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Miao
Miao
Miao
Miao
Miao
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Miao

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PPT for ARIN6912 Week 6

PPT for ARIN6912 Week 6

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  • 1. Media Translation & Thinking
  • 2.  The new medium checks our immense effect having lived to come into being.  The new medium has affected our life tremendously.
  • 3. “Media Translation”  Print document electronic text  An act of interpretation  Something is gained as well as lost “textuality”
  • 4. “Textuality” What is text? Traditional, editor’s view:  text— a compound of matter,concept and action; but has no substantial/material existence: no colour,font size,shape or page replacement (Shillingsburg)  A textual hierarchy——Notions of “work”, “text” and “document” in print bibliographic studies (Anna Gunder)
  • 5. A textual hierarchy Work — “abstract artistic entity”; ideal constructions Text — manifest work through specific sign system Document — physical artifact merging with sign system
  • 6. Recognising Textuality Conclusion:  The majority of editors and literary scholars assume the definitions of “work”, “text” and “document” are almost the same; “Ideal” work  They only focus on print media; Differences between print and electronic media are overlooked
  • 7. Recognising Textuality  Differences between print and electronic 1. Stability  Print: After ink is impressed on paper, it remains stable and immovable  Electronic: does not exist until it is displayed on the screen
  • 8. Recognising Textuallity Differences between print and electronic 2. Storage & Delivery Vehicles  Print: the same  Electronic texts: maybe different e.g. data files on one server while the machine creating the display in another location many possible variations in electronic text
  • 9. Recognising Textuallity Differences between print and electronic 3. Prior existence vs Processural  Print : The print lines exist before the book is opened, read or understood.  An electronic text: have no prior existence; more like a process than an object
  • 10. Recognising Textuallity Similarity between print and electronic Similarity: Both print and electronic text is not physically self- identical  Print : No text is identical to any others —differences always exist between any two physical objects  Electronic: Delivery vehicles producing network texts are never the same twice — “they exist in momentary configurations as data packets are switched quickly from one node to another” (Katherine
  • 11. Recognising Textuallity Differences & similarity between print and electronic Conclusion: “Textuality is instantiated rather than dematerialialised, dispersed rather than unitary, processural rather than object-like, flickering ranther than durably imprinted.” Refine/ Revise our notion of materiality: e.g. precisely specify what a book is—impossible BECAUSE: As a physical object, it has uncountable physical characteristics. Each characteristic describe this book in a particular way
  • 12. Materiality  A way to think about text as embodied entities without falling into the chaos of infinite differences: materiality  Definition: The materiality of an embodied text is the interaction of its physical characteristics with its signifying strategies.  Differences between “document”, “text” and “work” appear
  • 13. Work as Assemblage (New framwork) Document 1 Document 2 Document 3 differences in materiality Text 1 (is sufficient) Text 2 Text 3 Text 4 similarities>differences clusters(near) clusters (far) eg.dif media Work
  • 14. References & Relevant Readings  A Chinese-English translating website. http://trans.netat.net/index.php  The “William Blake Archive” http://www.blakearchive.org/blake/public/a bout/glance/index.html  Beard, D. (2008). From work to text to document. Archival Science, 8(3).  Manonton, B. (2006). Searching and indexing text document based on topic identification. The university of winsconsin.
  • 15. Relevant Readings  Spencer, C. (2004). Use hidden text to easily create two different documents from one file. Inside Microsoft World,11(10).  Shinllingsburg, P. (2009). The dank cellar of electronic texts. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 24(1).  Sutherland, K. (2009). Material text, immaterial text and the electronic environment. . Literary and Linguistic Computing, 24(1).
  • 16. Relevant Readings  Sehgal, A. K. (2007). Profiling topics on the Web for knowledge discovery. The University of Iowa.  Dahlstrom, M. (2004). How Reproductive is a Scholarly Edition?. Literacy and Linguistic Computing, 19(1).  Dahlstrom, M. (2004).Electronic Scholarly Editing-Some Northern European Approaches. Literacy and Linguistic Computing, 19(1).

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