BCI Brain Wrestling Game
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BCI Brain Wrestling Game

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BCI Brain Wrestling Game BCI Brain Wrestling Game Presentation Transcript

  • Brain Wrestling COGS160 Jimmy Nonno: Software debugging/development Joanne Shin: Hardware implementation Melissa Wedeen: Neuroscience & HCI design
  • ● Brain Wrestling is similar to arm wrestling ○ Difference: no physical contact between "arm" and player ○ Controlled by "meditation" and "attention" levels measured by NeuroSky Mindset Objective: Create an Interactive Mind- Controlled Game
  • Hardware/Mechanical ● Goal: Integrate Arduino and Mindset ○ Move Servo with Mindset ● How does a microcontroller work? ○ Upload Program, no need for computer ○ Compact, mobile game ● Challenge: ○ Mindset communicates via Bluetooth, Arduino does not have Bluetooth Capability ○ Integrate Bluetooth module & Arduino ● Mechanical Constraints ○ Acrylic "arm" and housing ○ Win/Lose LEDs taken out ○ Servo Torque specs
  • Software ● Code written in the Arduino Language ○ C/C++ Functions ● Template Code ○ Reads in data from headset and assigns it to a variable ○ Lights up LEDs based on values of Meditation and Attention ● Data Values ○ Raw wave value ○ Brainwaves ■ Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma ○ Attention and Meditation
  • eSense Values ● Attention and Meditation ○ Attention - How well the user is focusing ■ Stare at a single point on the screen ○ Meditation - How relaxed the user is ■ Try to relax, close eyes ● NeuroSky's Algorithms ○ Calculating eSense ■ Headset amplifies raw brainwave signal ■ Removes ambient noise and muscle movement ■ Algorithm applied to remaining signal ○ Values aren't actually numbers, but ranges of activity
  • eSense Ranges eSense Range Interpretation 1 - 20 Strongly lowered levels 20-40 Reduced levels 40-60 Neutral level 60-80 Slightly Elevated 80-100 Elevated
  • LED Bar and Position Meditation/Attention Number of LEDs ON Servo Motor Step 1 - 9 1 +25 Degrees 10 - 19 2 +20 Degrees 20 - 29 3 +15 Degrees 30 - 39 4 +10 Degrees 40 - 49 5 +5 Degrees 50 - 59 6 0 Degrees 60 - 69 7 -5 Degrees 70 - 79 8 -10 Degrees 80 - 89 9 -15 Degrees 90 - 99 10 -20 Degrees 100 10 -25 Degrees
  • Neuroscience ● Focus: High beta and gamma, low alpha ● Meditation: High alpha ● Used code provided by Neurosky
  • How to make game more difficult? Rejected Ideas: ● Increasingly difficult visual searches ○ But we wanted users to focus on the brain wrestling ● Distracting stimuli - sudden sounds, flashes ○ However, user may focus on distracting stimuli ○ May make user experience unpleasant
  • Increasing Difficulty ● Attention-switch costs would make game more difficult ○ Switch between meditation and attention ● Meditation is more difficult than focus, especially because user has eyes open during game. Divided into different modes/levels: ● Training - Computer does not "fight back" ● Focus - "easy" mode, attention ● Zen - "intermediate" mode, meditation ● Challenge - switch between Focus and Zen
  • Design - "Arm" shape ● Considered making the "arm" look like an actual arm ○ Phantom limb/Mirror neuron theory ○ User would be able to relate to the arm, and make the experience more natural ○ However, the housing would not fit, so it would not look like a real hand anyway. ● So, we decided to make it a brain ○ Potential users liked that idea more ○ More "iconic" for our "brain wrestling" game
  • Design - Info/Status Display ● LED lights denote different modes ○ LED light lights up for the mode that the user is playing on (e.g. LED next to Train lights up) ○ Different colors make mode easy to discriminate ○ Placement - close to the "brain" at the top, in user's realm of vision ● Status bar provides a more accurate visual feedback system for user ○ Status bar fills up from right to left in same direction that user pushes arm. ● Arrow points from right to left - English- speakers read left to right.
  • Looking Forward ● User testing/characterization ■ Timing & Difficulty ■ Different user groups ● Anticipated results ■ We think that people with ADHD will find the game more difficult when they are off medication ● Potential application: ○ Neurofeedback for children diagnosed with ADHD ● Player vs. Player
  • Discussion ● Questions?