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  • 1. Diane Fromm PMI Educational Foundation: Empowering the Future of Project Management October 19, 2006 – 10:00 AM [email_address]
  • 2. The PMI Educational Foundation
    • The PMI Educational Foundation is an integral, supporting organization of the Project Management Institute with its own, non-salaried Board of Directors.
    • The PMI Educational Foundation (PMIEF) serves individuals with a common goal – promoting economic, educational, cultural and social advancement through project management life skills.
  • 3. Vision and Mission
    • Vision: To champion project management knowledge and skills for educational and social good.
    • Mission: Promote project management principles globally to communities including students, non-profit organizations and society at large.
  • 4. Current Programs
    • Careers in Project Management
    • Project Management Skills for Life
    • Project Management Scholarships
  • 5. Careers in Project Management
    • Developed for students to introduce them to career options in project management.
    • A tool that PMI components can use to establish partnerships with schools to introduce, expand, and further project management as a career.
    • Recently translated into Spanish to allow for wider distribution.
  • 6. Project Management Skills for Life
    • The Educational Foundation’s newest initiative, PM Skills for Life , is now available.
    • Created to help civic groups apply the principles of project management to achieve their own project objectives.
    • The program was developed by PMI’s Nashville Chapter to be implemented by PMP mentors and PMI Components as part of their outreach programs.
  • 7. Project Management Scholarships
    • The PMI Educational Foundation has established a tuition scholarship program to assist qualified students in obtaining degrees.
    • These scholarships are open to any student pursuing a bachelors, masters, or doctoral degree.
    • The PMI Educational Foundation also administers scholarships established by PMI Components.
  • 8. Expanding Our Scope and Impact
    • The PMI Educational Foundation is in the process of expanding our scope and impact.
    • By doing so, we seek to provide a greater benefit to society-at-large.
    • The size and diversity of the PMI membership and components provides a wealth of resources to accomplish this goal.
  • 9. Expanding Our Scope and Impact
    • We will build on our existing programs through the pursuit of the following initiatives:
      • Endowing scholarships for project management education
      • Project learning educational initiatives for primary and secondary students
      • Humanitarian outreach through disaster-related project management programs
  • 10. Project Management Scholarships
  • 11. Types of Scholarships
    • The PMI Educational Foundation currently administers two types of scholarships:
      • PMI Endowed Scholarships
      • Component Funded Scholarships
    • The PMI Educational Foundation also administers a minority scholarship sponsored by an individual donor.
    • Scholarships are available to students pursuing both undergraduate and graduate degrees.
  • 12. PMI Endowed Scholarships
    • The PMI Endowed scholarships are open to all students pursuing a degree in a project management field of study.
    • Two scholarships are for undergraduate students while the third is for a student earning a graduate degree.
    • The PMI Endowed scholarships have been named in honor of the contributions of the PMI Founders, PMI Fellows, and Matthew H. Parry.
  • 13. Component Funded Scholarships
    • Component Funded scholarships are open to students pursuing either undergraduate or graduate degrees in a project management-related field of study.
    • These scholarships are more restrictive in nature and have criteria established by the funding component.
    • Eligibility for these scholarships is commonly limited by geography.
    • These scholarships are named for the sponsoring Component or in honor of an individual.
  • 14. 2006 Scholarship Statistics
    • Almost 1800 applications were received for the 14 different scholarships.
      • This is an average of over 120 applications per award.
    • The total value of these 14 awards was US$27,000.
      • This is an average of about US$2,000 per recipient.
  • 15. The Need for Increased Scholarships
    • More academic programs + Increasing cost of education = More students with greater financial need
  • 16. The Need for Increased Scholarships
    • In the past five years, the number of post-secondary project management degree programs world-wide has increased from less than 20 to over 200.*
    • The cost of a college education continues to rise.
    • Average costs for tuition, fees, room and board exceed:
      • US$12,000 for a four-year, public institution
      • US$29,000 for a four-year, private institution per year.**
    • * Source: Global Accreditation Center for Project Management (GAC)
    • ** Source: The College Board
  • 17. Increased Demand for Project Mangers
    • It is expected that there will be a global shortfall of educated, trained, and qualified project managers.
    • 62% of international CEOs indicated that they anticipated an increase in the utilization of project managers over the next few years.*
    • * Source: 2005 PMI Survey of Executives
  • 18. Benefits of an Endowment
    • By establishing a scholarship endowment, the PMI Educational Foundation can increase the quantity and value of awards.
    • An endowment would also provide a sustainable source of funding for the scholarships.
    • Through sound fiscal management and by adopting a strict spending policy, the endowment would grow in perpetuity.
  • 19. Why Project Learning? Project Learning and Leadership for the 21 st Century
  • 20. The Project Learning Partnership
  • 21. Two great examples of programs that aim to promote and support Project Learning
  • 22. Two great examples of programs that aim to promote and support Project Learning
  • 23. What is Project Learning?
    • Students working in teams to
    • experience and explore
    • relevant , real-world
    • problems , questions ,
    • issues , and challenges ;
    • then creating
    • presentations and
    • products to share what they have learned
  • 24. What is Project Learning?
    • The teacher’s role
    • is one of coach –
    • facilitator , guide ,
    • advisor and mentor ,
    • not directing and
    • managing all student work
  • 25. What is Project Learning?
    • The teacher’s role
    • is also one of project
    • designer , developer ,
    • architect and planner ,
    • creating and designing important parts of the project learning experience
  • 26. What are PL’s Key Features?
    • Project-centered
    • Open-ended
    • Real-world
    • Student-centered
    • Constructive
    • Collaborative
    • 7. Creative
    • 8. Communication-driven
    • 9. Research-based
    • 10. Technology- powered
    • 11. 21C Reform- friendly
    • 12. Hard but fun!
  • 27. Why Project Learning Now? Teacher-directed Direct Instruction Knowledge Content Basic Skills Theory Curriculum Individual Classroom Summative Assessed Learning for School
  • 28. Why Project Learning Now? Teacher-directed Direct Instruction Knowledge Content Basic Skills Theory Curriculum Individual Classroom Summative Assessed Learning for School Student-directed Collaborative Construction Skills Process Higher-order Thinking Practice Life Skills Group Community Formative Evaluation Learning for Life A Better Balance
  • 29. Why Project Learning Now? New Learning about Learning!
    • Context – Real-world learning
    • Caring – Intrinsic motivation
    • Construction – Mental & virtual model-building
    • Competence – Multiple intelligences
    • Community – Learning socially in groups & teams
  • 30. Why Project Learning Now? Learning Power Tools!
    • Conversing & Sharing
    • Searching & Exploring
    • Collecting & Organizing
    • Modeling & Simulating
    • Creating & Constructing
  • 31. Why Project Learning Now? New Digital Native Learners!
    • Multitasking
    • Multimedia learning
    • Online social networking
    • Online info searching
    • Games, simulations & creative expressions
  • 32.  
  • 33. Why Project Learning Now? The World is Flat! and Projects are the “Currency Units” of modern Knowledge Work
  • 34. Why Project Learning Now? The World is Flat! “ When I was growing up my parents used to say to me, ‘Tom finish your dinner – people in China and India are starving.’ My advice to [students now] is ‘Finish your homework – people in China and India are starving for your jobs.’ ” Tom Friedman
  • 35. Why Project Learning Now? The World is Flat! and all knowledge workers everywhere need 21 st Century skills to compete!
  • 36. Why Project Learning Now?
  • 37. Why Project Learning Now?
  • 38. Why Project Learning Now? 3Rs X 7Cs = 21 st Century Learning The New Learning Formula
  • 39. Why Project Learning Now? 21 st Century Skills
  • 40.
    • Information searching & researching
    • Critical analysis
    • Summarizing & synthesizing
    • Inquiry, questioning & exploratory investigations
    • Design & problem-solving
    What Skills Does PL Develop? Critical-thinking and Problem-solving
  • 41. What Skills Does PL Develop? Critical-thinking and Problem-solving
  • 42. What Skills Does PL Develop?
    • Team formation
    • Decision-making
    • Leadership
    • Team & individual accountability
    • Conflict management & team dynamics
    • Project & time management
      • Project & role definitions
      • Goal & objective setting
      • Task & milestone management
    Collaboration, Teamwork & Leadership
  • 43. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle
  • 44. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge
  • 45. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Teaming & Knowledge Sharing
  • 46. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Teaming & Knowledge Sharing Plan Project Planning Scope, Timelines, Resources, Communications, Quality, Risks
  • 47. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Teaming & Knowledge Sharing Do Researching & Documenting Plan Project Planning Scope, Timelines, Resources, Communications, Quality, Risks
  • 48. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Teaming & Knowledge Sharing Communicating Do Researching & Documenting Plan Project Planning Scope, Timelines, Resources, Communications, Quality, Risks
  • 49. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Teaming & Knowledge Sharing Communicating Do Researching & Documenting Presenting Plan Project Planning Scope, Timelines, Resources, Communications, Quality, Risks
  • 50. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Teaming & Knowledge Sharing Communicating Do Researching & Documenting Presenting Review Evaluating Plan Project Planning Scope, Timelines, Resources, Communications, Quality, Risks
  • 51. What Skills Does PL Develop? The Project Learning Cycle Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Teaming & Knowledge Sharing Communicating Do Researching & Documenting Presenting Review Evaluating Reflecting Plan Project Planning Scope, Timelines, Resources, Communications, Quality, Risks
  • 52. What Skills Does PL Develop? From the Thomas-Killman Conflict Mode Instrument Collaboration, Teamwork & Leadership
  • 53.
    • Global awareness
    • Cultural sensitivity
    • Creative conflict mediation
    What Skills Does PL Develop? Cross-cultural Understanding
  • 54.
    • Oral & written skills
    • Presentation skills
    • Media design
      • Content design
      • Visual design
      • Navigation design
      • Interaction design
    What Skills Does PL Develop? Communications & Info Literacy
  • 55.
    • Personal info management
    • Project & time tracking
    • Graphics production
    • Web development
    • Media production
    What Skills Does PL Develop? Computing & ICT Literacy
  • 56.
    • Learning styles awareness
    • Self-awareness
    • Self-direction
    • Personal productivity
    • Self-confidence
    What Skills Does PL Develop? Career & Learning Self-reliance
  • 57.
    • Brainstorming
    • Creative thinking
    • Creative design
    • Experimenting
    • Prototyping
    • Inventing & Innovating
    What Skills Does PL Develop? Creativity & Innovation
  • 58. What Skills Does PL Develop? To learn collaboration, work in teams. To learn critical thinking, take on complex problems. To learn oral communications, present. To learn written communications, write. To learn technology, use technology. To develop citizenship, take on civic and global issues. To learn about careers, do internships. To learn content, research and do all of the above. Summary
  • 59. What Does PL Research Say?
    • More popular than traditional instruction
    • Increases attendance, self-reliance
    • Equal or better at producing basic skills
    • Learning quality enhanced through use and learning of higher-order thinking skills
    • Promotes 21 st Century skills (7Cs)
    • Reaches diverse learning styles
    • Promotes teacher collaboration
    • Lacks effective formative & summative assessments of all skills learned
    • Needs lots of planning & support to do well
    From “A Review of Research on Project-based Learning,” John Thomas, the Autodesk Foundation, 2000
  • 60. The Future? Innovation PL!
    • “ Extreme Project Learning” that adds
    • innovation-producing methods to PL
    • to meet rising demands for creativity and innovation through high-performance , self-reliant , collaborative learning teams.
    “ The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done. ” Jean Piaget
  • 61. The PL Project Cycles Define Goal-Setting Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Teaming & Knowledge Sharing Communicating Do Researching & Documenting Presenting Review Evaluating Reflecting Plan Project Planning Scope, Timelines, Resources, Communications, Quality, Risks
  • 62. The IPL Project Cycles Define Goal-Setting Real-world Problem, Question Issue or Challenge Diverse Teaming & Knowledge Sharing Communicating & Prototyping Do Researching Multiple Perspectives & Documenting Presenting, Implementing & Testing Review Evaluating w. Diverse Audiences Reflecting Plan Project Planning Scope, Timelines, Resources, Communications, Quality, Risks
  • 63. The IPL Project Team
    • Learning
    • Anthropologist: people watcher
    • Experimenter: lets-try-it-and-find out
    • Cross-pollinator: social butterfly
    • Organizing
    • Hurdler: problem-solver
    • Collaborator: team builder
    • Director: get-it-done person
    • Building
    • Experience Architect: party planner
    • Set Designer: lets-build-it person
    • Storyteller: did-you-hear-about-it person
    • Caregiver: helper and supporter
  • 64. Why IPL Now?
    • Innovation and creativity are priceless skills that all countries now need
    • Learning through creativity, discovery, invention & innovation is compelling
    • IPL provides creative and collaborative ways to express ideas with new media
    • IPL is an engaging method to apply learning to real world problems and help create a better world
  • 65. IPL Programs
      • ThinkQuest & Think.com http://www.thinkquest.org/ & http://www.think.com/
      • iEARN & Global School Net http://www.iearn.org/ & http://www.gsn.org/
      • Destination Imagination http://www.idodi.org/
      • FIRST Robotics http://www.usfirst.org/
      • The Tech Museum Design Challenge http://www.thetech.org/
      • Intel Computer Clubhouse http://www.computerclubhouse.org/index.htm
  • 66. Why Project Learning?
    • That’s often how we learn best
    • That’s how technology-for-learning can best be used
    • That’s how our Digital Natives want to learn
    • That’s how knowledge work is done
    • That’s how we can learn 21 st Century skills
    • That’s how all countries will innovate
    • That’s the education challenge our schools must rise to in the 21 st Century
    • That’s what the PLP Programs bring you!
    Summary
  • 67. Disaster-Related and Humanitarian Programs
  • 68. Disaster-Related and Humanitarian Programs
    • Recent events around the world have brought the impact of disasters to the forefront of our collective conscience.
    • In an instant, both man-made and natural disasters have resulted in recovery projects of unprecedented scope and magnitude.
    • Effective project management practices are needed by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to address the challenges of response as well as development.
  • 69. Recent Global Disasters Southeastern Asian Tsunami
    • Almost 187,000 fatalities and nearly 43,000 missing from the Southeast Asian Tsunami.
    • 1.8 million people were displaced in the most severely impacted countries when over 580,000 houses were severely damaged or destroyed.*
    • Source: *UN Office of the Special Envoy for Tsunami Recovery
  • 70. Recent Global Disasters Pakistani Earthquakes
    • Magnitude 7.6 earthquake in the Kashmir region of Pakistan.
    • More than 90,000 dead, 106,000 injured, and an estimated 2.8+ million homeless.*
    • Source: *USAID
  • 71. Recent Global Disasters Hurricane Katrina
    • Hurricane Katrina was the third most deadly hurricane on record with over 1,600 fatalities and the first with more than 1,000 deaths since 1928.
    • While costs continue to rise, Katrina was the most costly hurricane on record with early estimates at US$75 billion exceeding Hurricane Andrew by over US$31 billion (in 2004 dollars).
  • 72. Increasing Frequency of Disasters Source: EM-DAT Natural Disasters Reported Number of Disasters Year
  • 73. Increasing Insured Losses Source: Swiss RE, sigma
  • 74. PMI Members Want to Help Others
    • PMI made cash donations to disaster relief agencies following recent global disasters.
    • Because there is no limit to future disasters, PMI sought ways to have more a more meaningful and lasting impact.
    • The first program was the volunteer-developed Project Management Methodology for Post-Disaster Rebuild .
  • 75. Project Management Methodology for Post-Disaster Rebuild
    • Defines a project management process for reconstruction projects following a disaster.
    • Published on CD and available to relief and training organizations alike.
    • The CD contains training materials including presentation, guide, and instructor’s manual.
  • 76. Impact of Disasters Worldwide Source: CRED
    • Between 1994 and 2003, an average of more that 255 million people were affected by natural disasters annually.
    • These same disasters claimed an average of 58,000 lives annually.
    • In 2003 alone, one in 25 people worldwide was affected by natural disasters.
  • 77. Impact of Disasters Worldwide
    • “ The key issue to remember is not the number of disasters but their economic and social impact on development and, in particular, on vulnerable populations.”
    • – Salvano Briceno, Director, International Strategy for Disaster Reduction
  • 78. The Impact of Disasters on the Poor
    • In the last 20 years, almost two million people have been killed by disasters – 98% of them living in poor countries. Source: Sida
    • 85% of those exposed to earthquakes, cyclones, floods, and droughts live in low-income countries. Source: UNDP – Development Programme of the United Nations
  • 79. The Impact of Disasters on the Poor
    • Disasters create significant setbacks to the development process by diverting funds toward reconstruction and relief.
    • By focusing solely on emergency response very little is being done to reduce the vulnerability of the poor who live in areas prone to disasters.
  • 80. Disaster-Related and Humanitarian Programs
    • Sponsor the creation of a global network to help develop disaster-related project management methodologies, tools, and best practices.
    • Foster the formation of a network of international university-based centers for applied disaster-related project management research and education.
  • 81. Disaster-Related and Humanitarian Programs
    • Collaborate with Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) and relief professionals to create programs that help increase their project management capacity for ground-level humanitarian relief and development activities.
    • Develop training programs in humanitarian development and disaster-related project management areas of specialty.
  • 82. Project Management and Humanitarian Organizations
    • Members of the humanitarian relief community have expressed their need for training in project management fundamentals.
    • Several organizations are pursuing their own project management training initiatives or already have them in place.
    • As the recognized global leader in project management, there is an opportunity for the PMI Educational Foundation to add value to their programs.
  • 83. Status of New PMIEF Programs Scholarships
    • Fourteen annual scholarships currently exist
      • Three endowed by PMI
      • Ten sponsored by Components
      • One funded by a PMIEF Donor
    • Currently investigating options with respect to establishing a scholarship endowment.
      • For example, a US$2,000,000 endowment with a 5% spending policy would provide four times the amount PMIEF is presently able to award.
    • Always seeking partners to endow scholarships.
  • 84. Status of New PMIEF Programs Project Learning Educational Initiatives
    • Several programs are being evaluated for inclusion in the project learning educational initiatives.
    • Included in this process is the Project Learning Partnership that Mr. Trilling discussed earlier.
    • One current program involves identifying how best to include project management fundamentals into existing project learning educational initiatives.
    • Another program is focused on utilizing mentors to mentors to help educators incorporate project learning into the curricula at their local schools.
  • 85. Status of New PMIEF Programs Disaster-Related and Humanitarian Programs
    • Establishing relationships with leading NGOs and universities to develop program content.
    • Mr. John Cable, Director, Project Management Program at the University of Maryland, is conducting research to assist the PMI Educational Foundation in the development of these programs.
  • 86. Status of New PMIEF Programs Disaster-Related and Humanitarian Programs
    • Mr. Cable and his associates are conducting a survey of existing disaster-related research programs at universities around the world to identify potential partners for the planned global network of centers.
    • Meetings are being scheduled with other potential partners to discuss ways to better integrate project management into disaster recovery and rebuilding systems and methodologies.
  • 87. How Your Component Can Participate
    • Endow a scholarship through the Educational Foundation.
    • Share your educational outreach programs with the Project Learning Partnership.
    • Participate in a pilot program in the development of the project learning educational initiatives.
  • 88. How Your Component Can Participate
    • Volunteer your time as a Subject Matter Expert in the development of the Project Learning and humanitarian programs.
    • Share your ideas on how to improve these programs with the Educational Foundation.
  • 89. Discussion
  • 90. Thank You