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Futurism
 

Futurism

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    Futurism Futurism Presentation Transcript

    • Futurism • international art movement founded in Italy in 1909 • contrast to Romanticism• speed, noise, machines, pollution, and cities • Fearing and attacking technology
    • • published by the poet Filippo Marinetti on the front page of the February 20, 1909, issue of Le Figaro• very first manifesto of this kind.
    • • Futurist painters made the rhythm of their repetitions of lines• Inspired by some photographic experiments, they were breaking motion into small sequences, and using the wide range of angles within a given time-frame all aimed to incorporate the dimension of time within the picture
    • • Brilliant colors and flowing brush strokes• mixed activism and artistic research• died out during the 1920s
    • Examples • Giacomo Balla (Italian, 1871-1958), Street Light (Lampada — Studio di luce), 1909, oil on canvas, 68 3/4 x 45 1/4 inches (174.7 x 114.7 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY. An extra-large image of this painting.
    • • Giacomo Balla, Speeding Automobile (Automobile in corsa), 1912, oil on wood, 21 7/8 x 27 1/8 inches (55.6 x 68.9 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.
    • • Giacomo Balla, Abstract Speed — The Car has Passed, 1913, oil on canvas, 50.2 x 65.4 cm, Tate Gallery, London.
    • • Giacomo Balla, Figure in Movement, 1913, pencil and waterc olor on paper, 22.5 x 29.5 cm, Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, Iran.
    • • Giacomo Balla, Swifts: Paths of Movement + Dynamic Sequences (Volo Rondini Grondaia Cielo), 1913, oil on canv as, 38 1/8 x 47 1/4 inches (96.8 x 120 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.
    • • Joseph Stella (American, 1877- 1946), Battle of Lights, Coney Island, c. 1913-14, oil on canvas, 39 x 29 1/2 inches, Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery and Sculpture Garden, U of Nebraska, Lincoln. One of very few American Futurists, Stellas contribution to Futurism is contained in a series of paintings celebrating the dynamism of New Yorks Brooklyn Bridge and Coney Island. This painting seems to be a kind of final synthesis of the series as a whole.
    • • Umberto Boccioni (Italian, 1882-1916), The City Rises (La città che sale / La ville qui monte), 1910, oil on canvas, 6 feet 6 1/2 inches x 9 feet 10 1/2 inches (199.3 x 301 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY. Boccioni also produced a Study for The City Rises, 1910, crayon, chalk and charcoal on paper, 23 1/8 x 34 1/8 inches (58.8 x 86.7 cm).
    • • Umberto Boccioni, The Laugh (La risata), 1911, oil on canvas, 43 3/8 x 57 1/4 inches (199.3 x 301 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.
    • • Gino Severini (Italian, 1883- 1966), Dynamic Hieroglyphic of the Bal Tabarin, 1912, oil on ca nvas with sequins, 63 5/8 x 61 1/2 inches (161.6 x 156.2 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.
    • • Gino Severini, Armored Train in Action (Train blindé en action), 1915, oil on canvas, 45 5/8 x 34 7/8 inches (115.8 x 88.5 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.
    • • Luigi Russolo (Italian, 1885- 1947), Dynamism of an Automobile, 1912- 1913, oil on canvas, 106 x 140 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris.
    • • Marcel Duchamp, The Passage from Virgin to Bride (Le passage de la vierge à la mariée, July- August, 1912, oil on canvas, 23 3/8 x 21 1/4 inches (59.4 x 54 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.