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Celebrity Chefs Paginas Julio Fernandez
 

Celebrity Chefs Paginas Julio Fernandez

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El Chef paraguayo Julio Fernández

El Chef paraguayo Julio Fernández

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    Celebrity Chefs Paginas Julio Fernandez Celebrity Chefs Paginas Julio Fernandez Document Transcript

    • Laura Gosalbo & Henri-Pierre Millescamps celebrity chefs Food entertainment history From the first great chefs to television FRANKFURT BOOK FAIR LIMITED EDITION FOR PROFESSIONALS ONLY
    • CONTENTS 12 FOREWORD BY EDOUARD COINTREAU EDOUARD NIGNON PIERRE LACAM 14 INTRODUCTION BY THE AUTHORS AUGUSTE ESCOFFIER PROSPER MONTAGNÉ PIERRE BLOT 19 WHY WE LIKE TV COOKERY SHOWS CHARLES RANHOFER 23 HOW TO BECOME A TOP CHEF 29 WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE A CELEBRITY CHEF? 117 ORIGINS OF SHOW COOKING 35 THE PERFECT CELEBRITY CHEF 39 TV CHEFS AT HOME 123 THE RISE OF FOOD ON TV TV AND COOKING SHOWS: AN OVERVIEW 45 COOKING IS WHAT MADE THE MAN 124 TV CHEFS: WORLDWIDE CELEBRITIES 61 FAMOUS CHEFS THROUGHOUT HISTORY MOIRA MEIGHT X. MARCEL BOULESTIN GUILLAUME TIREL, TAILLEVENT MAITRE CHIQUART 131 POST-WAR CHEFS IN BRITAIN JOHANN BOCKENHEIM PHILIP HARBEN MEISTER EBERHARDS MARGUERITE PATTERN MAESTRO MARTINO FANNY CRADDOCK BARTOLOMEO DE SACCHI GRAHAM KERR ROBERT DE NOLA LESLIE HOARE ANTONIO CAMURIA DELIA SMITH CRISTOFORO DA MESSISBUGO KEITH FLOYD LEONARDO DA VINCI THE NEW GENERATION BARTOLOMEO SCAPPI NIGELLA LAWSON MARX RUMPOLT JAMIE OLIVER LANCELOT DE CASTEAU FRANÇOIS MASSIALOT 179 CHEFS IN THE USA PATRICK LAMB JAMES BEARD VINCENT DE LA CHAPELLE DIONE LUCAS FRANÇOIS PIERRE DE LA VARENNE FLORENCE HANFORD FRANÇOIS VATEL JULIA CHILD FRANCISCO MARTINEZ MONTIÑO JACQUES PEPÍN ANTONIO CATALÁN WOLFGANG JOHANN PUCK ANTONIN CARÈME EMERIL JOHN LAGASSE ALEXIS SOYER JULES GOUFFÉ 206 FRANCE URBAIN DUBOIS ADOLPHE DUGLÉRÉ 213 SPAIN 10 CELEBRITY CHEFS
    • 216 GERMANY YVAN CADIOU (FRANCE) CHAKALL (PORTUGAL) 219 CHINA CHRISTINE CUSHING (CANADA) 226 JAPAN FLORA DE ECHANDI (COSTA RICA) DONATO DE SANTIS (ARGENTINA) 228 ARAB COUNTRIES JULIO FERNÁNDEZ (PARAGUAY) JIGYASA GIRI & PRATIBHA JAIN-PRITYA (INDIA) 231 SOME SHOWS THAT CHANGED THE RULES ANNABEL LANGBEIN (NEW ZEALAND) TWO FAT LADIES NARDA LEPES (ARGENTINA) THE NAKED CHEF LEA LINSTER (LUXEMBOURG) IRON CHEF ANDRES MADRIGAL (SPAIN) FAVOURITE MOMENTS: THE SWEDISH MUPPET CHEF LAUREL-ANN MORLEY (BARBADOS) MICHEL OLIVER (FRANCE) 236 COMPETITIVE COOKING SHOWS COCO PACHECO (CHILE) CHEF RAMZI (LEBANON) 239 FOOD REALITY SHOWS CLAUDIA RODEN (UK) 242 FOOD & THE INTERNET ART SMITH (USA) 243 FOOD GAMES SAHRAP SOYSAL (TURKEY) 243 WINE TV MARLENA SPIELER (USA) 246 21st-CENTURY CHEFS ANDREAS VIESTAD (NORWAY) VOLUNDUR VOLUNDARSON (ICELAND) CHEF WAN (MALAYSIA) 251 FOOD & TV TODAY IN FIVE INTERVIEWS FOOD CHANEL DIRECTOR: MANDI CIRZA (SPAIN) 337 ABOUT THE CHEFS: BIOGRAPHIES AND TV PRESENTER: BASS WESTERWEEL (THE NETHERLANDS) INTERVIEWS SOCIOLOGIST: JEROEN BOSCHNA (THE NETHERLANDS) FOOD CRITIC: RASHMI UDAY SINGH (INDIA) 407 FOOD TV: COUNTRIES, TV PROGRAMMES TV PRODUCER: EDOUARD COINTREAU (FRANCE) AND CELEBRITY CHEFS 271 CHEFS AND RECIPES 441 GLOSSARY MONIKA AHLBERG (SWEDEN) VEFA ALEXIADOU (GREECE) 450 INDEX OF RECIPES JOSÉ ANDRÉS (SPAIN) CUQUITA ARIAS DE CALVO (PANAMA) 454 BIBLIOGRAPHY MRIDULA BALKEJAR (UK) YANN BARRAUD (FRANCE) RACHAEL BERMINGHAM & KIM McCOSKER (AUSTRALIA) JULIE BIUSO (NEW ZEALAND) CHRISTIAN BRAVO (PERU) CELEBRITY CHEFS 11
    • FOREWORD BY EDOUARD COINTREAU Every country around the world now has its own celebrity chef(s). A celebrity chef today usually does not have a restaurant, but a television show. Very few celebrity chefs are known beyond their national boundaries, but they are usually huge stars in their own country. The public has a very close bond with its celebrity chef. He or she becomes the family figure who transmits food culture. This role was once played by the mother or grand -mother in nearly all cul- tures, but has disappeared with the modern way of living. So the celebrity chef has become part of the family, and has a major role in society, impacting on behaviour, health and social life. Television is the most effective medium for conveying emotion. The celebrity chef builds his or her success on the ability to entertain, using food as a tool to satisfy the basic needs and emotions of the public. The Romans wanted bread and circuses, panem et circen- ses. Today, on television, bread is the circus. The celebrity chef is an entertainer with a following which makes him a star, but his role with food places him at the centre of the family. Thus, the one quality that unites celebrity chefs around the world is that the public wants them to be part of their family. Clearly they have to be “normal” and never appear arrogant, they must seem friendly and relaxed, with powerful energy and obvious mastery of the culinary arts. There are a few black sheep – foul mouthed and with a bad attitude – as in every family, but even they may be accepted if their behaviour is combined with humour and if it finds an echo in the same anti-social traits found in the general public. Nearly all celebrity chefs stop running restaurants, as that is such a difficult business. Most of their income is derived from their tele- vision appearances, cookbooks, sponsorships, product endorse- 12 CELEBRITY CHEFS
    • ments and events, rather than directly from their television broad- casts. Television is their marketing tool, which they need in order to promote their real business in the consumer market. Cookbooks may possibly be the major business for celebrity chefs. Most of them will make more money from selling books than from television. But they need the television in order to sell the books. At the end of the twentieth century a cookbook linked to a television programme might sell at least ten times more than if it had been marketed without the benefit of television. Today, the market is very competitive, and the cookbook linked to a television show usually stops selling the moment the show is off the air. Television has been the engine behind the growth of the cookbook market worldwide, which has multiplied fourfold in the last twenty years. This book is extremely useful because it shows how star chefs in the past were real cooks, owning or running restaurants or working for wealthy patrons with important households. Today, celebrity chefs run millions of kitchens over which they preside through television entertainment, and have no time for a restaurant. The main focus of the book is to show that celebrity chefs are actually remarkable human beings who can blend into most families easily, happily and peacefully. Their drive and energy fuel their food. In many instances, they have become role models for the young and inspire positive behaviour. In the future, they may be a key to improving a sustainable, healthy world. We all need the celebrity chefs. Edouard Cointreau Gourmand World Cookbook Awards CELEBRITY CHEFS 13
    • long as we treat food as mere fuel and convenience, we shall be part of the instant food movement but once we begin to realise that food nourishes and makes us who we are, in addition to exciting us, then we’ll move more towards the opposite end of the spectrum”. Chef Wan insists on the health aspect: “People are getting more and more concerned about food and about what they eat. Everybo- dy loves eating but, at the same time, we are more worried about health and living well. Some of us never learned to cook, but now we think it is basic, it is important. Many shows on TV project that: our need to cook for healthy lifestyle”. The problem, as Chef Völundur Völundarson sees it, is that “We need time to devote to cooking and, if people take a lot of pleasure in preparing food, but they have a busy life, by watching a few te- levision programmes, they will discover that making a simple meal can be fun and easy”. Coco Pacheco explains that good cooking is relaxing, through creating the food and eating it. “Our world is running fast, but being in a hurry does not bring us happiness. Eating calmly, eating good food, really well-prepared dishes containing natural, high- quality ingredients produces a high level of satisfaction, higher still when we share them with friends or relatives.” According to Andres Madrigal: “Our society has changed not only the way we eat but the meaning of cooking too. We have acquired bad habits with the new lifestyle but we want to know more about everything, including food, and we are bringing back some recipes, going back to our roots, and opening up a new way of en- joying and a culture that had long been forgotten.” Being a home chef is fashionable nowadays, something that adds prestige to our c.v. and a new extension to our social life. As Flora de Echandi puts it, “Is there a better way to welcome our guests than with a homemade lunch or dinner?” She is right, fast food is monotonous, boring, but usually it is all that we have time to eat in the midst of our busy daily lives, even though we may be longing to be back home, enjoying good home-made food. Chef Ramzi and Chef Völundur Völundarson The twenty-first century brings us back to the comfort and intimacy at Gourmand/LBF Cookbook Corner, London Book Fair 2008. of home and as Cuquita Arias, “Frequently we try to find nice tra- ditions and memories to share with people we consider special and to whom we offer the privilege of sharing our table”. So, for the beginner, it’s a good idea to show how to make some easy, basic recipes, a few ideas for improving our way of eating. This is what Julio Fernandez defines as “educational entertain- 20 CELEBRITY CHEFS
    • ment”, demonstrating healthy but basic dishes, using ingredients that are easy find and making food that does not require long preparation. We soon come to realise that cookery is a matter of “practice makes perfect”, until we no longer fear pots, pans, and stoves; “When one has learnt the basics well, then one can improvise, innovate, and create magic in the kitchen“(Pedatha & Pratihba). For Yvan Cadiou there are some economic reasons as well: “In the 1980’s there was a lot of money around: the stock market, the internet business, there was easy money for a lot of people. Going out for food was a new trend and for twenty years, from 1980 to 2000, people lost the gift of passing on the knowledge of cooking at home. Now in 2008, people have realised that it is a good thing to cook at home, first of all because you know what you are eating, you know the quality. Secondly it brings everyone together, and thir- dly, with the world economic crisis the cost of food has increased a lot, and so people have realised that it is cheaper to cook at home. So, suddenly, everybody wants to learn, and when there is no link, no connection between parents and children as there used to be in the past, you have to learn from chefs, from cookbooks, and from television”. Michel Oliver adds: “We are living into the civilization of the leisure activities but we do not have (crisis obliges) the means to take ad- vantage of it. The most gratifying and the cheapest leisure is cooking. Women consider cooking as a daily duty; it is the man who seized this hobby. It is like acting as a magician to transform the ingredients and after receiving the congratulations of his guests. Today celebrity chefs are the TV stars and It’s easy to become identified to them.” If we are really busy, we can cook at the weekend something have seen or read during the week. As Andreas Viestad explains it: “the- re are those of us who live not only of food but for food. But people with a more – what shall I say – normal relationship to food have a tendency to combine an interest in food with precooked dishes and fast food. On weekdays they eat whatever is simple and quick; at the weekend, they either eat out or do their own cooking. In many ways, it is everyday food that suffers”. Andreas Viestad. For Donato de Santis it is a question of marketing, “the huge TV companies are always hungry for new product, new designers, new super-models and rock stars…now it is cooks who have become the latest fashion”. Whatever the situation, we must not forget that eating is a social act, which is why anything related with food will always be a success. CELEBRITY CHEFS 21
    • te constantly, easy things, simple things, it took me ten years to get rid of my professional attitude and technique and become a normal person because I am closer to people that way. The more I cook for my friends at home or for my family, the closer I am to reality.” CHAKALL “Yes, I cook quite often.” CHRISTINE CUSHING “I cook at home almost every day. When I was shooting a live daily show, I would cook on weekends because I would get home very late during the week.” FLORA DE ECHANDI “At home, I prepare and taste new recipes, the ones that we are going to record weekly for television programmes.” DONATO DE SANTIS “I cook quite often, sharing knifes and chopping-boards with my wife and my daughters.” JULIO FERNANDEZ “I live alone and I don’t like to cook for myself, so usually I go out but, I cook for special occasions.” JIGYASA GIRI & PRATIBHA JAIN-PRITYA “Both of us love to cook for our families and friends.” ANNABEL LANGHBEIN “Yes, always, I am obsessed. It’s like a physical need I have to cook. Even when I go on holiday I cook. We went on a family holiday up to the Sofitel in Hua Hin and after a day or two sitting round the pool I just had to find the kitchens, and then spent the rest of the week in there helping out and learning how to cook some amazing Thai food. That is my idea of bliss.” NARDA LEPES “I do cook, but less than I would like to. I live in a Chinese neighborhood, so that I have a lot of fresh produce nearby. Grilled fish, soups, a lot of soups, tortillas, vegetable croquettes, pastas…some cooked dishes.” LEA LINSTER “Well, everything in my life has been about since I was born. For me, it is entertainment, and I don’t want to loose this word.” Chef Julio Fernández with Oky, his friend and co-host ANDRES MADRIGAL in their program Sabores y Algo Más, Red Guaraní, Paraguay. “Unfortunately I have no time to cook at home but when I have the chan- ce to cook for my family and friends, I really have a great time.” LAURELANN MORLEY “I cook, I cook everything, we do everything. Our restaurant is in our home, we live upstairs, we even do lunch, we sit on the gallery, loo- 40 CELEBRITY CHEFS
    • JULIO FERNÁNDEZ (PARAGUAY) “La gastronomía es la identidad cultural de la naciones, es algo que las representa y muy bien, del mismo modo que lo hace la música u otro arte.” Sopa paraguaya Sopa típica de la cocina paraguaya Serves 4 300 CELEBRITY CHEFS
    • Ingredientes: Preparación: 1.500 g de harina de La cebolla se pica y sofrita con el aceite maíz precocida. sin que la cebolla tome color y se deja 300 g de queso paraguay enfriar. Aparte se baten los huevos con el (es un queso casero fresco) queso previamente desmenuzado. 6 huevos. En un bol se coloca la harina de maíz y 200 ml de leche. se mezcla muy bien con la cebolla pre- 200 ml de aceite de maíz parada anteriormente, luego se incorpo- 5 g de sal fina. ra el batido de queso y los huevos, se 250 g de cebolla picada. agrega la sal. Por último y según la ne- cesidad, la leche. Se coloca en un pirex, se cocina al horno por un tiempo de 30 minutos y a una temperatura de 170ºC. Queda como una torta de maíz y se sir- ve fría o caliente. Nota: el pirex se enmanteca previamente. Antiguamente se usaba la hoja de bana- na como base antiadherente. Ingredientes: 1 gallina casera. 100 ml de aceite de maíz. vori-vori de gallina 2 dientes de ajos. 250 g de cebolla picada o rallada. 100 g de zanahoria en brunoise. 150 g de tomate picadito. 100 g pimiento verde (locote verde) picado. 1 rama de orégano Para el vori: preferentemente fresco. 150 g de harina de maíz. sal fina a gusto. 100 g de queso paraguay. 2 hojas de laurel. 2000 ml de agua. Preparación: Cortar en 8 presas la gallina y dorar en aceite de maíz y se reserva aparte. En el mismo fondo se sofríen todas la verduras y la hoja de laurel. Luego se agrega el agua, la sal, algo de pimienta negra y se deja cocinar. Una vez que empiece el hervor incorporar las presas de gallina previamente doradas. En un bol colocar la harina de maíz con queso desmenuzado y hu- medecer con un poco del caldo de gallina, hasta que resulte una masa manejable (como para albóndigas). Amasar durante algunos minutos, armar un bolitas pequeñas con la masa e incorporar den- tro del caldo. Dejar cocinar durante 10 minutos, agregar el orégano fresco y servir bien caliente. CELEBRITY CHEFS 301