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Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)
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Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)

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  • 1. Parties and Elections in California Anagnoson et al., chapter 4
  • 2. California’s weak political parties
    • Reforms from the Progressive Era
      • Presidential and partisan primaries
      • Nonpartisan elections
      • Office block ballots
      • Cross-filing (until 1959)
  • 3. Changes in CA Party Registration, 1978-2009
  • 4. Party Registration by Age
  • 5. Party Registration by Gender
  • 6. Party Registration by Education
  • 7. Party Registration by Race/Ethnicity
  • 8. Party Registration by Nativity
  • 9. Figure 4.3 Percent Difference between Democratic and Republican Registration by County (2008 Presidential Primary) Governing California in the Twenty-first Century , 3rd Edition Copyright © 2011 W.W. Norton & Company
  • 10. CA Population and Voter Registration, 1978-2009
  • 11. CA Voter Turnout
  • 12. Qualified Third Parties
    • American Independent, Green, Libertarian & Peace and Freedom Parties
    • Relatively easy for third parties to get on the ballot
      • By registration (1% of voters in past general election)
      • By petition (10% of voters in past general election)
  • 13. Staying Qualified
    • To stay qualified, a party must past both of the following tests:
      • One of its candidates for statewide office must receive at least 2% of the vote in any gubernatorial election.
      • The party must maintain at least 1/15 of 1% of the total registration.
        • The Peace and Freedom Party was removed from the ballot in 2000 for failing to meet these requirements, but re-qualified in 2003.
  • 14. Can Third Party Candidates Win?
    • In March 1999, Green Party member Audie Bock, 53, bested Democrat Elihu Harris in a special election to the Assembly, winning by just 327 votes out of 29,021 cast (turnout was 15%).
      • Bock was the first third-party candidate to be elected to the state's legislature since 1917.
    • Bock lost (running as an Independent) in November 2000 to Democrat Wilma Chan.
    News clip
  • 15. Why Did Audie Bock Win?
    • Feb. 1998: Ron Dellums retires from Congress
    • April 1998: State Senator Barbara Lee elected to replace Dellums
    • Sept. 1998/Nov. 1998: State Assemblyman Don Perata elected to replace Lee
    • Feb. 1999: Elihu Harris (D): 49%, Frank Russo (D): 37%, Audie Bock (G): 8.7%
    • March 1999: “Chicken-dinner" vouchers
  • 16. Party Affiliation
    • Registration in the two major parties has declined in recent years.
    • Democrats have lost the most registrants, while Decline to States have increased.
      • 44.6% Democrats
      • 30.8% Republicans
      • 20.1% Decline to State
      • (report)
  • 17. Party Registration by County
    • Democratic areas (blue) tend to be coastal and urban.
    • Republican areas (red) tend to be inland and rural.
      • Although most counties are red, most Californians live in the blue counties
  • 18. The Battle Over the Primary
    • Until 1998, closed system
    • 1996: Proposition 198, blanket primaries
      • Ruled unconstitutional, 2000
    • June 2010: Proposition 14, Top Two
  • 19. Moving the Primary
    • Until 2000, California held its primary elections in June.
      • Left California out of the presidential nominating game.
    • Switch to early March in 2000 and 2004
    • Back to June for 2006
    • February AND June for 2008 (Prop 93)
    • 2012?
  • 20. Proposition 93
    • Limits on Legislators’ Terms in Office. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
    • Reduces the total amount of time a person may serve in the state legislature from 14 years to 12 years. Allows a person to serve a total of 12 years either in the Assembly, the Senate, or a combination of both. Provides a transition period to allow current members to serve a total of 12 consecutive years in the house in which they are currently serving, regardless of any prior service in another house.
  • 21. Next Local Election: 11/08/11
    • County Registrar
    • Menlo College polling place: Fireside Lounge
    • Nov. 5-7, Menlo College Get-Out-the-Vote effort (with Dr. McCabe)

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