly more likely to be Latino/a or African American (p<.01). <br />
  4. 4. Deviations from previous data<br />Almost 20% of new patients have used cannabis for the first time in the past 6 months.<br />Mean age is 32.<br />Previous data from BPG patients (N=350) revealed a mean age of 39 (2008).<br />Explanations…<br />Focusing on the naïve patient…<br />
  5. 5. Cannabis naïve patients…<br />Come to cannabis for various reasons<br />Lack of success with traditional treatment; catastrophic illness; beliefs about pharmaceuticals<br />Do not possess the language to express their needs<br />knowledge of the various preparations or methods of ingestion, strains, etc.<br />May not have a guide to lead them through the process of selection and ingestion<br />Important in learning to reduce harm and maximize benefits<br />Might be intimidated and have pre-conceived, propaganda based notions of cannabis<br />
  6. 6. Harm reduction and Benefit maximization<br />Two sides of the same coin<br />Harm reduction: reducing the chance of a negative experience from using cannabis<br />Benefit maximization: increasing the chance of a positive experience from using cannabis<br />
  7. 7. Harm Reduction<br />Negative experiences from cannabis use can occur<br />anxiety, upset stomach, rapid heart rate (more common in naïve users)<br />Legal sanctions<br />The importance of set and setting<br />Dispensaries play an important role<br />Information about dependence and withdrawal should be presented honestly.<br />Navigating patient status among friends, family, employers, etc. (especially younger patients)<br />
  8. 8. Benefit Maximization<br />Cost-effectiveness<br />Make each dollar count!<br />Symptom specific medicine<br />Efficacy and efficiency!<br />Method of ingestion<br />Salves….who knew?<br />
  9. 9. Next steps…<br />Cannabis 101 (EDUCATION)<br />Language<br />Demystification<br />Legal review<br />How to handle negative experiences<br />Dependence and withdrawal<br />Industry professionals should also receive education on answering “basic” questions<br />Guide to medicate with patient for the first time (IMPLEMENTATION)<br />Patient liaison on site<br />Workshops on assessing the effects of cannabis (EVALUATION)<br />Effects Method class<br />
  10. 10. Questions?<br />Amanda@berkeleypatientsgroup.com<br />

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