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November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
November 20
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November 20

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  • 1.     Today—Doubt, Self-Reflection, and Romanticism; Essay #2 prompt; Exam #2 study guide Monday, November 18—Exam #2 Wednesday, November 20— “Introduction to The Twentieth Century and After”; Transition, Modernism, and Postmodernism; In-class Literature Circle Sunday, November 24—Essay #2 due
  • 2.         Democrat Republican Conservative Liberal Libertarian Green Independent Moderate
  • 3. vs.
  • 4. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE JEREMY BENTHAM According to John Stuart Mill, writing soon after Queen Victoria ascended the throne, one could not understand contemporary thought without noticing that it divided into two schools derived from Jeremy Bentham and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the "two great seminal minds of England in their age" (“Bentham” 214). As Mill explained in a second essay in The London and Westminster Review, the two men are each other's "completing counterpart": the strong points of each correspond to the weak points of the other. Whoever could master the premises and combine the methods of both, would possess the entire English philosphy of their age. Coleridge used to say that every one is born either a Platonist or an Aristotelian: it may be similarly affirmed, that every Englishman of the present day is by implication either a Benthamite or a Coleridgean (“Coleridge” 262). Landow, George P. “Bentham and Coleridge: Seminal Minds.” The Victorian Web. 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.
  • 5. TORY RADICALS, CHRISTIAN SOCIALISTS, OR MARXISTS need for strong central government, welfare or interventionist state; antiaristocratic; ambivalent attitude toward middle class LIBERAL PROGRESSIVES, LIBERALS, OR RATIONALISTS middle-class fear of government intervention, emphasis upon freedom of action LIBERTARIAN Landow, George P. “Movements and Currents in Nineteenth-Century British Thought.” The Victorian Web. 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.
  • 6. LEGALIZING DRUGS Landow, George P. “Bentham and Coleridge: Seminal Minds.” The Victorian Web. 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.
  • 7. PROSTITUTION Landow, George P. “Bentham and Coleridge: Seminal Minds.” The Victorian Web. 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.
  • 8. POLYGAMY Landow, George P. “Bentham and Coleridge: Seminal Minds.” The Victorian Web. 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.
  • 9. MOTORCYCLE HELMETS Landow, George P. “Bentham and Coleridge: Seminal Minds.” The Victorian Web. 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.
  • 10. ELIMINATION OF CERTIFICATION FOR TEACHERS AND DOCTORS Landow, George P. “Bentham and Coleridge: Seminal Minds.” The Victorian Web. 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.
  • 11. OTHER ISSUES? Landow, George P. “Bentham and Coleridge: Seminal Minds.” The Victorian Web. 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.
  • 12. Study for Exam #2

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