Lose Control by Holly Ross 10-19-07
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Keynote Presentation for MMT's Communicating in the Age of New Media II: Distributing Content 10-19-2007 ...

Keynote Presentation for MMT's Communicating in the Age of New Media II: Distributing Content 10-19-2007

Lose Control: Why and How Web 2.0 Matters to Nonprofits
This presentation offers a big picture view of how and why new media matters for nonprofits. It includes an overview of the major content distribution tools that are covered more fully in the breakout sessions that follow.

Presenter, Holly Ross, Incoming Executive Director, NTEN (Nonprofit Technology Network)

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  • How many people here have heard of Web 2.0? How many here are very excited about web 2.0? How many here never want to hear those words uttered again? Why? The idea of forecasting what’s going to happen next in technology is not easy. But I think I can give you a general sense of where we’re headed and some of the tools you can implement to make sure you end up there too…Oh, and why any of this actually matters. And I want you to know that fundamentally, everything I’m going to talk about here today is about Power. Here’s why – because Information is power. People with information are powerful. And powerful people can make change. And change is transformative. At the heart of every nonprofit’s work is giving information to individuals – information that will empower them to take action that will change their lives, the lives of their neighbors, and to transform their communities. You know that better than anyone. When you give a woman the information she needs to understand her rights as a tenant, to avoid eviction, and to stay off the streets, you’ve made her more powerful. When you help a person learn the small things they can do around their house to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, you’ve made them more powerful When you give anyone information, you give them power, and power is transformative. Now – everyone wants power. Not in a Machiavellian way. But no one wants to be helpless. So everyone wants information. So to understand where technology is headed, we have to look at how we’re getting and interacting with information. So with that…..
  • Because the Internet is how you connect to your future demographic. It’s cheap, it’s easy, and it’s ubiquitous. This last point is particularly important because the web won’t just mean computers and browsers in a few years. Web enabled phones, and other web enabled devices are already huge overseas and are gaining ground here. And, web 2.0 tools – typically light, small, and easy, are going to be huge in this arena.
  • Let’s take a trip in the way back machine. Way back. To before I started getting grey hair. Let’s go back to 1985. In 1985, the world was a fundamentally different place. And not just because of the cold war, OR the cola wars. It was a different place because the way we got knowledge was completely different. Knowledge was, in fact, almost a tangible thing. It had locations. You went to a library. You found a phone book (who even has a phone book now?). You went to a University. You found an expert. Knowledge was very physical. It was a fine system. Except there were a couple of problems. You had to know where to go to get our knowledge. Which is kind of a weird concept if you think about it. The prerequisite to knowing something is knowing where to find it. Even if you knew where to go, knowledge was tough to parse. Knowledge was created by “EXPERTS” who, having apparently mastered every other word in the english language, decide to invent entirely NEW dialects to sound even smarter. (Have you ever talked to a lawyer? Then you know what I mean). So unless you knew where to go, AND had an interpreter, it was kind of tough to get the knowledge you were looking for. Which leads me to my final problem with the OLD way… This is exactly why the nonprofit community was and is so pivotal. You guys are the translators. But it was a very high touch business, and translating face to face eats up a lot of resources. Then along came….
  • You guessed it. The Internet. All of a sudden…access to information is MUCH easier. Publishing is incredibly easy now, and not limited to the self referential “EXPERTS” in a field. People began to build thousands and thousand of pages of content meant to democratize the access to information – to make knowledge more available. So – you no longer had to know where to look, or what special terms to search for, or need a translator to find the knowledge you wanted. Well, sort of. That was probably true for about 13 seconds. And then the reverse problem started to emerge. Too MUCH information. Now, people needed a sherpa, not a translator. So people know where to go, and can find lots of knowledge, but they often still need an interpreter, and almost always need a guide to make sense of the abundance of information. So you’re still stuck in a high touch role. And that’s really the period we’re just starting to leave behind. The period of publishing. The information explosion.
  • So where are we? We’re at a time when YOU are still wielding all the power. But that’s all about to change. Again. Because, dare I say it, of the Internet.
  • This is where things are shifting. You are no longer the interpreter. You are a facilitator. You are a location where like-minded people know they can gather and have conversations.
  • Tools that bring people together. Tools that help people find the answers they need, when they need them. Tools that break down barriers to people and information.
  • Tools that CONNECT. WHY? Why is connection so important? Because the world has changed – we’re in the information age. People no longer need you to be an information destination. They don’t need you to tell them how many families have been displaced in Darfur. They don’t need you to tell them how to save energy with flourescent light bulbs. They don’t need you to give them best practices, or tips, or information of any kind. That’s what Google’s for. They don’t need you to TELL them anything. They need you to be a better broker of information. They need you to CONNECT them with the people, ideas, and resources they are looking for. And THEY want to define who those people are, what those ideas should be, and what resources they need. They don’t want you doing it for them. So you need to change. You don’t want to be a destination, you want to be a conduit.
  • LISTEN: Increase transparency and access
  • START CONVERSATIONS: Connect your community members to each other and to resources
  • SHARE CONTENT: Allow stakeholders to create their own experience with the organization
  • SHARE CONTENT: Allow stakeholders to create their own experience with the organization
  • Try these tools as an individual user. Get comfortable in their world. Understand what it’s like to be a newbie there. DOCUMENT your experience. Then when you’re ready to use the tool for your organization, you’ve got something to refer back to.
  • Now that we’ve got the 10,000 foot view under our belts, I’m going to focus on some of the practical application. I want you to see real examples of these tools, really understand how they work. You should walk away from this workshop with: A few solid, concrete tools that you can take back to your organization and implement The inspiration and confidence to navigate the world of web 2.0 A framework to understand if a tool is relevant for your organization As we look at each tool today, I’ll try to provide you with real examples of nonprofits who are on the cutting edge and are using these tools. We’ll look at ways they can be used by nonprofits for program, communications, and operations work.
  • How many of you know what a tag is? How many of you use tags? How many of you share tags? If needed: A tag is a new way of bookmarking – and it works for more than just web sites. You can tag almost any kind of online content, which makes it very useful. And, you choose what the tags are, so they are relevant to you. Like RSS feeds, tags are aggregated in a reader of some kind, so you can go see all the content you’ve tagged, and you can also share it out with others. Since you can share your tags, this is also often referred to as social bookmarking. Let’s see how it works: Check out my del.icio.us account. Get the home page of one of the participants – add it to the account. Note the url for an individual tag and how it can be shared. You can also use tags for photos. How many of you hold events? And take pictures at those events? Do you publish the pictures? Do other people take pictures at the events? With tags – everyone can be the official photographer, and you can publish the results of the COMMUNITY endeavor. 06NTC at flickr.
  • How many of you know what a tag is? How many of you use tags? How many of you share tags? If needed: A tag is a new way of bookmarking – and it works for more than just web sites. You can tag almost any kind of online content, which makes it very useful. And, you choose what the tags are, so they are relevant to you. Like RSS feeds, tags are aggregated in a reader of some kind, so you can go see all the content you’ve tagged, and you can also share it out with others. Since you can share your tags, this is also often referred to as social bookmarking. Let’s see how it works: Check out my del.icio.us account. Get the home page of one of the participants – add it to the account. Note the url for an individual tag and how it can be shared. You can also use tags for photos. How many of you hold events? And take pictures at those events? Do you publish the pictures? Do other people take pictures at the events? With tags – everyone can be the official photographer, and you can publish the results of the COMMUNITY endeavor. 06NTC at flickr.
  • How many of you know what a tag is? How many of you use tags? How many of you share tags? If needed: A tag is a new way of bookmarking – and it works for more than just web sites. You can tag almost any kind of online content, which makes it very useful. And, you choose what the tags are, so they are relevant to you. Like RSS feeds, tags are aggregated in a reader of some kind, so you can go see all the content you’ve tagged, and you can also share it out with others. Since you can share your tags, this is also often referred to as social bookmarking. How many of you hold events? And take pictures at those events? Do you publish the pictures? Do other people take pictures at the events? With tags – everyone can be the official photographer, and you can publish the results of the COMMUNITY endeavor. 06NTC at flickr.
  • How many of you know what a tag is? How many of you use tags? How many of you share tags? If needed: A tag is a new way of bookmarking – and it works for more than just web sites. You can tag almost any kind of online content, which makes it very useful. And, you choose what the tags are, so they are relevant to you. Like RSS feeds, tags are aggregated in a reader of some kind, so you can go see all the content you’ve tagged, and you can also share it out with others. Since you can share your tags, this is also often referred to as social bookmarking. How many of you hold events? And take pictures at those events? Do you publish the pictures? Do other people take pictures at the events? With tags – everyone can be the official photographer, and you can publish the results of the COMMUNITY endeavor. 06NTC at flickr.
  • How many of you know what RSS is? How many of you use an RSS reader? How many of you have an RSS feed on your website? If needed: RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary, depending on who you ask. There are tons of great explanations of what this is and how it works all over Techsoup.org etc. But basically, RSS allows information from a web site to be drawn out of the site, and re-displayed somewhere else. So, you don’t have to go to the New York Times Web site to read the headlines. You can use an RSS reader to pull in headlines from the NY Times, The Boston Globe and Entertainment Weekly in one place. The best part is, most sites set up their RSS feeds so that you don’t have to get ALL the headlines. You can get just the International, or just the tech headlines. It’s a VERY efficient way to gather information for our personal use, a great way to publish your information since readers won’t have to come to your site to get it’s information, and it’s an even better way to publish information on your site. The metaphor here is that the RSS reader is like a magnet that draws information together to create a customized experience for you. First, let’s see how you would use it as an end use – let’s look at some RSS feeds with a reader. Go to http://bloglines.com. holly@nten.org gobears. View and add feeds. You can also publish your own RSS feed on your site or blog, and now your stakeholders can add your feeds to their readers! Demo nten.org/events. You can do this on web sites – most content management systems have a feature for this now, but it varies from application to application. Finally – the last thing you can do is re-publish RSS feeds on your site: http://community.telecentre.org/ Telecentre.org is a venture of Canada's International Development Agency that is also receiving support from Microsoft and the Swiss government. Telecentres are community technology centres -- in many developing nations or in rural areas, this is often the only way people have Internet access, and may also be how they get access to phone service, too -- and training in how to use all these technologies. Local telecentres are supported by various regional networks around the world -- like CTCNet in the USA. But until now there's been no formal way for a network of telecentres in Africa to share resources with a network of telecentres in Latin America. Telecentre.org aims to change that by providing lots of training and networking opportunities -- and an online network to support learning and exchange among telecentre networks. Any telecentre network in the world can create its own web site as part of the telecentre network. And any telecentre training event can create a web site, too. All these individual web sites are tied together via RSS and tags. So for example, when telecentre.org conducted a major gathering of telecentre people at the World Summit on the Information Society, they set up a separate site at wsis.telecentre.org. The main telecentre site then subscribed to the RSS feed from the WSIS site, and republished selected content onto the main site. This site was tagged "WSIS" so it would be easy to organize and find on the main site, too. http://www.stateline.org/live/
  • How many of you know what RSS is? How many of you use an RSS reader? How many of you have an RSS feed on your website? If needed: RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary, depending on who you ask. There are tons of great explanations of what this is and how it works all over Techsoup.org etc. But basically, RSS allows information from a web site to be drawn out of the site, and re-displayed somewhere else. So, you don’t have to go to the New York Times Web site to read the headlines. You can use an RSS reader to pull in headlines from the NY Times, The Boston Globe and Entertainment Weekly in one place. The best part is, most sites set up their RSS feeds so that you don’t have to get ALL the headlines. You can get just the International, or just the tech headlines. It’s a VERY efficient way to gather information for our personal use, a great way to publish your information since readers won’t have to come to your site to get it’s information, and it’s an even better way to publish information on your site. The metaphor here is that the RSS reader is like a magnet that draws information together to create a customized experience for you. First, let’s see how you would use it as an end use – let’s look at some RSS feeds with a reader. Go to http://bloglines.com. holly@nten.org gobears. View and add feeds. You can also publish your own RSS feed on your site or blog, and now your stakeholders can add your feeds to their readers! Demo nten.org/events. You can do this on web sites – most content management systems have a feature for this now, but it varies from application to application. Finally – the last thing you can do is re-publish RSS feeds on your site: http://community.telecentre.org/ Telecentre.org is a venture of Canada's International Development Agency that is also receiving support from Microsoft and the Swiss government. Telecentres are community technology centres -- in many developing nations or in rural areas, this is often the only way people have Internet access, and may also be how they get access to phone service, too -- and training in how to use all these technologies. Local telecentres are supported by various regional networks around the world -- like CTCNet in the USA. But until now there's been no formal way for a network of telecentres in Africa to share resources with a network of telecentres in Latin America. Telecentre.org aims to change that by providing lots of training and networking opportunities -- and an online network to support learning and exchange among telecentre networks. Any telecentre network in the world can create its own web site as part of the telecentre network. And any telecentre training event can create a web site, too. All these individual web sites are tied together via RSS and tags. So for example, when telecentre.org conducted a major gathering of telecentre people at the World Summit on the Information Society, they set up a separate site at wsis.telecentre.org. The main telecentre site then subscribed to the RSS feed from the WSIS site, and republished selected content onto the main site. This site was tagged "WSIS" so it would be easy to organize and find on the main site, too. http://www.stateline.org/live/
  • How many of you know what RSS is? How many of you use an RSS reader? How many of you have an RSS feed on your website? If needed: RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary, depending on who you ask. There are tons of great explanations of what this is and how it works all over Techsoup.org etc. But basically, RSS allows information from a web site to be drawn out of the site, and re-displayed somewhere else. So, you don’t have to go to the New York Times Web site to read the headlines. You can use an RSS reader to pull in headlines from the NY Times, The Boston Globe and Entertainment Weekly in one place. The best part is, most sites set up their RSS feeds so that you don’t have to get ALL the headlines. You can get just the International, or just the tech headlines. It’s a VERY efficient way to gather information for our personal use, a great way to publish your information since readers won’t have to come to your site to get it’s information, and it’s an even better way to publish information on your site. The metaphor here is that the RSS reader is like a magnet that draws information together to create a customized experience for you. First, let’s see how you would use it as an end use – let’s look at some RSS feeds with a reader. Go to http://bloglines.com. holly@nten.org gobears. View and add feeds. You can also publish your own RSS feed on your site or blog, and now your stakeholders can add your feeds to their readers! Demo nten.org/events. You can do this on web sites – most content management systems have a feature for this now, but it varies from application to application. Finally – the last thing you can do is re-publish RSS feeds on your site: http://community.telecentre.org/ Telecentre.org is a venture of Canada's International Development Agency that is also receiving support from Microsoft and the Swiss government. Telecentres are community technology centres -- in many developing nations or in rural areas, this is often the only way people have Internet access, and may also be how they get access to phone service, too -- and training in how to use all these technologies. Local telecentres are supported by various regional networks around the world -- like CTCNet in the USA. But until now there's been no formal way for a network of telecentres in Africa to share resources with a network of telecentres in Latin America. Telecentre.org aims to change that by providing lots of training and networking opportunities -- and an online network to support learning and exchange among telecentre networks. Any telecentre network in the world can create its own web site as part of the telecentre network. And any telecentre training event can create a web site, too. All these individual web sites are tied together via RSS and tags. So for example, when telecentre.org conducted a major gathering of telecentre people at the World Summit on the Information Society, they set up a separate site at wsis.telecentre.org. The main telecentre site then subscribed to the RSS feed from the WSIS site, and republished selected content onto the main site. This site was tagged "WSIS" so it would be easy to organize and find on the main site, too. http://www.stateline.org/live/
  • How many of you know what RSS is? How many of you use an RSS reader? How many of you have an RSS feed on your website? If needed: RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary, depending on who you ask. There are tons of great explanations of what this is and how it works all over Techsoup.org etc. But basically, RSS allows information from a web site to be drawn out of the site, and re-displayed somewhere else. So, you don’t have to go to the New York Times Web site to read the headlines. You can use an RSS reader to pull in headlines from the NY Times, The Boston Globe and Entertainment Weekly in one place. The best part is, most sites set up their RSS feeds so that you don’t have to get ALL the headlines. You can get just the International, or just the tech headlines. It’s a VERY efficient way to gather information for our personal use, a great way to publish your information since readers won’t have to come to your site to get it’s information, and it’s an even better way to publish information on your site. The metaphor here is that the RSS reader is like a magnet that draws information together to create a customized experience for you. First, let’s see how you would use it as an end use – let’s look at some RSS feeds with a reader. Go to http://bloglines.com. holly@nten.org gobears. View and add feeds. You can also publish your own RSS feed on your site or blog, and now your stakeholders can add your feeds to their readers! Demo nten.org/events. You can do this on web sites – most content management systems have a feature for this now, but it varies from application to application. Finally – the last thing you can do is re-publish RSS feeds on your site: http://community.telecentre.org/ Telecentre.org is a venture of Canada's International Development Agency that is also receiving support from Microsoft and the Swiss government. Telecentres are community technology centres -- in many developing nations or in rural areas, this is often the only way people have Internet access, and may also be how they get access to phone service, too -- and training in how to use all these technologies. Local telecentres are supported by various regional networks around the world -- like CTCNet in the USA. But until now there's been no formal way for a network of telecentres in Africa to share resources with a network of telecentres in Latin America. Telecentre.org aims to change that by providing lots of training and networking opportunities -- and an online network to support learning and exchange among telecentre networks. Any telecentre network in the world can create its own web site as part of the telecentre network. And any telecentre training event can create a web site, too. All these individual web sites are tied together via RSS and tags. So for example, when telecentre.org conducted a major gathering of telecentre people at the World Summit on the Information Society, they set up a separate site at wsis.telecentre.org. The main telecentre site then subscribed to the RSS feed from the WSIS site, and republished selected content onto the main site. This site was tagged "WSIS" so it would be easy to organize and find on the main site, too. http://www.stateline.org/live/
  • 75.3 million people are using RSS readers. “Using” is probably loosely defined as “have used” here. I suspect that the number of actual users is actually lower, but it’s still significant and it’s growing.
  • How many of you know what a blog is? How many of you read blogs? How many of you have a blog for your organization? If needed: “ Blog” is shorthand for Weblog. When they first started popping up, they were really used as online diaries of sorts – hence the web log term. What makes a blog different from a website is part technology, part perception. Initially, blogs were different from most web site systems because they make it VERY easy to publish content to the web. You don’t need to know HTML, upload files to a server, etc. You just type and go. Clearly, more content management systems are approaching this level of ease, but blogs are still the very easiest way to publish. The other technology aspect is that blog software tools were the first to integrate a technology called RSS RSS is important because it’s a great way to promote and distribute your work. Again, lots of CMS tools integrate with RSS at this point, but this wasn’t true from the start. Blogs are also different because of perception. Just the term Web Log intimates that this is a publishing experience that is not top down and structured. It’s bottom up and confessional. There’s something very informal that’s implied. So, while many web sites are seen as the “official voice” of an organization (the pater familias if you will), blogs are the crazy aunt that let you try smoking when you were 13 (and boy did you learn a good lesson about that!).

Lose Control by Holly Ross 10-19-07 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. People who change the world need the tools to do it.
  • 2. http://flickr.com/photos/winkelmander/295639973/
    • Takeaways
    • What is social media (web 2.0?)
    • Where do I learn more?
    • Where do I begin?
  • 3. WHY Internet Tools?
    • 73% of Americans are online
    • 42% have broadband access
    • 88% of 18 to 29 year olds are online
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7. YOU!
  • 8. THEM! http://flickr.com/photos/patisfaction/33984854/
  • 9. WHICH Internet Tools?
  • 10.  
  • 11. Four questions to ask your self about your web strategy:
  • 12. Does it help you: LISTEN http://flickr.com/photos/minor9th/120180407/
  • 13. Does it start: CONVERSATIONS http://flickr.com/photos/letthemtalk/202041390/
  • 14. Does it let users: SHARE http://flickr.com/photos/minor9th/120180407/
  • 15. Do your strategies: INTEGRATE http://flickr.com/photos/conchur/423239518/
  • 16. Where to begin? http://flickr.com/photos/engelsgjerd/825755472/
  • 17. Jump in as an Individual http://flickr.com/photos/rachel-b/785104044/ 21 Days to Make a Habit
  • 18. Let’s Explore
  • 19. Tags/Social Bookmarking
    • Identify pictures, sites, files with words that make sense to you.
    • Share those resources with others
    • Keywords to describe Digital Objects
  • 20. Tags/Social Bookmarking http://ma.gnolia.com/ http://www.furl.net/
  • 21. Tags/Social Bookmarking
    • Ideas
      • Build a knowledge center for your stakeholders
      • Publish community photos from an event or experience
      • Have a photo contest
      • Create a tag for your staff to use to share sites
  • 22. Tags - Considerations
    • It’s a habit shift – incorporate it into your workflow/day
    • Share your tags - have a tag buddy
    • Try searching tags before you use Google
    • Think about whether or not you could share tags with your community
  • 23. RSS
    • Publish Your Information
    • Aggregate a Network of Information
  • 24. RSS
  • 25. RSS
  • 26. RSS
  • 27. RSS - Considerations
    • It’s a habit shift – incorporate it into your workflow/day
    • Start slow – master the reader first
    • RSS users are still a smaller audience, and are usually more tech savvy
    • Look for ways to promote and engage your community by publishing with RSS
  • 28. Blogs I can’t remember anything anymore! My volunteers are bored! Not enough people know about my program! I’m LONELY! http://flickr.com/photos/zizzy/417769736/ Knowledge Management Community Engagement Publicity/Marketing Community
  • 29. Blogs http://flickr.com/photos/zizzy/417769736/ Source: Beth Kanter, bethkanter.typepad.com
  • 30. Blogs - Community Stories
  • 31. Blogs
    • Ideas
      • Volunteer stories
      • Field Staff stories
      • Communities of Interest
      • Event Participants
      • Knowledge Management
  • 32. Blogs - Considerations
    • What is the purpose of your blog?
    • Who is the audience for your blog?
    • What is your blog’s voice?
    • Who will blog?
    • What is your launch strategy?
    • How will you promote your blog?
  • 33. Let’s Review Tags RSS Blogs Extra Credit: Social Networking Second Life Viral Video Wikis Widget Fundraising http://flickr.com/photos/ultimateslug/416170998/
  • 34. What Would You Do? Tags RSS Blogs Social Networking Extra Credit: Second Life Viral Video Wikis Widget Fundraising http://flickr.com/photos/ultimateslug/416170998/
  • 35. Thanks: bethkanter.wikispaces.com
  • 36. Contact Me
    • Website: nten.org
    • Email: [email_address]
    • Skype: ntenhross
    • On Facebook
    • On LinkedIn