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September 14 (101)
 

September 14 (101)

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    September 14 (101) September 14 (101) Presentation Transcript

    • September 14, 2011
      Click to let me know you are here!
    • Turn in rough draft
    • Go over quiz #1
    • Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement
    • 1. Pronouns agree with their antecedents in person and number.
      FAULTY: All campers should bring your knapsacks.
      Here, noun and pronoun disagree in person: campers is third person, but your is second person.
      FAULTY: Every camper should bring their knapsack.
      Here, noun and pronoun disagree in number: camper is singular, but their is plural.
      REVISED: All campers should bring their knapsacks.
      REVISED: Every camper should bring his or her knapsack.
    • 2. An antecedent that is an indefinite pronoun takes a singular pronoun.
      Either of the boys can do it, as long as he’s on time.
      Warn anybody who’s still in her swimsuit that a uniform is required for dinner.
    • 2. An antecedent that is an indefinite pronoun takes a singular pronoun.
      Sometimes the meaning of an indefinite pronoun is plural. To avoid awkwardness, avoid using such a pronoun as an antecedent.
      Tell everyone in Cabin B that I’m looking for him.
      This sentence works better if it is phrased differently.
      Tell all the campers in Cabin B that I’m looking for them.
    • 3. The pronoun agrees with its antecedent in gender.
      If one of your parents brings you to camp, invite him to stay for lunch.
      While technically correct (the singular pronoun he refers to the singular antecedent one), this sentence overlooks the fact that some parents are male, some female. To make sure the pronoun covers both, a writer has two choices.
      If one of your parents brings you to camp, invite him or her to stay for lunch.
      If your parents bring you to camp, invite them to stay for lunch.
    • Practice:
      1. Many architects find work their greatest pleasure.
       2. Each member of the sorority has to make their own bed.
       3. He is the kind of man who gets their fun out of just sipping one’s beer and watching his Saturday games on TV.
       4. Young people should know how to protect oneself against AIDS.
       5. When one enjoys one’s work, it’s easy to spend all your spare time thinking about it.
    • 1. Many architects find work their greatest pleasure.
      Many architects find work his greatest pleasure.
      Many architects find work her greatest pleasure.
      Many architects find work his or her greatest pleasure.
      All of the above
      Correct as is
    • 2. Each member of the sorority has to make their own bed.
      Members of the sorority have to make their own bed.
      Each member of the sorority has to make her own bed.
      Each member of the sorority has to make his or her own bed.
      All of the above
      Correct as is
    • 3. He is the kind of man who gets their fun out of just sipping one’s beer and watching his Saturday games on TV.
      He is the kind of man who gets his fun out of just sipping his beer and watching his Saturday games on TV.
      He is the kind of man who gets their fun out of just sipping one’s beer and watching one’s Saturday games on TV.
      He is the kind of man who gets his fun out of just sipping one’s beer and watching his Saturday games on TV.
      All of the above
      Correct as is
    • 4. Young people should know how to protect oneself against AIDS.
      Young people should know how to protect himself or herself against AIDS.
      Young people should know how to protect themselves against AIDS.
      A young person should know how to protect oneself against AIDS.
      All of the above
      Correct as is
    • 5. When one enjoys one’s work, it’s easy to spend all your spare time thinking about it.
      When one enjoys one’s work, it’s easy to spend all one’s spare time thinking about it.
      When you enjoy your work, it’s easy to spend all your spare time thinking about it.
      Both A and B
      None of the above
      Correct as is
    • How to Peer Review
    • Peer Review? What is that?
      Objective feedback
      Seeing someone’s text from your own perspective
      Explaining to them how you ‘see’ it
      Being kind, yet honest, in the process
      From Purdue OWL: Peer Review Presentation (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/712/1/)
    • The ‘Why’ of Peer Review
      Why does peer review work?
      We see our writing ‘through’ another person
      We see how other students think and write
      We see others’ writing strengths and weaknesses
      We see new ideas and new ways of explaining ideas
      We learn to look at our own writing in a different way
      From Purdue OWL: Peer Review Presentation (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/712/1/)
    • The ‘How’ of Peer Review
      Ways you can respond as a helpful reader:
      If you get confused or lost
      Mark an ‘X’ in the text where you are confused
      Ask the writer to explain his or her ideas
      Ask the writer to explain his or her thesis
      Ask the writer to state the question the thesis answers
      Ask the writer to fill in the blanks:
      My purpose in this paper is ______________.
      My purpose in this section is _____________.
      From Purdue OWL: Peer Review Presentation (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/712/1/)
    • The ‘How’ of Peer Review
      Ways you can respond as a helpful reader:
      If you cannot see the point:
      Ask the writer ‘So what?’ questions.
      In other words, ask the writer
      ‘What does this sentence have to do with your thesis?’
      ‘What does this point have to do with this paragraph?’
      ‘What does this paragraph have to do with the paper?’
      Playing devil’s advocate
      Counter the writer’s stance or thesis
      Bring up other perspectives
      Ask the writer ‘why’ and ‘how’ questions
      Offer more examples and details to the writer
      Leave the final decisions to the writer
      From Purdue OWL: Peer Review Presentation (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/712/1/)
    • Peer Review Format
      Read your essay aloud. You are allowed to stop and write all over your paper. The rest of the group is not allowed to comment whatsoever (even after you are finished). Everyone reads aloud first.
      Decide which color highlighter will represent you in the group.
      Decide as a group how much time you have for each essay. Remember, you will need time at the end to discuss.
      Pass your essay and peer review sheet to the left. Peer review the essay in front of you concentrating on content, not surface errors. Highlight your comments in your color. Pretend the author of the essay is nowhere near you. All comments/questions/critiques should be written.
      Fill in the “Editor #1” section of the peer review sheet. Highlight your name in your color.
      Pass left again and repeat steps four and five using the appropriate editor section.
      Repeat step six.
      Review the comments on your essay and your peer review sheet. Make a note of any questions you have.
      Take turns being in the mush pot of your groups for a couple of minutes and discuss each essay.
    • Homework
      Read and annotate “I Just Called to Say I Love You” on page 366