2012 Calendar YearHudson Valley FocusThe Economic Impact ofTourism in New York
2Regional Summary
3Traveler spending by region New York State isdivided into 11economic regions. New York City is thelargest single touris...
4Reliance on tourism Tourism is an integralpart of every region’seconomy, generatingfrom 6% to 18% ofemployment. Tourism...
5Business DayRegional Detail forHudson Valley
6Hudson Valley, county distributionBusiness Day Tourism in the Hudson Valleyregion is a $3.1 billionindustry, supporting ...
7Hudson Valley, total tourism impactTotal TourismImpact, 2012Traveler Spend000Labor Income,000EmploymentLocal Taxes000Stat...
8Hudson Valley, traveler spending Travelers spent $3.1 billion inthe Hudson Valley region in2012 across a diverse rangeof...
9Hudson Valley, traveler spending2012 Traveler Spend000sLodging Recreation F&BRetail & SvcStationsTransportSecondHomesTota...
10Regional growthTraveler Spend 000s 2010 2011 20122012 / 2011%Columbia 101,550$ 108,142$ 126,631$ 17.1%Dutchess 451,584$ ...
11Hudson Valley, labor incomeBusiness Day Tourism in the Hudson Valley region generated more than $1 billion in directlab...
12Day 3.8% of all labor income in theHudson Valley region isgenerated by tourism. Columbia County is the mostdependent u...
13Business Day2012 Tourism LaborIncome, 000DirectTotal (Direct,Indir., Induced)Share (Direct) Share (Total)Columbia $32,50...
14Hudson Valley, tourism employmentDay 6.4% of all employment in theHudson Valley region isgenerated by tourism. Dutches...
15Hudson Valley, tourism employment2012 TourismEmploymentDirectTotal (Direct, Ind.,Induced)Share (Direct) Share (Total)Col...
16Hudson Valley, tourism taxesBusiness Day Tourism in the Hudson Valleyregion generated $380 millionin state and local ta...
17Hudson Valley, tourism taxesBusiness DayTourism-GeneratedTaxes, 2012Local Taxes State Taxes Total Region ShareTax Saving...
18• Household surveys from the US Travel Association and Longwoods International have providedkey inputs in establishing t...
19• Local taxes are a build-up of individual categories (sales, occupancy, property). The model isnot equipped to deal wit...
20 Tourism Economics utilized the IMPLAN input-output model for New York State totrack the flow of sales through the econ...
21About Tourism Economics Tourism Economics, headquartered in Philadelphia, is an Oxford Economics companydedicated to pr...
22For more information:+1.610.995.9600, info@tourismeconomics.com
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NYS Tourism Impact 2012 - Hudson Valley Region

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NYS Tourism Impact 2012 - Hudson Valley Region

  1. 1. 2012 Calendar YearHudson Valley FocusThe Economic Impact ofTourism in New York
  2. 2. 2Regional Summary
  3. 3. 3Traveler spending by region New York State isdivided into 11economic regions. New York City is thelargest single tourismregion with 65% ofstate visitor spend. New York City, LongIsland and HudsonValley togethercomprise nearly 80%of New York Statetraveler spend.Traveler Spending, 2012Chautauqua-Allegheny1%Niagara4%FingerLakes5% Thous. Islands1%Adirondacks2%Cen. New York3%Capital-Saratoga3%Catskills2%Hudson Valley5%Long Island9%New York City65%
  4. 4. 4Reliance on tourism Tourism is an integralpart of every region’seconomy, generatingfrom 6% to 18% ofemployment. Tourism is mostimportant to theAdirondacks andCatskills, generating18% and 15% of totalemployment,respectively.Note: All regional and county tourism shares are calculated using QCEW (ES-202) employment and wage totals as produced bythe NYS Dept. of Labor.Tourism Share of Regional Employment 20120.0%2.0%4.0%6.0%8.0%10.0%12.0%14.0%16.0%18.0%LongIslandFingerLakesHudsonValleyCapital-SaratogaThous.IslandsNiagaraNewYorkCityCen.NewYorkChaut.-AlleghenyCatskillsAdirondacksDirect Tourism Total Tourism
  5. 5. 5Business DayRegional Detail forHudson Valley
  6. 6. 6Hudson Valley, county distributionBusiness Day Tourism in the Hudson Valleyregion is a $3.1 billionindustry, supporting 51,388jobs. Westchester Countyrepresents 53% of the region’stourism sales with $1.7 billionin traveler spending. Traveler spending in theregion increased 3.1% in2012.Traveler Spending in 2012Columbia4%Dutchess15%Orange13%Putnam2%Rockland13%Westchester53%
  7. 7. 7Hudson Valley, total tourism impactTotal TourismImpact, 2012Traveler Spend000Labor Income,000EmploymentLocal Taxes000State Taxes 000Columbia $126,631 $54,991 1,451 $8,088 $6,949Dutchess $473,561 $242,748 8,430 $32,938 $25,989Orange $430,568 $236,369 9,054 $28,785 $23,630Putnam $51,647 $24,323 1,166 $3,489 $2,834Rockland $401,234 $219,368 8,230 $25,606 $22,020Westchester $1,679,229 $944,951 23,058 $107,811 $92,156TOTAL $3,162,869 $1,722,749 51,388 $206,718 $173,578
  8. 8. 8Hudson Valley, traveler spending Travelers spent $3.1 billion inthe Hudson Valley region in2012 across a diverse rangeof sectors. Spending on food &beverages and transportationservices comprised 26% and22% of the total, respectively.Tourism SpendingLodging19%Recreation8%F&B26%Retail &SvcStations21%Transport22%SecondHomes4%
  9. 9. 9Hudson Valley, traveler spending2012 Traveler Spend000sLodging Recreation F&BRetail & SvcStationsTransportSecondHomesTotalColumbia $16,600 $10,169 $21,942 $17,353 $23,982 $36,584 $126,631Dutchess $89,496 $32,029 $107,541 $85,169 $133,032 $26,296 $473,561Orange $63,321 $19,832 $115,582 $76,169 $142,735 $12,928 $430,568Putnam $4,136 $6,821 $17,604 $10,614 $2,983 $9,489 $51,647Rockland $75,878 $43,184 $132,591 $100,866 $43,620 $5,095 $401,234Westchester $358,107 $146,017 $442,486 $359,140 $344,098 $29,381 $1,679,229TOTAL $607,537 $258,052 $837,746 $649,310 $690,449 $119,773 $3,162,869
  10. 10. 10Regional growthTraveler Spend 000s 2010 2011 20122012 / 2011%Columbia 101,550$ 108,142$ 126,631$ 17.1%Dutchess 451,584$ 467,223$ 473,561$ 1.4%Orange 384,350$ 409,286$ 430,568$ 5.2%Putnam 54,619$ 54,805$ 51,647$ -5.8%Rockland 342,453$ 369,866$ 401,234$ 8.5%Westchester 1,529,715$ 1,656,983$ 1,679,229$ 1.3%TOTAL 2,864,271$ 3,066,304$ 3,162,869$ 3.1%Local Taxes, $ 2010 2011 20122012 / 2011%Columbia 6,680,360$ 6,993,996$ 8,088,348 15.6%Dutchess 31,683,665$ 33,105,222$ 32,938,342 -0.5%Orange 26,455,189$ 27,670,542$ 28,785,397 4.0%Putnam 3,648,640$ 3,819,026$ 3,489,298 -8.6%Rockland 24,178,663$ 23,779,760$ 25,606,304 7.7%Westchester 101,884,242$ 106,943,926$ 107,810,765 0.8%TOTAL 194,530,759$ 202,312,472$ 206,718,455 2.2%State Taxes, $ 2010 2011 20122012 / 2011%Columbia 5,704,562$ 5,967,344$ 6,949,481 16.5%Dutchess 25,367,565$ 25,781,648$ 25,989,026 0.8%Orange 21,590,724$ 22,584,669$ 23,629,540 4.6%Putnam 3,068,207$ 3,024,159$ 2,834,360 -6.3%Rockland 19,237,185$ 20,409,462$ 22,019,692 7.9%Westchester 85,931,250$ 91,433,377$ 92,156,040 0.8%TOTAL 160,899,494$ 169,200,660$ 173,578,140 2.6%
  11. 11. 11Hudson Valley, labor incomeBusiness Day Tourism in the Hudson Valley region generated more than $1 billion in directlabor income and $1.7 billion including indirect and induced impacts. Tourism is most significant in Westchester County, generating $944 million inlabor income.Tourism-Generated Labor Income$0$100$200$300$400$500$600$700$800$900$1,000ColumbiaDutchessOrangePutnamRocklandWestchesterMillionsIndirect/Induced Direct
  12. 12. 12Day 3.8% of all labor income in theHudson Valley region isgenerated by tourism. Columbia County is the mostdependent upon tourism with7.2% of all labor incomegenerated by visitors.Tourism-Generated Labor IncomeShare of Economy, 2012Hudson Valley, labor income0.0% 2.0% 4.0% 6.0% 8.0%ColumbiaDutchessOrangePutnamRocklandWestchesterTOTALShare of EconomyShare (Total)Share (Direct)
  13. 13. 13Business Day2012 Tourism LaborIncome, 000DirectTotal (Direct,Indir., Induced)Share (Direct) Share (Total)Columbia $32,502 $54,991 4.3% 7.2%Dutchess $143,475 $242,748 2.7% 4.5%Orange $139,705 $236,369 2.6% 4.4%Putnam $14,376 $24,323 1.2% 2.1%Rockland $129,656 $219,368 2.2% 3.7%Westchester $558,509 $944,951 2.1% 3.6%TOTAL $1,018,222 $1,722,749 2.3% 3.8%Hudson Valley, labor income
  14. 14. 14Hudson Valley, tourism employmentDay 6.4% of all employment in theHudson Valley region isgenerated by tourism. Dutchess County is the mostdependent upon tourism with7.7% of all employmentsustained by visitors.Tourism-Generated EmploymentShare of Economy, 20120.0% 2.0% 4.0% 6.0% 8.0%ColumbiaDutchessOrangePutnamRocklandWestchesterTOTALShare of EconomyShare (Total)Share (Direct)
  15. 15. 15Hudson Valley, tourism employment2012 TourismEmploymentDirectTotal (Direct, Ind.,Induced)Share (Direct) Share (Total)Columbia 1,009 1,451 5.0% 7.2%Dutchess 5,864 8,430 5.4% 7.7%Orange 6,298 9,054 4.9% 7.0%Putnam 811 1,166 3.3% 4.8%Rockland 5,725 8,230 5.0% 7.2%Westchester 16,039 23,058 4.0% 5.7%TOTAL 35,747 51,388 4.5% 6.4%DayTourism-Generated Employment, 201205,00010,00015,00020,00025,000ColumbiaDutchessOrangePutnamRocklandWestchesterIndirect/Induced Direct
  16. 16. 16Hudson Valley, tourism taxesBusiness Day Tourism in the Hudson Valleyregion generated $380 millionin state and local taxes in2012. Sales, property, and hotel bedtaxes contributed to $206million in local taxes. Westchester County produced53% of the region’s tourismtax base in 2012.Tourism-Generated Taxes, 2012$0$50$100$150$200$250ColumbiaDutchessOrangePutnamRocklandWestchesterMillionsLocal State
  17. 17. 17Hudson Valley, tourism taxesBusiness DayTourism-GeneratedTaxes, 2012Local Taxes State Taxes Total Region ShareTax Savings perHouseholdColumbia $8,088,348 $6,949,481 15,037,829 4.0% $586Dutchess $32,938,342 $25,989,026 58,927,368 15.5% $550Orange $28,785,397 $23,629,540 52,414,937 13.8% $420Putnam $3,489,298 $2,834,360 6,323,659 1.7% $181Rockland $25,606,304 $22,019,692 47,625,996 12.5% $485Westchester $107,810,765 $92,156,040 199,966,806 52.6% $578TOTAL $206,718,455 $173,578,140 380,296,595 100.0% $516 Were it not for tourism-generated state and local taxes, the average householdin the region would have to pay an additional $516 to maintain the same level ofgovernment revenue.
  18. 18. 18• Household surveys from the US Travel Association and Longwoods International have providedkey inputs in establishing traveler spending figures. Industry data on lodging, airports, Amtrak, andattractions contribute to year-over-year growth analysis.• Employment definitions. The basis of our data and modeling is the Regional EconomicInformation System (REIS), Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce. This isdifferent than the NYS Department of Labor data source (ES202/QCEW). The main definitionaldifference is that sole-proprietors, which do not require unemployment insurance and are notcounted in the ES202 data. BEA data shows (for example) state accommodations employment at89,124, compared with QCEW at 82,190. For total employment (across all sectors), the differenceis 20%.• International methodology. Our approach (through Travel Industry Association calculations) isbased the estimates on direct survey responses to the Department of Commerce in-flight surveyand Statistics Canada data – constrained to BEA international balance of payments data. The NYdata are consistent with TIA’s state-by-state distribution which ensures against overestimation.• All employment and income results are constrained to known industry measurements for keytourism sectors.Methods and data sources
  19. 19. 19• Local taxes are a build-up of individual categories (sales, occupancy, property). The model isnot equipped to deal with individual exemptions such as Indian gaming.• Second home expenditures are based on the stock of seasonal second home inventory.Annual average expenditures for housing are pro-rated to the season length to account forvarious levels of expenditures not accounted in visitor surveys.• Lodging sector. Our models use survey information and constrains this to the value of thehotel sector in each county. This can vary from certain bed tax estimates of total revenue forseveral reasons. One is that the bed tax may only be based on room revenue while total salesfor the industry may include other revenue sources (room service, phone, etc.). Another isthat certain smaller establishments may not fully report or be required to report their revenue.Methods and data sources
  20. 20. 20 Tourism Economics utilized the IMPLAN input-output model for New York State totrack the flow of sales through the economy to the generation of GDP, employment,wages, and taxes. The impacts are measured on three levels:■ Direct impact: The immediate benefit to persons and companies directlyproviding goods or services to travelers.■ Indirect impact: The secondary benefit to suppliers of goods and services to thedirectly-involved companies. For example, a food wholesaler providing goods toa restaurant. The model is careful to exclude imports from the impactcalculations.■ Induced impact: The tertiary benefit to the local economy as incomes in theprior two levels of impact are spent on goods and services. For example, arestaurant employee spends his wages at a grocery store, generating additioneconomic output.Methods and data sources
  21. 21. 21About Tourism Economics Tourism Economics, headquartered in Philadelphia, is an Oxford Economics companydedicated to providing high value, robust, and relevant analyses of the tourism sectorthat reflects the dynamics of local and global economies. By combining quantitativemethods with industry knowledge, Tourism Economics designs custom marketstrategies, project feasibility analysis, tourism forecasting models, tourism policyanalysis, and economic impact studies. Our staff have worked with over 100 destinations to quantify the economic value oftourism, forecast demand, guide strategy, or evaluate tourism policies. Oxford Economics is one of the world’s leading providers of economic analysis,forecasts and consulting advice. Founded in 1981 as a joint venture with OxfordUniversity’s business college, Oxford Economics is founded on a reputation for highquality, quantitative analysis and evidence-based advice. For this, it draws on its ownstaff of 40 highly-experienced professional economists; a dedicated data analysisteam; global modeling tools; close links with Oxford University, and a range of partnerinstitutions in Europe, the US and in the United Nations Project Link. For more information: info@tourismeconomics.com.
  22. 22. 22For more information:+1.610.995.9600, info@tourismeconomics.com
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