February 6 (101A)

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February 6 (101A)

  1. 1. Roughly what proportion of the world's population is fluent or competent in English? A. one person in a thousand B. one in a hundred C.one in ten D.one in four
  2. 2. Changes on due dates are reflected in the Essay #1 prompt
  3. 3. Avoiding academic dishonesty
  4. 4. Thanks to the OWL at Purdue for information, definitions, and exercises. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/
  5. 5.  Obviously plagiarism:     Buying, stealing, or borrowing a paper (including from the web) Hiring someone to write your paper for you Copying large sections of text from a source without quotation marks or proper citation Also plagiarism:   Using a source too closely when paraphrasing Building on someone else’s words or ideas without citing their work (spoken or written)
  6. 6.      Words or ideas presented in a magazine, book, newspaper, song, TV program, movie, Web page, computer program, letter, advertisement, or any other medium Information you gain through interviewing or conversing with another person, face to face, over the phone, or in writing When you copy the exact words or a unique phrase When you reprint any diagrams, illustrations, charts, pictures, or other visual materials When you reuse or repost any electronically-available media, including images, audio, video, or other media
  7. 7. Document any words, ideas, or other productions that originate somewhere outside of you.
  8. 8.    You do not need to cite information that is considered “common knowledge” or is a generally accepted fact. Generally, something does not need to be cited if it is a fact that can be found in at least three reliable sources. Examples: The sky is blue. Approximately 6 million Jews were killed in the Holocaust.  The Pythagorean theorem is a2 + b2 = c2.    “Common knowledge” applies to specific, brief facts.
  9. 9.  You do not need to cite when you are writing your own experiences, your own observations, your own insights, your own thoughts, or your own conclusions on a subject.
  10. 10.  There are three ways to use the work of someone else:     Quoting Paraphrasing Summarizing Because we want you to build your own understanding of the information through an assignment, most of your use of another person’s work will be in paraphrases and summaries.
  11. 11.   Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. A paraphrase must also be attributed to the original source. Paraphrased material is usually shorter than the original passage, taking a somewhat broader segment of the source and condensing it slightly. Paraphrasing is a useful skill because the mental process required for successful paraphrasing helps you to grasp the full meaning of the original.
  12. 12. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning. Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card. Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase. Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form. Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source. Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  13. 13.  Summarizing involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s). Once again, it is necessary to attribute summarized ideas to the original source. Summaries are significantly shorter than the original and take a broad overview of the source material.
  14. 14.     What is Rosenhan’s experiment and what did he find? What is Spitzer’s position? What happens when Slater reenacts the experiment? What do you think?
  15. 15.    Look on page 70 (first two paragraphs) With a partner, paraphrase the two paragraphs Write your paraphrase on the board
  16. 16. To integrate a paraphrase properly within a paragraph, a good writer usually has (1) At least one sentence to introduce the paraphrase, (2) the paraphrase itself, and (3) at least one sentence to comment on the paraphrase.
  17. 17. Meat: paraphrase with proper documentation Top piece of bread: at least one sentence to introduce the paraphrase Bottom piece of bread: at least one sentence to explain, comment on, or provide an example of the paraphrase (usually the majority of the paragraph)
  18. 18. Begin with a topic sentence that gives the reader a sense of what the single main idea of the paragraph will be. This sentence should be one of the “supporting reasons” for your thesis statement. It should have opinion!
  19. 19. This is the part of your paragraph where you support your topic sentence by including a specific point taken from the “proof text” (the essay, article, book, everyday life, etc. you are writing about or analyzing). The evidence is a paraphrase or quotation.
  20. 20. You want to explain your topic sentence and its connection to the evidence. You want to include your analysis here. Why did you include the quotation or paraphrase? What do you want to say about it? You should include specific examples to illustrate your points (these examples should come from you, not the source), but be sure to show how your examples connect to your statement (topic sentence). This section should comprise the majority of the paragraph.
  21. 21. Statement: I used to believe that if a particular subject was difficult for me that I was just not gifted with intelligence in that area; now that I am moving toward a growth mindset, I understand that my knowledge in anything is dependent on the amount of effort I put into learning.
  22. 22. Evidence: According to Carol Dweck, students with a fixed mindset believe that people are naturally smart in certain subjects whereas those with a growth mindset understand that they are capable of understanding anything with the right amount of effort.
  23. 23. Explanation: I tell people that I am bad at math, but I am working on changing that attitude to a more realistic self-view. I earned average grades in my high school math classes, but the concepts did not come easily to me. In my college algebra class, I watched as other students breezed through tests and quizzes and I felt like I was struggling to pass. Instead of realizing that I needed to put more work into the class, I put the responsibility on others. I decided the teacher was boring. I imagined that the other students just understood the material right away. I began to miss class and skip assignments. Of course, my actions resulted in a failing grade. At the time, I was quick to shift the blame to other people and circumstances, but the truth was that I was making excuses rather than trying because I did not want to try and fail. Doing so would affirm my biggest fear: I was dumb. I have come to realize that I truly earned the F, not because of my lack of natural math skills, but because of my own lack of effort.
  24. 24. I used to believe that if a particular subject was difficult for me that I was just not gifted with intelligence in that area; now that I am moving toward a growth mindset, I understand that my knowledge in anything is dependent on the amount of effort I put into learning. According to Carol Dweck, students with a fixed mindset believe that people are naturally smart in certain subjects whereas those with a growth mindset understand that they are capable of understanding anything with the right amount of effort. I tell people that I am bad at math, but I am working on changing that attitude to a more realistic self-view. I earned average grades in my high school math classes, but the concepts did not come easily to me. In my college algebra class, I watched as other students breezed through tests and quizzes and I felt like I was struggling to pass. Instead of realizing that I needed to put more work into the class, I put the responsibility on others. I decided the teacher was boring. I imagined that the other students just understood the material right away. I began to miss class and skip assignments. Of course, my actions resulted in a failing grade. At the time, I was quick to shift the blame to other people and circumstances, but the truth was that I was making excuses rather than trying because I did not want to try and fail. Doing so would affirm my biggest fear: I was dumb. I have come to realize that I truly earned the F, not because of my lack of natural math skills, but because of my own lack of effort.
  25. 25.     Choose your favorite paraphrase from the work on the board Integrate that paraphrase using the SEE method When you are finished, get your work checked off by me and you are free to go Do not begin yet—we’ll go through the last few items of class first
  26. 26.   Cognitive dissonance refers to a situation involving conflicting attitudes, beliefs or behaviors. This produces a feeling of discomfort leading to an alteration in one of the attitudes, beliefs or behaviors to reduce the discomfort and restore balance etc. Taken from http://www.simplypsychology.org/cognitive-dissonance.html
  27. 27. A. B. C. D. E. Plagiarism lesson Paraphrasing lesson “On Being Sane in Insane Places” SEE paragraphs Essay #1 prompt and rubric
  28. 28. A. B. C. D. E. Plagiarism lesson Paraphrasing lesson “On Being Sane in Insane Places” SEE paragraphs Essay #1 prompt and rubric
  29. 29.     Read “Quieting the Mind” starting on page 112 Write a one-page critical analysis of the chapter using at least one well-integrated paraphrase (due Tuesday at 1:40 p.m. to Turnitin and worth 10 points) Draw a “Start” picture and a “Success” picture for our class map Participate in the weekly discussion (post due Thursday and replies due Sunday)

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