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The Good Behaviour Game - ADEPIS seminar
 

The Good Behaviour Game - ADEPIS seminar

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The Good Behaviour Game is an early classroom management intervention programme.

The Good Behaviour Game is an early classroom management intervention programme.

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    The Good Behaviour Game - ADEPIS seminar The Good Behaviour Game - ADEPIS seminar Presentation Transcript

    • The Good Behaviour Game: A Classroom Behaviour Management Strategy Presented by Chrissie Spring Teaching & Learning Consultant - Behaviour Piloted by Oxford Brookes University and Oxfordshire County Council
    • Goals of the Good Behaviour Game  To socialise children into the role of being a pupil and to reduce disruptive and aggressive behaviours in the classroom “The Headteacher suspended me – School is the only place in the world where you can get time off for bad behaviour.” CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 2
    • The History of the Good Behaviour Game  GBG was originally developed by Barrish, Saunders, & Wolfe at the University of Kansas with the first report in 1969 CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 3 3
    • Impact of Poorly Managed Classrooms On pupils:  Aggressive, disruptive behaviour as early as Year 2 is a major risk factor for academic failure, later school drop-out, delinquency, drug abuse, depression, and other problem outcomes.  Children with behaviour problems in poorly managed Year 2 classrooms were up to 20 times more likely to exhibit severe aggressive problems in late primary / early secondary years compared to similar children in well managed Year 2 classrooms. How does this impacts on teachers?  The number one reason for teacher burn-out is the inability to manage the classroom. CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 4
    • LONG TERM BENEFITS OF THE GOOD BEHAVIOUR GAME Selected Outcomes at Young Adulthood (age 19-21) GBG classrooms Standard Program classrooms Risk Reduction Use of School-Based Services for Problems with Behaviour, Emotions, or Drugs or Alcohol  Males highly aggressive, disruptive in Year 2 17% 33% 48% Lifetime Illicit Drug Abuse/Dependence Disorder  All Males  Males highly aggressive, disruptive in Year 2 19% 29% 38% 83% 50% 65% Lifetime Alcohol Abuse/Dependence Disorder  All males and females 13% 20% 35% Smoking 10 or more cigarettes a day regularly  All males  Males highly aggressive, disruptive in Year 2 7% 0% 17% 40% 59% 100% Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD)  All males and females  Males highly aggressive, disruptive in Year 2 17% 41% 25% 86% 32% 52% Drug and Alcohol Dependence (2008), 95S, Kellam et al.; Poduska et al.; Petras at al.; Wilcox et al.; and Brown et al. CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 5
    • Additional Benefits of the GBG  Changes in teacher practices  Differentiation of tasks for pupils  Awareness of pupil needs and growth in terms of behaviour and learning CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 6
    • Lessons Learned  Year 2 classrooms particularly important to later academic, mental, and behavioural health.  A relatively simple method of classroom behaviour management that can have a dramatic long-term impact if done with fidelity.  Without a system to mentor, model, and monitor teacher practices over time, GBG practices are not sustained. A good knowledge of teaching and learning and pedagogical practice as well as behaviour management is essential without this mentoring will not be effective. CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 7 7
    • Training and Support  Teachers  Initial GBG Training: Group-based  Booster Sessions: group-based if required  Supported by trained coach with QTS or similar professional skills: In-classroom (observing, modeling, mentoring)  Professional development based on teacher practices/fidelity checklists 8 CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 8
    • GBG Core Elements  Classroom Rules  Team Membership  Monitoring of Behaviour  Positive Reinforcement CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 9
    • Voice Levels: Displayed on a poster and referred to by the teacher in and out of the Game 0 - Voices Off 1 - WHISPER VOICE (Speak in a whisper voice to your neighbour) 2 – INSIDE VOICE (Speak in a quiet voice to people who are close to you) 3 – OUTSIDE VOICE (A voice you would only use outside) CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 10
    • Team Membership  Baseline for each pupil is done using an agreed form of assessment.  Classes are divided into heterogeneous teams (4-7, depending on class size), balanced for learning, behaviour, and gender. CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 11
    • Implementation Materials Team Membership Blank Space for Marks ARDVARKS Team 1: Joan, Tyrone, Carlos, Anna, Karen, Miguel Team 2: Natalie, Matt, Gregg, Brian, Kim, Maria Team 3: Tarsha, Jacob, Maria, Darin, Juan, Faye Team 4: Dawn, Christy, Donna, Sean, Khalil CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775  Implementation Manual for Teachers  Class Rules Poster, Desk Copy of Class Rules  GBG Team Membership chart  If necessary, change team membership to ensure that they are balanced. 12 12
    • Team Checks With a Set Script  Team Aardvark gets a MARK because Tyrone broke Rule # 1 We will work quietly.  I like the way some / the rest of Team Aardvark and everyone else in the class are working quietly. CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 13
    • How is the GBG played ?  The GBG is played for brief intervals at first (5-10 minutes, three times a week)  The duration and frequency are gradually lengthened as children gain practice in controlling their behaviours.  Rewards become more intangible as the year progresses. CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 14 14
    • Strict Procedures Fidelity Checklists Starting the Game Announcing that the GBG is about to start Introducing Tasks Reviewing directions for independent work Reinforcing Class Rules Reviewing the four class rules Playing the Game Setting the timer; monitoring behaviour; following the check, comment, praise procedure Ending the Game Stopping the GBG when the timer rings; announcing its end Announcing Winning Teams Identifying/announcing teams earning 4 or fewer marks Providing Rewards Distributing tangible rewards or privilege/activity reward tokens Recording Game Results Recording points earned by teams on the weekly scoreboard onto the GBG Score Record and stamping pupil booklets CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 15
    • Selecting Rewards and Incentives  At the end of the Game, teams with four or fewer marks earn rewards.  Each team that wins at least one game during the week also earns a weekly reward. CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 16
    • Record Keeping and the mysterious ‘PROBE’  A probe is a way to see if the pupils’ behaviour has improved outside of the game  2-3 times a week for 10-15 minutes  Children must be in their GBG teams BUT are not playing the game – the rules can still apply  It is a chance for teachers to see how and if behaviour has generalised – problem solve as needed. CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 17
    • GBG into the day to day practice  Referencing rules at every opportunity  Let the children know what the voice level is that they are required to work with.  Modelling expectations with pupils  Consistent routines CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775  Praising pupils consistently for following rules  Making expectations clear  Least to most intrusive interventions.  Monitoring consistently throughout the day 18
    • Oxfordshire Coaching  Three cycles a year  Regular visits by the coach  Fidelity checklists  Probes  Record keeping  Teacher’s development plan developing management, teaching and learning by trained GBG coaches with Qualified Teacher Status CONTACT •Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Jack Straws Lane, Marston • Oxford OX3 0FL • Phone +44 (0)1865 482600 • Fax +44 (0) 01865 482775 19