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September 19 (101) Presentation Transcript

  • 1. February 24, 2011
    Click to let me know you are here!
  • 2. Annotations check on page 370!!!
  • 3. Adjectives and Adverbs
  • 4. Adjectives and Adverbs
    Adjectives
    1. Typically answer the question Which? or What kind?
    2. Modify nouns or pronouns
  • 5. Adjectives and Adverbs
    Adverbs
    1. Answer the question How? When? Where? or sometimes Why?
    2. Modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs 
  • 6. Adjectives and Adverbs
    Faulty: Karen bought her car quick.
    Revised: Karen bought her car quickly.
  • 7. Adjectives and Adverbs
    Faulty: It’s awful hot today.
    Revised: It’s awfully hot today.
  • 8. Adjectives and Adverbs
    Use good as an adjective and well as an adverb.
    Al’s skin healed well after surgery.
    This sandwich tastes good.
  • 9. Good vs. Well
    So what should you answer when someone asks, “How are you?”
    “I am good.”
    “I am well.”
  • 10. Let’s ask…
    Grammar Girl!
  • 11. How are you?
    I am well.
    I am good.
  • 12. Good vs. Well
    Well is an adverb and therefore modifies verbs
    Good is an adjective and therefore modifies nouns
    But it is not that simple…
  • 13. Action Verbs
    Describe actions
    Verbs such as run, jump, and swim are all action verbs
    He runs well; she jumps well; they swim well.
  • 14. Linking Verbs
    Linking verbs aren't about actions as much as they are about connecting other words together.
    To be is the quintessential linking verb.
  • 15. He is yellow.
  • 16. Linking Verbs
    Other linking verbs include seem, appear, look, become, and verbs that describe senses, such as feel and smell.
  • 17. Some verbs are linking and action.
    A trick that will help you figure out if you're dealing with a linking verb is to see if you can replace the verb with a form of to be; if so, then it's probably a linking verb.
  • 18. How to Test for a Linking Verb
    He feels bad.
    He feels badly.
    is
    Linking
    is
    Action
  • 19. Good vs. Well
    It's standard to use adjectives—such as good—after linking verbs.
    Am is a linking verb, and you use adjectives after linking verbs.
    I am good.
  • 20. Good vs. Well
    Well is reserved to mean “healthy” when it's used in this way.
    So if you are recovering from a long illness and someone is inquiring about your health, it's appropriate to say, “I am well,” but if you're just describing yourself on a generally good day and nobody's asking specifically about your health, a more appropriate response is, “I am good.”
  • 21. Good vs. Well
    He swam good.
    well
  • 22. I know what you are thinking…
    …will Grammar Girl please explain the difference between bad and badly?
    You are in luck!
  • 23. CNN Interview
    Grammar Girl, some people are nervous to write to you.
    I feel bad about that.
  • 24. Bad vs. Badly
    Say you feel bad when you are expressing an emotion.
    To say, “I feel badly,” implies that there's something wrong with your sense of touch.
  • 25. Bad vs. Badly
    Badly is an adverb, meaning that it modifies a verb.
    So when you say, “I feel badly,” the adverb badly relates to the verb feel.
    Since feel means "to touch things," feeling badly means you're having trouble touching things.
  • 26. Bad vs. Badly
    I feel madly.
    I feel sadly.
  • 27. Bad vs. Badly
    I smell bad.
    I smell badly.
  • 28. Bad vs. Badly
    It went badly.
    She behaved badly.
  • 29. Practice:
    1. Credit card debt is becoming increasing common among college students, who have expenses but do not work full-time.
    2. Nearly all credit card companies try to convince students to apply by offering introductory rates that are enticingly low.
    Unfortunately, when juggling multiple credit cards, many students lose sight of how rapid the debt is accumulating.
    It is a well idea to charge only as much as you can pay in full each month.
    He didn’t shower before he came to my house, so he smelled badly.
  • 30. 1. Credit card debt is becoming increasing common among college students, who have expenses but do not work full-time.
    increasing
    increasingly
  • 31. 2. Nearly all credit card companies try to convince students to apply by offering introductory rates that are enticingly low.
    enticing
    enticingly
  • 32. 3. Unfortunately, when juggling multiple credit cards, many students lose sight of how rapid the debt is accumulating.
    rapid
    rapidly
  • 33. 4. It is a well idea to charge only as much as you can pay in full each month.
    well
    good
  • 34. 5. He didn’t shower before he came to my house, so he smelled badly.
    badly
    bad
  • 35. “Alone Together”
    Colbert Report Interview
  • 36. “I Just Called to Say I Love You”page 366
    Do you have a cell phone? A. Yes B. No
    General reactions?
    Public vs. Private Sphere
    Cell phone culture?
    If you agree with Franzen, can we go back?
  • 37. Introduction to Afghanistan
    The Kite Runner
    By Khaled Hosseini
  • 38. The Road to Bamiyan, Afghanistan © 2008 Carl Montgomery
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/carlmontgomery/3068056966
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 39. Geography
    Landlocked and rugged- ¾ of the land is mountainous
    Smaller than Texas
    Borders China, Iran, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan
    Divided by high passes restricting travel- 72 hours by road from Jalabad to Peshawar before the tunnel
    Continental extremes in temperature- -25 to 46
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 40. Afghanistan
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 41. Ethnic Groups
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 42. Ethnic and Religious Divisions
    Afghanistan is made up of many different ethnic and religious groups- Pashtun, Tajik, Uzbek and Hazara
    People of different races and faiths
    Islam is the main religion- divided into Sunnis and Shi’as
    Political rather than religious division
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 43. Branches of Islam
    The division between Sunnis and Shi'as is the largest and oldest in the history of Islam.
    They both agree on the fundamentals of Islam and share the same Holy Book (The Qur'an), but there are differences mostly derived from their different historical experiences, political and social developments, as well as ethnic composition.
    These differences originate from the question of who would succeed the Prophet Muhammad as leader of the emerging Muslim community after his death. To understand them, we need to know a bit about the Prophet's life and political and spiritual legacy.
    When the Prophet Muhammad died in the early 7th century he left not only the religion of Islam but also a community of about one hundred thousand Muslims organised as an Islamic state on the Arabian Peninsula. It was the question of who should succeed the Prophet and lead the fledgling Islamic state that created the divide.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 44. Branches of Islam
    The larger group of Muslims chose Abu Bakr, a close Companion of the Prophet, as the Caliph (politico-social leader) and he was accepted as such by much of the community which saw the succession in political and not spiritual terms. However another smaller group, which also included some of the senior Companions, believed that the Prophet's son-in-law and cousin, Ali, should be Caliph. They understood that the Prophet had appointed him as the sole interpreter of his legacy, in both political and spiritual terms. In the end Abu Bakr was appointed First Caliph.
    Muslims who believe that Abu Bakr should have been the Prophet's successor have come to be known as Sunni Muslims. Those who believe Ali should have been the Prophet's successor are now known as Shi'a Muslims. It was only later that these terms came into use. Sunni means 'one who follows the Sunnah' (what the Prophet said, did, agreed to or condemned). Shi'a is a contraction of the phrase 'Shiat Ali', meaning 'partisans of Ali'.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 45. History
    The area is ruled by warlords and unstable due to conflict between rival ethnic groups- physical geography means establishing overall control is near impossible.
    Inequalities exist between ethnic groups- i.e. Hazaras are persecuted by Pashtuns and used in slavery
    19th Century: British interests in the territory lead to the Anglo-Afghan war
    20th Century- country is secular and forward thinking. Kabul is compared to Paris. 1978- becomes a republic.
    Social, economic and political inequalities persist for the Hazara- e.g. in the 1940s an exclusive Hazara tax was enforced.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 46. Hazara People
    Of Mongol descent- possibly from Genghis Khan
    Name means 1000- from military past
    Occupy mountainous areas of Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iran
    Hazarajat is main area of settlement in Afghanistan
    Secular (like most of country) until the late 1970s
    Shi’a
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 47. History Cont.
    1979- the new Republic courts left-wing communist ideals
    US are anti-communist- see McCarthyism – as they fear the influence of Russia- the largest communist state
    US (and Pakistan) bankroll and support the right-wing and Sunni Mujahedeen
    US use the Mujahedeen to fight against Russia in the escalating Cold War
    Focus on young, Islamic fundamentalists
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 48. Cold War
    Soviet Union intervene and send 100,000 troops to invade
    Afghanistan is an unstable patchwork of tribes who can’t agree on leadership
    Soviet occupation resulted in the killing of between 600,000 and 2 million Afghanis
    More than 5 million fled to Pakistan and Iran
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 49. The Emergence of the Taliban
    Soviets realize the terrain has beaten them and withdraw in 1988, leaving a power vacuum
    Seen as a victory by the US and their Mujahedeen. They leave the country to internal fighting to resolve the leadership crisis
    Elites and intellectuals flee the civil war as warlords battle for control
    1994- 10,000 die in Kabul alone
    The Taliban is from the Mujahedeen. They finally take Kabul in 1996 and establish a state- The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan
    By the end of 2000, they control 95% of the country and its resources
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 50. Seven-Year Reign of Terror
    Taliban gain control of unstable country through enforcement of strict Sharia law
    Restricted freedom
    Communists punished
    Cultural icons not Sunni Islamic destroyed- e.g. Bamiyan Buddhas
    Shi’as as seen as infidels and persecuted
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 51. Living under the Taliban
    • Sharia (Arabic: '‎شريعة Šarīʿah) is the body of Islamicreligious law. Sharia deals with many aspects of day-to-day life, including politics, economics, banking, business, contracts, family, sexuality, hygiene, and social issues.
    • 52. Privileges which women, by right, must have are equal education, job security, health services, and free time to rear a healthy generation for building the future of the country … Educating and enlightening women is now the subject of close government attention.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 53. Taliban Rules for Women
    May not work outside the home.
    May not participate in any activity outside the home unless accompanied by her husband or male relative.
    May not be treated by male doctor.
    May not study at any institutions, including schools and universities.
    Must wear the long veil (burqa) which covers them from head to toe.
    If found guilty of adultery, will be publically stoned to death.
    May not laugh loudly – no stranger should hear a woman’s voice.
    May not wear high heels – no man should hear a woman’s footsteps.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: www.saeta.org.au/files/.../The%20Kite%20Runner%20Introduction.ppt
  • 54. Taliban Rules for Everyone
    No one can listen to music.
    No one can watch television, movies or videos.
    No citizen can have a non-Islamic name.
    Men may not shave or trim their beards.
    No one may fly kites.
    In any sporting event, no one may clap.
    Anyone who converts from Islam to any other religion will be executed.
    No burying of anyone who was killed by the Taliban. Bodies must remain in the streets as examples to other ‘wrongdoers’.
    Source: Amnesty International USA The Kite Runner Companion Curriculum. http://www.amnestyusa.org/education/pdf/kiterunnerhigh.pdf Accessed on 17 February 2008, p. 40-41
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: www.saeta.org.au/files/.../The%20Kite%20Runner%20Introduction.ppt
  • 55. Living Under the Taliban
    Muslims feel that Sharia has been misunderstood by Christians, who have tended to concentrate on the demands for harsh punishments such as amputation of a hand or foot for theft and public flogging for people caught drinking alcohol.
    Under the Sharia laws in Afghanistan, the Taliban's religious police, formally known as the Department for Prevention of Vice and Promotion of Virtue, enforce the Sharia laws.
    For example, a man’s beard must be long enough to protrude from a fist clenched at the base of the chin. If it is not, he is subject to punishment.
    Women are not allowed to work in any field except the medical sector.
    Women should not go outside their residences with the exception of those working in the medical sector.
    It forbids women from wearing jewellery and make-up and from making noise with their shoes when they walk. If a woman does work outside the home, she is forbidden to sit beside the driver when traveling to and from work. Stylish dress and decoration of women is forbidden.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 56. Persecution of the Hazara
    Once the Taliban turned their focus from expelling the Soviets, they turned to Hazara ethnic nationalism
    Hazaras form the Northern Alliance, and try to defend themselves. Leader killed by Taliban in 1996. They are isolated from the world and targeted by the Taliban state.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 57. Taliban Atrocities
    “Hazaras are not Muslim, they are Shi’a. They are kafir (infidels). The Hazaras killed our force here, and now we have to kill Hazaras…If you do not show your loyalty, we will burn your houses, and we will kill you. You will either accept to be Muslim or leave Afghanistan…Wherever you go we will catch you. If you go, we will pull you down by your feet; if you hide below, we will pull you up by your hair.” 1998, Incitement of Violence against Hazaras by Governor Niazi.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 58. Mazar-i Sharif
    August 8, 1997, as vengeance for earlier ethnic conflict, Taliban massacred 8000 Hazaras
    Hundreds suffocated in crates
    Shot in homes and on street
    Hospital patients killed in their beds
    House to house searches
    Throats slit- “the Halal way”
    Children packed into a crate
    News leaks out a year later
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 59. Present Day
    Regime continues
    2001 Taliban refuse to hand over Bin Laden and West invades
    2001 Shi’as kill 2000 Pakistani Sunni soldiers left behind by the fleeing Taliban- in Mazar-i Sharif
    War continues in present day but Taliban influence is much reduced; much of country is released from Taliban rule and is a democracy
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: http://www.slideshare.net/rhiorns/afganistan-powerpoint-intro
  • 60. About the Author
    KhaledHosseini was born in Kabul, Afghanistan in 1965.
    His mother was a teacher and his father a diplomat.
    His family left Afghanistan for a posting in Paris in 1976, well before the Communist coup and the Soviet invasion. They intended to return, but sought political asylum in the US in 1980.
    He now lives in California, where he works as a doctor.
    (Sherman 2006, p.5)
    Source: Khaled Hosseini Website http://www.khaledhosseini.com/, accessed 17 February 2008.
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: www.saeta.org.au/files/.../The%20Kite%20Runner%20Introduction.ppt
  • 61. About The Kite Runner
    Hosseini states: ‘The story line of my novel is largely fictional. The characters were invented and the plot imagined. However, there certainly are, as is always the case with fiction, autobiographical elements woven through the narrative. Probably the passages most resembling my own life are the ones in the US, with Amir and Baba trying to build a new life. I, too, came to the US as an immigrant and I recall vividly those first few years in California, the brief time we spent on welfare, and the difficult task of assimilating into a new culture. My father and I did work for a while at the flea market and there really are rows of Afghans working there, some of whom I am related to.’ (Razeshta Sethna: E-mail: newsline@cyber.net.pk in Sherman 2006, p. 5)
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: www.saeta.org.au/files/.../The%20Kite%20Runner%20Introduction.ppt
  • 62. About The Kite Runner
    Hosseini ‘wanted to write about Afghanistan before the Soviet war because that is largely a forgotten period in modern Afghan history. For many people in the west, Afghanistan is synonymous with the Soviet war and the Taliban.’ He explains: ‘I wanted to remind people that Afghans had managed to live in peaceful anonymity for decades, that the history of the Afghans in the twentieth century has been largely peaceful and harmonious.’ (Newsline Publications 2001 in Sherman 2006, p. 5)
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: www.saeta.org.au/files/.../The%20Kite%20Runner%20Introduction.ppt
  • 63. About The Kite Runner
    Hosseini experienced Kabul with his brother ‘the way Amir and Hassan do: long school days in the summer, kite fighting in the winter time, westerns with John Wayne at Cinema Park, big parties at our house in Wazir Akbar Khan, picnics in Paghman.’ He has ‘very fond memories of childhood in Afghanistan, largely because [his] memories, unlike those of the current generation of Afghans, are untainted by the spectre of was, landmines, and famine.’ (Newsline Publications 2001 in Sherman 2006, p. 5)
    PowerPoint presentation adapted from the following web site: www.saeta.org.au/files/.../The%20Kite%20Runner%20Introduction.ppt
  • 64. Movie Trailer
  • 65. Kite Runner Reading Journal
  • 66. Open Lab to work on Essay #1 with my help
  • 67. Homework
    Essay #1 with rough draft and peer review behind it
    Remember, it needs to be in my hands within the first ten minutes of class or it is considered late!