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  • 1. Riverhead Police Department Training Division “ Click” to START Title: High Risk Warrant Execution PPT Version: Windows 2002/XP Created: April 20 th , 2004 by Information & Technologies Section - Version: 1.0
  • 2. Riverhead Police Department High Risk Warrant Execution 2004
  • 3. “ To fight and conqueror in all your battles is not supreme excellence, supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemies resistance without fighting.” Sun Tzu
  • 4. High Risk Warrant Execution Overview
    • Introduction
    • Differences in Entry Tactics
    • Differences in Training
    • Tactical Mindset
    • Room Clears
    • Conclusion
  • 5. Introduction
  • 6. Officer Safety During Warrant Service
    • The first consideration when serving warrants should always be Officer Safety!
  • 7. Training Objectives
    • This block of instruction emphasizes individual officer basic entry and safety techniques.
    • Understanding entry breaching techniques and their importance to the success of the operation.
    • Familiarization with diversionary techniques and devices .
    • Understanding and executing basic movement techniques and officer safety concerns while entering and moving through unknown locations.
    • The techniques necessary to enhance the officer's ability to ascend and descend various types of stairways.
  • 8. Difference in Entry Tactics
    • Regarding the Riverhead Police Department - the Entry Tactics utilized in a High Risk Warrant Execution are different from those utilized during a Barricaded Subject, Hostage Rescue, or Active Shooter situation.
  • 9. Where did modern entry tactics originate from?
    • Israeli Military Hostage Rescue Operations during 1970s.
  • 10. What is the difference between Military Entry and a Law Enforcement Entry?
    • Law Enforcement has to make more DECISIONS!
    • The Military basically Frags and Sprays.
    • Law Enforcement Breaches, Bangs, Rushes, and is constantly making decisions.
  • 11. Remember!
    • Hall Boss System with Shield / Cover and Dynamic Room Entries are for
    • ACTIVE SHOOTER, BARRICADED SUBJECT, and HOSTAGE RESCUE
    • Modified Hall Boss System with solo Shield and Modified Room Entries are for
    • HIGH RISK WARRANT EXECUTION
  • 12. Keep in Mind!
    • A High Risk Warrant could transition into a Barricaded Subject very quickly. This would immediately dictate a change in the type of entry tactic used.
  • 13. Differences in Training vs. Reality
    • Training Reality
    • Errors: Do Overs Consequences
    • Liability: Say Sorry Financial / Jail
    • Risk: Safe Environment Injury / Death
    • Stress: Low Stress High Stress / Melt Down
  • 14. Stress Affects Performance and Decision Making
    • As stress goes up the ability to make good decision goes down.
    • Tunnel Vision.
    • Auditory Exclusion.
    • Sensory Overload
    • Default to your level of Training.
  • 15. Who shoots 100% at the range?
    • 100% Firearms qualifications (60 Rounds).
    • 9-28% Hit percentage on the street.
    • 20% C.I.R.T. score on mobile shooting (1 out of 5 rounds makes contact).
    • 87% of all handgun wounds are initially survivable.
    • 3% Your chances of stopping threat with one round (Eradicating the threat).
  • 16. What does this mean?
    • The perpetrator can shoot back!
  • 17. The Tactical Mindset
    • Boyd’s Loop (O.O.D.A.).
    • Hick’s Law.
    • Levels of awareness.
    • Muzzle discipline.
    • Proper use of cover.
    • M&M principle.
  • 18. Boyd’s Loop
    • Colonel John Boyd U.S. Air Force.
    • The cycle your mind must follow in order to make proper decisions.
    • Observe
    • Orient
    • Decide
    • Act
  • 19. O.O.D.A. Loop OBSERVE ORIENT DECIDE ACT
  • 20. Hick’s Law
    • W. E. Hick
    • Conducts study on performance phenomena in 1952.
    • “ The time it takes to make a decision is roughly proportional to the log of the number of alternatives” .
    • The more decisions you have to make, the more time it will take.
  • 21. What is the most powerful weapon you possess?
    • “ The brain is the primary weapon, all else is supplemental.”
    • John Stienbeck
  • 22. Levels of Awareness
    • Colonel Jeff Cooper U.S.M.C.
    • A color coded chart to show a persons level of readiness.
    • A tactical team should all be at the same appropriate level during an operation.
  • 23. COMPLACENT GENERALLY ALERT ALERT to X READY for ACTION CHAOS Levels of Awareness
  • 24. Condition White
    • A state of complacency.
    • In a fog or a daze.
    • Not aware of what is going on around you.
  • 25. Condition Yellow
    • Generally Alert.
    • Aware of what is going on around you.
    • Where your head should be while working.
  • 26. Condition Orange
    • Alert to X.
    • Something catches your attention or seems out of the ordinary.
    • When the hair stands up on the back of your neck.
    • When something like this happens check it out, don’t bypass it, trust your senses.
  • 27. Condition Red
    • Ready for Action.
    • Completely focused on what you are doing.
    • Where your head should be during a search warrant.
  • 28. Condition Black
    • Chaos.
    • The situation is controlling you, you are not in control of the situation.
    • Sensory overload.
  • 29. Ballistic Equation
    • 9mm Round 1,240 FPS
    • YFA 22 FPS
    • You cannot out run a bullet!
  • 30.
    • As you clear rooms during a High Risk Warrant your brain can only process the raw data it is receiving at a certain rate depending upon your ability and given parameters. If you are having difficulty interpreting this data, then you are moving too fast. Slow Down!
    Slow is Fast
  • 31.
    • The team must stay and work together. You can only move as fast as the slowest guy on the team. Remember Slow is Fast!
    Speed with Control
  • 32.
    • YES!
    Are there always weapons at every High Risk Warrant? Police are definitely bringing them.
  • 33.
    • 50% of all injuries to Tactical Team Members during high risk room entries are caused by their own Tactical Team Members.
    • You must be aware of where your muzzle is pointed at all times.
    • You must keep your finger off the trigger unless you are going to fire the weapon.
    Muzzle Discipline
  • 34.
    • Four Weapons Positions
    • Shoot (Weapon out and ready)
    • Scan (Center axis position)
    • Security (Weapon pointed to ground)
    • Safe (Holstered)
    Remember the Four S s
  • 35.
    • When you have or perceive a threat capable of causing serious physical injury or death and no one else is between you and that threat.
    When do you take your firearm out of the holster?
  • 36.
    • At the threat or the perceived threat area.
    • Eyes, Muzzle, Threat
    • Otherwise you should have your weapon in Security Position or Safe Position (Holstered).
    Where should you point your firearm?
  • 37.
    • OFF THE TRIGGER!
    • An accidental discharge during a room entry can be dangerous to yourself and your team members.
    Where should your finger be?
  • 38.
    • Lubbock, Texas - July 13 th , 2001
    • Suspect Richard Robinson (Armed)
    • Team Leader Sgt. Kevin Cox is struck in the head by a round from his own sniper and killed.
    • 300 + Rounds are fired into the home by Police.
    • The Suspect is wounded and never fired a shot.
    Lubbock P.D. Swat Team
  • 39.  
  • 40.
    • Cover is relative to the degree of the threat.
    • It must offer a reasonable expectation of protection.
    • As it relates to the firearm it must have ballistic integrity, in that, it will defeat or deflect a round.
    Definition of Cover
  • 41.
    • Engine block of a vehicle
    • Dumpster
    • Tree
    • Brick Building
    • Steel Mailbox
    • Ballistic Shield (Bunker)
    Good Examples of Cover
  • 42.
    • Fire Hydrant
    • Sheetrock Wall
    • Refrigerator
    • Curb
    • Newspaper
    • Car Doors
    • Furniture
    Not So Good Examples of Cover
  • 43.
    • Slice the pie if any part of you is seen by the suspect it should be your eye and the muzzle of your weapon.
    • Shoot around cover, not over it.
    • Stay off cover, don’t get sucked into it.
    • Don’t give up your cover for a shot.
    Proper Use of Cover
  • 44. “ Slicing the Pie” All the suspect should see is your eye and the muzzle of your weapon.
  • 45.
    • Minimize your body exposure to the threat and maximize your distance from the threat.
    M&M Principal Incorrect
  • 46.
    • Minimize your body exposure to the threat and maximize your distance from the threat.
    M&M Principal Correct
  • 47.
    • Two Clears that must be completed in order to declare a room safe and secure.
    • 1. Primary Clear (5 Areas of Responsibility)
    • 2. Secondary Clear – Objects (Furniture, Closets, Cabinets, etc.)
    Room Clears
  • 48. Primary Clear 5 Areas of Responsibility
  • 49. Primary Clear All 4 Corners 1. Door Corner 2. Long Corner 3. Diagonal Corner 4. Blind Corner
  • 50. Primary Clear And the Center of the Room
  • 51.
    • Try to dominate and secure as fast as possible.
    • Start secondary clears after all primary clears are complete.
    • Closed doors can be either breached as you go or secured for breach at a later time.
    Hallways
  • 52. Clearing Rooms
  • 53. Room Clearing: Corner Fed Room 2 S Shield Starts Room Clear
  • 54. 2 #2 Covers Hallway Long S
  • 55. 2 Diagonal Corner Cleared S
  • 56. 2 Long Corner Cleared S
  • 57. 2 Door Corner Cleared S
  • 58. 2 Switch Responsibilities S
  • 59. 2 Shield Now Has Hallway Long S
  • 60. 2 #2 Clears Blind Corner S
  • 61. 2 And Completes Center Room Clear S
  • 62. Room Clearing: Center Fed Room 2 S Shield Starts Room Clear 3
  • 63. 2 #2 Covers Hallway Long S 3
  • 64. 2 Diagonal Corner Cleared S 3
  • 65. 2 S Diagonal Corner Cleared 3
  • 66. 2 S Responsibilities Switch 3
  • 67. 2 S #3 Now Covers Hallway Long 3
  • 68. 2 S Blind Corners are Cleared Simultaneously 3
  • 69. 2 S 3 And the Center Room Clear is Completed
  • 70. Bullets do not Ricochet as we Think! Stay away from walls!
  • 71. Be Careful when using Corners as Cover!
  • 72. Suspect Contact and Apprehension
    • One Officer should give clear and concise orders to the suspect.
    • Stop suspects deadly behavior.
    • Take suspect into custody.
    • Remain in a position of cover, bring the suspect to you.
  • 73. Suspect Apprehension 2 S Remain in a Position of Cover, Bring the Suspect to You. 3 Shield gives Suspect commands. #2 Covers Hallway Long. #3 Cuffs and Handles Suspect.
  • 74. Prepare for Contingencies
    • Perimeter containment.
    • Primary entry is open (No breach required).
    • Suspect surrenders as you approach the target location.
    • Suspect leaves the area in a vehicle.
    • Suspect leaves the area on foot.
  • 75. Key Factors for a Successful Operation
    • Maximum use of Cover.
    • Numeric Superiority – Show of Force.
    • Firepower Superiority.
    • Speed – Surprise – Shock Action.
    • Accuracy – the operation must not only be fast, it must also be effective.
    • Safety – Must be a formal part of planning.
  • 76. High Risk Warrant Execution has been presented to you by the Riverhead Police Department’s Critical Incident Response Team. Instructors: P.O. Bernard J. Bobinski Riverhead Police Department Training Division / C.I.R.T. 210 Howell Avenue Riverhead, New York 11901 (631) 727-4500 Ext. 348 Stay Safe! SOURCE: The Primary Source Material for this program was developed by the National Tactical Officers Association’s and the Northeast Counterdrug Training Center NTOA P.O. Box 797 Doylestown, Pennsylvania 18901 (800) 279-9127 www.NTOA.Org NCTC Building 8-65 Fort Indiantown Gap Annville, PA 17003-5002 (877) 806-6293 www.counterdrug.Org
  • 77. End of Program