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Sxsw brandsas patterns_final

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Brands were once singular. Definitive. Complete. 
Brands today exist in multiple mediums, defined by multiple voices. 
The media a brand inhabits is iterative, with no beginning, no end, and little …

Brands were once singular. Definitive. Complete. 
Brands today exist in multiple mediums, defined by multiple voices. 
The media a brand inhabits is iterative, with no beginning, no end, and little permanency. In that context, adherence to a big idea and endless repetition of centralized, definitive rules can make a brand seem unresponsive and out of step with its audience. But without repetition, how does a brand create consistency? And without consistency, what is the value of a brand?

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  • \n
  • Todays subject of conversation. Should you wish to tweet, use brandpatterns as your hashtag, we’lltry to pull in all comments and thoughts at sxsw.method.com.\n
  • So, hands up, who’s read the ‘Brand as Patterns’ piece? \nYou’ve obviously got too much time on your hands.\n(or I knew I should have called it something pithier)\n\nWhats a pattern? Repeat, predictable, but we mean unpredictable. We think it’s a way to connect unconnected things, in interaction design christopher alexander used patterns to standardize patterns. When I use the word brand patterns, I’m defining the unique relationships between artifacts, behaviors and concepts.\n\nMethod encourages it’s employees to challenge themselves, take some time out, think about the future. 10x10 is the result, a future vision, a publishing platform, a conversation between friends. I have to announce, A new piece has just been penned to line up with SXSW, Ben Fullerton our esteemed IxD director (so esteemed that he’s presenting right now and not here), has just written a follow up to patterns, called ‘Brand as a context in Interaction Design’ The details will be at the end.\n
  • In summary, for those who haven’t read it.\n
  • In shorter summary. Those who can’t be bothered to read that long slide.\nWe knew what brands were, because they had control of a one way channel of communication.But now, repetition the major tool used to manage brand consistency are making them feel unresponsive and out of step with a connected audience. But without repetition, how do we gain consistency, without consistency how do we maintain value.\n
  • But before I go in too deep. I want to take to take time to introduce our bevy of remarkable brand minds, minds that I believe, without overstating, are at the very forefront the industry.\n
  • Walter, is a scientist of sound, a composer of the memorable and an absolute legend in the industry of mnemonics. He developed the four note mnemonic for intel.\n
  • Greg is the global creative director at Hewlett Packard, and has one of the most progressive understandings of contemporary brand thinking of any client I have had the fortune to work for. \n
  • Robin is the director of design and brand strategy at the Startup business group at Microsoft. She has one of the broadest cross discipline backgrounds I know of, her experience makes me blush as if I were still at school. \n
  • and me, I’m at best a comprehensivist, at worst indecisive. But glad to be here.\n
  • I had thought this was going to be a small conversation just amongst enthusiasts,so to make the presentation project a bit more, we’ve got a structure that should keep us going.\n
  • We’re going to follow AABA, A pattern for the pattern panel. A simple musically derived device to organize our thoughts. I’ll state the theme ‘Patterns’, greg will make it clearer, smarter and more thoughtful about digital first, Robin will provide us a bridge to a contrasting thought, narrative and it’s power, finally Walter will bring us back to patterns showing us how they’ve always been used to underpin living experiences.\n\nThen we’ll do so some free improvisation with questions, we good with that?\n
  • \n
  • Simply put,\n
  • What do I mean? \n
  • At method we craft strategy and design for brands which hopefully create innovative experiences that engage people. That covers Product and Interface design like Boxee, Digital Media Design like TED, Service Design for Nokia, Brand Strategy and Identity like Basis, Boxee and Rupture and Insights across all these.\n
  • I watched Nike move from just do it, to become just doing it. In effect Fuel, is measuring ‘do’.The integration between experience and identity meant the brand does what it promises, not just promises what it does. The brand becomes a platform that continuously iterates.\n
  • I’ve always admired Uniqlo, they place the customer at the heart of the brand. Rather than targeting a consumer. They creating small unique projects that become tools for the user. Generating a collective pattern of personal expression, much like the personal expression that is achieved through clothing choice. Uniqlock alone recieved 68 million views across 209 countries.\n\nThe projects — Mix Play, Uniqlock, Grid, Jump, March, Wire, UT, UJ and more recently Color Tweet and Sport Tweet — all differ from each other as related parts to a whole.\n
  • Whilst we’re designing interface’s, we are forced to define some unique behaviors\nand these unique behaviors are beginning to define a new kind of brand experience.\n
  • Of course, it’s easy to forget that even the most iconic brands have had to keep moving to stay the same.\n
  • But...\n
  • Of course when I say Brand, I don’t just mean the identity.There’s an association between the brand and the identity that have been created through applications of rigid rules that have define formalized expressions, perfectly controlled by the corporations that pulled all of the strings. Brands are copiously controlled by the brand owner.\n
  • Brand design is about being definitiveDesign for interaction is about being Iterative.\n
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  • The brand is defined by both the user and the corporation, through this interaction, the brand has become the constantly shifting relationship between the company and its customers.\n\n\n\n
  • When I say interface, it’s easy to think web, smartphone or tablet, but the interface is everywhere, everywhere where there’s interaction, which is everywhere. Physical stores, conversations, environment.\n
  • The customer expects the brand to be as responsive and real-time as any medium\nthrough which it is accessed, while maintaining consistency no matter how it is experienced.\nThe endless repetition of centralized, fixed rules can make a brand seem unresponsive and \nout of step with its audience.\n
  • Are you still with me?\n
  • \n
  • The identity sits at the interface, and is affected by both the corporation and the customer. You create an association between the brand and the identity by relating it to the experience and the strategy, the identity is no longer limited to be a precursor to the moment of experience. It is in the behavior of experience. (think swiping pinching, tweeting etc)\n
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  • The brand story doesn’t have to be something you have to recall after purchasing a product,or upon consumption. You’re living the brand story in realtime. The distinction between product service and experience has blurred, the identity is no longer limiting the extensibility of the brand narrative. The product, the service as product, continues the engagement beyond purchase.\n
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  • We used to defining the brand at the beginning in isolation. Story about WO telling me they didn’t do much execution when I asked about digital. Digital is an age, a context, not a medium.\n
  • Advertising set a pace of messages pushed out each quarter to manage the brand.\nQuarterly business matches merchandizing, \n
  • Products or services carefully managed to coincide with need, purchase flow, product roadmap or inventory management. Applications update, OS’s evolve, our products are services.\n
  • PR managed and curated against periodical publications of news and comment, those very same periodicals have become web-based.\n
  • The pace of the web, updated weekly, daily, hourly\n
  • Purchase dynamics have changed. Now we need to design for pre, in and post purchase, because the interface has opened up the relationship. The product we’re purchasing may not even be physical, maybe its content, or access. Consumption could be entirely free from any payment.\n
  • Social media, has changed the ability of the frequency of our brands to become almost realtime.\nCustomers expect responsiveness, if you are responsive.\n
  • The feedback loop, has become perpetual. We are no longer running banks, shoe companies or beverage brands we’re managing service experiences. We need to think about the frequency of our brands, what is right for your customers, what can you sustain, where is the value.\n
  • And defining the brand at the beginning looks kinda small, even kinda stupid.\n(crystal ball, do you have one). \nIt’s clear that we have to define the brand iteratively\nit needs to be responsive, it’s an interface, \nbut we can’t loose consistency, \nbecause the power, and so value of brand is tied up in its consistency.\n
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  • I was on the London underground...\n
  • I was on the London underground\n
  • Patterns repeat, they change, they can be very agile,yet they always retain their integrity\n
  • If you haven’t read Jeff’s book, you should\n
  • Jeff proposes a theory about the Neocortex forming an Invariant representation of the world, a pattern\n
  • This Invariant representation, is how we read words not letters.\n
  • He also proposes that at the top of the neocortex in processing terms is the hippocampus. We access hippocampus when we see something that doesn’t fit\nthe invariant representation, when something needs attention. Jeff proposes that the hippocampus remembers what is novel, delight, the variation\n
  • That is why we see the orange dot first. After a while the neocortex forms a non variant representation out of this novel moment, it becomes a new pattern.\n
  • That is why we see the orange dot first. After a while the neocortex forms a non variant representation out of this novel moment, it becomes a new pattern.\n
  • So if we go back to the chart, it’s not really about what sits at the nodes,\n
  • It’s really about how identity relates to products and services at the interface, how strategy relates to identity, products/services and experience, how experience relates to identity... these are the patterns between seemingly unrelated things.\n\n
  • Now, there are some enlightened clients out there, to whom this is native thinking.\nI’d like to ask each of our panelists to take a moment to talk about their experiences in the real life definition of brands today, to see if this resonates. To see if theres a pattern.\n
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  • But don’t forget the Why! We think too much about the how and the what and great brands are good storytellers and have all the elements of digital first brands. \n\n\n
  • Think of the brands you really admire, Nike, Starbucks, Old Spice--they know their story. Once the brand has a language, it can change with the channel.\n
  • In the Madmen era, you could make it all up. It was projected reality vs truth. The user didn’t have any way to interact and you didn’t know how they would define it. \n You could make claims if you were a detergent like makes your whites whiter and with enough communication you could make it true.\n\n\n\n
  • In its simplist form, a story is a description of a series of events that conveys meaning\n
  • Let’s talk about creating a brand’s story and the patterns\n
  • There’s a difference between storytelling and story framework. Think of it as an iceberg, the top part is dynamic but the foundation needs some static elements and you need to know which is which. Then you can iterate\n
  • Howard Schultz was in a cafe in Paris and was inspired by the lifestyle and thought the idea of a 3rd place would be enjoyed by Americans\n
  • This is Robert McKee’s chart on the rhythm of a good story. All good stories need to have tension and fluctuation but need to stand for something concrete as well.\n\n
  • Apple is about humanness vs technology\n\nMachine vs Human\n\n
  • Old Spice reconciled the tension between being a player and being a good guy. Their positioning of an experienced man and the tension between adolescence and adult has helped drive the story that is Old Spice\n\n
  • When Old Spice went through it’s rebranding exercise it was being killed by Axe. Axe was all about being a player and Old Spice reconciled the tension between being a player and being a good guy. Their positioning of an experienced man and the tension of adolescence and adult has helped drive the story that is Old Spice\n\n
  • Nike reconciles the tension between triumph of human spirit vs. win at all costs\nYou have ads like JDI and initiatives like the Girl Effect combined with more in your face communications that show the competitive side like you don’t win silver, you lose gold.\n
  • When Old Spice went through it’s rebranding exercise it was being killed by Axe. Axe was all about being a player and Old Spice reconciled the tension between being a player and being a good guy. Their positioning of an experienced man and the tension of adolescence and adult has helped drive the story that is Old Spice\n\n
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  • 56 bars\n45 repeats of the same motive\n4 exact repeats\n14 similar notes with the exact rhythm\n27 exact rhythm\n\n
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  • It’s really about how identity relates to products and services at the interface, how strategy relates to identity, products/services and experience, how experience relates to identity... these are the patterns between seemingly unrelated things.\n\n
  • We have to build empathy into our brand organizations. We have to rethink the kind of people we ask to define our brands. We have to rethink when we define our brands. We have to rethink what tools we use.\n
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Transcript

  • 1. Hello,SXSW!
  • 2. Brands as Patterns
  • 3. Brands as PatternsBrands were once singular. Definitive. Complete.Brands today exist in multiple mediums, defined by multiple voices.The media a brand inhabits is iterative, with no beginning, no end, and littlepermanency. In that context, adherence to a big idea and endless repetition ofcentralized, definitive rules can make a brand seem unresponsive and out ofstep with its audience. But without repetition, how does a brand createconsistency? And without consistency, what is the value of a brand? SXSW Brands as Patterns 4
  • 4. Brands were once:SingularDefinitive&Complete
  • 5. PanelistsWe represent practitioners,thinkers, and commissionersof brand design.
  • 6. Walter WerzowaScientist, composer,and branding legendThe development of mnemonics in sonic branding has become one ofWalters strongest fortes. He developed the 4-note mnemonics for Intel,and has been providing original music and sound design for film,television, and brands for nearly 10 years.
  • 7. Greg JohnsonGlobal Creative Director,Hewlett PackardGreg has one of the most progressive minds in brand building today.His blog, Branding By Being, is insightful and articulate about Brandexperiences in the digital world. Greg has lead a series of programs that unifythe HP brand across every touchpoint, creating coherence between brand,communication, global brand advertising, product UI, and web interface.
  • 8. Robin LanahanDirector of Design & Brand Strategy,Startup Business Group, MicrosoftRobin currently works in UX design strategy and marketing for newproduct incubations at Microsoft, looking 3-5 years out. She has anextremely broad cross media background, having held leadershippositions at companies like Nike, Wieden + Kennedy and Crispin,and Porter + Bogusky. Two decades ago, she found her passion fornew products when she led a team at W+K to invent a new soda forCoca-Cola. She has since worked on bourbon, jeans, motorcycles,TV networks, mobile phones, and NFC. 
  • 9. Marc ShillumPrincipal, MethodMarc works across discipline to manage brand coherence, unitingbehaviors, words, symbols, and signifiers into brands capable ofexisting in today’s agile and iterative environment.
  • 10. Structure
  • 11. A, A, B, A.
  • 12. So why patterns?
  • 13. I like paradoxes.
  • 14. Interface is In the past few years, Ive designed mostly digital experiences.iterative That means crafting iterative, successively released, behavior-based design that is systematically built for change. The power of the interface is in its usefulness and relevance, which is reinforced through consistent iteration. The user defines my world.
  • 15. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.Phasellus tempus dui sed neque euismod eget malesuadaaugue cursus. Nulla vitae risus elit, eu sodales lorem. Cras ipsumarcu, volutpat ut egestas a, sollicitudin sit amet tortor. Morbifacilisis lorem eu libero aliquam tincidunt. Etiam in consequatpurus. Sed vulputate gravida arcu in cursus. Morbi et purusnibh. Nulla lorem urna, blandit et pharetra at, iaculis non enim.Suspendisse sed felis nibh. Fusce faucibus congue dui aegestas. Nunc nec odio vel justo mattis vestibulum non noneros. Sed fermentum augue id risus laoreet nec elementummetus fringilla. Duis pretium tincidunt tincidunt. Praesent egetporttitor dui. Duis interdum justo quis neque rutrum molestie.Nunc id odio a mauris elementum imperdiet ut vitae dui. Nullamcursus elementum erat, cursus adipiscing orci molestie non.Nullam nec elit a urna aliquet mollis nec in felis. Praesent rutrum,ligula et adipiscing eleifend, magna purus consequat mi, inimperdiet nibh risus eu ligula.
  • 16. But Im also addicted to Paul Rand, Bass, Chermayeff, and Sutnar. Im a great believer inBrands are the reductive power of brands. These are usuallydefinitive articulated as artifacts that are consistently applied and rigorously policed through definitive documentation, books, or bibles. The power of the brand is in its truth, its legibility. It’s fixed in time and is reinforced through consistent repetition. The corporation defines my world.
  • 17. I said I liked paradoxes.
  • 18. I said I liked paradoxes.However, we all know that brandstoday aren’t owned by corporations.They are shared experiences.
  • 19. A brand is arelationship Interface Interaction
  • 20. The brand is the interface.
  • 21. The This requires that a brand’s “identity” should not only be defined definitively in a book orbrand becomes bible, but also iteratively through successiveiterative. release and behaviorally through interactions. The value of a brand isnt just consistency of repetition. Brand value is also defined by its relevance and continued usefulness. It needs to be responsive.
  • 22. So...
  • 23. If the brand is the interface,its identity is temporal.
  • 24. If the brand is the interface,we have a chance to put thebrand in the interfaces we work on,rather than just on them.
  • 25. And, if the brand is the interface,It should have a theme and a variation.A frequency, it becomes a sequence.
  • 26. BRAND SXSW Brands as Patterns 34
  • 27. BRAND ADVERTISING PRODUCTS/SERVICES SXSW Brands as Patterns 35
  • 28. BRAND ADVERTISING PRODUCTS/SERVICES PR SXSW Brands as Patterns 36
  • 29. BRAND ADVERTISING PRODUCTS/SERVICES PR WEB CONTENT SXSW Brands as Patterns 37
  • 30. BRAND ADVERTISING PRODUCTS/SERVICES PR WEB CONTENT PURCHASE DYNAMIC SXSW Brands as Patterns 38
  • 31. BRAND ADVERTISING PRODUCTS/SERVICES PR WEB CONTENT PURCHASE DYNAMIC SOCIAL MEDIA SXSW Brands as Patterns 39
  • 32. BRAND ADVERTISING PRODUCTS/SERVICES PR WEB CONTENT PURCHASE DYNAMIC SOCIAL MEDIA USER RESPONSE SXSW Brands as Patterns 40
  • 33. BRAND ADVERTISING PRODUCTS/SERVICES PR WEB CONTENT PURCHASE DYNAMIC SOCIAL MEDIA USER RESPONSE SXSW Brands as Patterns 41
  • 34. BRAND ADVERTISING PRODUCTS/SERVICES PR WEB CONTENT PURCHASE DYNAMIC SOCIAL MEDIA USER RESPONSE
  • 35. Back to the paradox.Definitive and Iterative.
  • 36. Consistent and different.How do we do that?
  • 37. Patterns
  • 38. Patterns Patterns are unique in the fact that they create consistency around difference and variation.
  • 39. Patterns Patterns are unique in the fact that they create consistency around difference and variation. I believe creating a consistent brand capable of existing in today’s agile and iterative environment begins with the formulation of coherent patterns.
  • 40. We want art to be familiar yetat the same time to be unique and unexpected…Too much familiarity is retread or kitsch, too muchuniqueness is jarring and difficult to appreciate.- Jeff Hawkins, On Intelligence
  • 41. A pattern readingmachine The Neocortex
  • 42. Rseaerch icntidaes taht theoerdr of the ltteers in a wroddnsoe’t relaly mettar. Wahtrelaly mtteras is the frist andlsat leettr in the wrod. If tehyare in the rhgit palce, you canraed the wdors.
  • 43. A variation processor The Hippocampus
  • 44. It detectsdifferences inpatterns
  • 45. It detectsdifferences inpatterns
  • 46. But, it’s not just aboutwhat I believe.
  • 47. Greg JohnsonGlobal Creative Director,Hewlett Packard
  • 48. Experiences are liquid,and our brand must follow.
  • 49. Rules are rigid,so we resort to tools instead.
  • 50. Digital isn’t a medium,it’s the age we’re in.
  • 51. We must be digital first.
  • 52. What defines a digital-firstbrand?
  • 53. Digital-first brands aredesigned to be distinctive,relevant, & active.
  • 54. Digital-first brands aredesigned to be distinctive,relevant, & active.Ownable, signatureexpressions.
  • 55. Digital-first brands aredesigned to be distinctive,relevant, & active.Personal, meaningful.
  • 56. Digital-first brands aredesigned to be distinctive,relevant, & active.Delivering, doing, moving.
  • 57. Robin LanahanDirector of Design & Brand Strategy,Startup Business Group, Microsoft
  • 58. Pattern language in brandsis about the story.
  • 59. Story endures as thecontext changes.
  • 60. StoryA description of a seriesof events that conveysmeaning.
  • 61. When you strip away the surface ofall great stories, at heart they sharean identical form. As in allcategories of art, there is anunderlying structure. Form is whatmakes a painting a work of artinstead of doodling. It’s what makessomething music instead of noise.So it is with story.- Robert McKee
  • 62. Static vs.Dynamic Story Telling Story Framework
  • 63. Framework questions todevelop a story for your brand:What was the inciting incident for the creating this brand?What world does the brand live in?What is the nature of the brand’s relationship with its consumers/customers?What does the brand desire that motivates the brand beyond money? (Values)What are the sources of conflict that make the brand’s story interesting andengaging?What are we challenging?Where is there a human truth the brand can build on?
  • 64. Pulp Fiction Act 1 Act 2 Act 3 3 diner 1 crash 4 date 5 gold watch 2 bonnie 3 diner Positive Negative crash execute high friendly OD saved dead revenge Marv. Wolf help up kept suitcase near miss hold up no kill told to fall watch shoot Mar. caught Saves Mar. hold up hold up Jules getaway friendly disco friendsPlot Points: inciting incident turning point climax Plots: Vince Mission Jules Quit Butch Escape Honey Bunny Rob Vince-Mia Love
  • 65. Great brands combineopposites:Its in Apples DNA that technology alone is not enough. Its technologymarried with liberal arts, married with the humanities that yields theresults that makes our hearts sing. And nowhere is that more true inthese post PC devices.- Steve Jobs, iPad 2 Keynote, 03/02/11
  • 66. Walter WerzowaScientist, composer,and branding legend
  • 67. The act of composingmusic is similar todeveloping a brand.
  • 68. Using music to Time is an essential element to music. There is horizontal and vertical development. Ultimately, the listener interactscommunicate with the creator/composer/performer. Music is valuable as a communicative tool because it isn’t inhibited by language barriers. The message depends on the particulars of music theory and the associations we, as a global culture, have developed over time.
  • 69. Using brand to Time is an essential element to brand. There is horizontal and vertical development. Ultimately, the listener interacts with thecommunicate creator/composer/performer. Brand is valuable as a communicative tool because it isn’t inhibited by language barriers. The message depends on the particulars of the brand and the associations we, as a global culture, have developed over time.
  • 70. Repeat this pattern 45times for one minute.
  • 71. Repeat this pattern 45times for one minute.Repetitive and boring.
  • 72. 56 bars45 repeats of the same motive4 exact repeats14 similar notes with the exact rhythm27 exact rhythm
  • 73. Successful music is builtthrough the right combinationof what is expected andsomething new.
  • 74. Successful brands are builtthrough the right combinationof what is expected andsomething new.
  • 75. We lose audiences with eitherthe lack of expected (chaos)or variation (repetition).
  • 76. Apply Beethoven’s methodologyto the Intel 4 mnemonic. INTEL 1 walter werzowa/musikvergnuegen 1 2 Grand Piano Grand Piano
  • 77. Patterns in Patterns are driving force in our brains. Thoughts and memories are created through electrical impulses. Thisthe brain process has variance: a computer will give the same answer 10 times in a row, but a human’s answer will vary each time. In processing, our brain might come up with many different answers, but the brain determines which answer has the highest probability to be true. This model stands for businesses and forward-thinking, innovation, and creativity. It is a flexible system.
  • 78. The power Though it is possible to trace this memorable four-note motive through most of the measures of the movement,of motif esteemed English musicologist, Sir Donald Tovey pointed out that the power of the music is not contained in this fragment, but rather in the “long sentences” that Beethoven built from it.
  • 79. Successful branding:the reward is dopamine.
  • 80. The reward Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that helps control the brain’s reward and pleasure centers.is dopamine Neuroscientific studies have shown that dopamine is released not at the emotional peak of a composition, but approximately 12 seconds beforehand.
  • 81. Ourchallenge to you
  • 82. We believe that the type of designerwe need to steward brands in thefuture should be:
  • 83. Experience Able to understand the needs of all of the constituents of the brand. They are as conversant with user behavior anddesigners ethnography, as they are with organizational behavior, operations, and corporate communication.
  • 84. Time-based Able to create iterative, relevant brand elements that create engagement across all the necessary interfaces.thinkers Both physical and digital.
  • 85. Systematic As adept at organizing a complex system that provides utility as they are in telling simple narrative that createsand narrative emotion.thinkers
  • 86. Comprehensivists Don’t make everyone an expert. People who can formulate patterns between seemingly unconnected things. They are empathetic, collaborative thinker-makers with strong craft skills and interests in many disciplines.
  • 87. And Comprehend the ABCof brand patterns.ArtifactsAny consistent expression of the brand - a logo, a name, a tagline, a product, a sound,that is uniquely recognizable and intentionally managed.BehaviorsA discrete set of states, traits, actions or responses that demonstrate and personify thebrand through the relationship with its employees, customer or audience.ConceptsThe plural thoughts and visions that strategically bind an organization to its investors,employees or customers.
  • 88. Learn more:@threepress @method_inc#patterns10x10.method.comBrands as Patterns10x10.method.com/brands-as-patternsBrand as Context in Interaction Design10x10.method.com/brand-as-context-in-interaction-design
  • 89. Thank you!