Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Chapter 15  To he West Powerpoint
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Chapter 15 To he West Powerpoint

1,957
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,957
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
35
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 15- To the West
    • Women’s voting
    • Native American Resistance
    • Farming, Mining, and Populism
  • 2. What roles did women play in the West?
  • 3. What two acts created by Congress pushed for Western Settlement?
    • The 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act
      • Allowed Eastern States to sell portions of Western land to raise money to build Agricultural Universities
    • The 1862 Homestead Act
      • A settler would receive a 160 acre farm as long as they were…
        • 21 years of age or head of family
        • U.S. Citizens or in process of naturalization
        • Paid the $5 registration fee
        • Farmed on the land for 5 years
        • Built a house on the land
  • 4. What troubles did pioneers face in the West?
  • 5. Though some parts of the West were filled with prostitution, gambling, and alcohol, a genuine respect was gained for females in most other areas of the West, such as the farming communities. How did the state of Wyoming reflect this?
    • Wyoming became the first state that allowed women to vote when they gained statehood and created their Constitution in 1890.
  • 6. Why were the African Americans that moved from the South to the West called Exodusters?
    • Relates back to the Exodus of Israelites begin led by Moses in the year 1500 B.C. According to the Old Testament of the Bible, the Israelites left Egypt to evade having all of the males drowned in the Nile River, as was warned by the Pharoah. They also left Egypt to flee from slavery, where all Israelites were slaves to the Pharoah. They moved with Moses to Israel, which was known as the Motherland.
  • 7. The Exodusters
    • The Exodusters fled Southern persecution due to the Black Codes as over 50,000 moved to the West, most of which moved with Benjamin “Pap” Singleton to Kansas settlements. Singleton felt that freeing the Freed African Americans from the Black Codes was his duty and he recruited as many as possible.
  • 8. What troubles did these Exodusters face?
    • Most did not have any starter money to begin farming with and they did not have any experience with wheat or corn
  • 9. When did the U.S. Government first begin to move Native Americans into Reservations?
    • The first mass removal of Native Americans to U.S. land occurred with the Indian Removal Act of the 1830’s, signed by President Andrew Jackson to move the Seminole Indians, Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Cherokee from their lands in the deep South. These Native American tribes were offered lands within Oklahoma in a reservation.
  • 10. Apache Wars (New Mexico)
    • Why were they fought?
      • As U.S. citizens began mass migration into the West in the 1870’s, the Apaches began attacking those that were encroaching upon their area of the Rio Grande River Valley in Southern Arizona.
  • 11. Apache Wars (New Mexico)
    • What attack occurred which outraged President Ulysses S. Grant and caused most of the Apache to accept living upon reservation land?
      • The Camp Grant Massacre- 150 White villagers and U.S. troops around the Rio Grande River attacked the San Carlos Apache tribe on April 28, 1871. They set fire to tipis, killing women and children as they slept. Most of the males within the tribe were away hunting food for their family. Overall, the attack of the Camp Grant Massacre left 150 dead men, women, and children. The most disappointing point within this attack is that the San Carlos Apache tribe was known to be peaceful and one of the tribes that did not attack white settlers.
  • 12. Apache Warriors
    • Who were the main two leaders of the Apache warriors who refused to accept being placed upon a reservation?
    -Geronimo -Victorio
  • 13. How did the Apache Wars end?
    • Victorio was killed on October, 15, 1880 as the Federal Troops defeated him and captured him in Mexico.
    • Geronimo had a lot of success against the Federal Troops as he would attack and then flee into the desert and into caves. In March of 1886, he was almost defeated, but he fled away only to be caught at Skeleton Canyon, 65 miles South of Apache Pass on September 4, 1886.
  • 14. Cheyenne and the Sand Creek Massacre (Colorado)
    • What was the motivation of the government to remove these Native Americans from their lands in Colorado?
      • Gold was found in Pike’s Peak, Colorado in the 1850’s and in Montana in the early 1860’s. A faction of the Cheyenne began to attack gold-rushers, though most of the Cheyenne, under the leadership of Black Kettle, wanted peace. These attacks set the stage for the Sand Creek Massacre made by the U.S. troops at Fort Lyon, Colorado against the Cheyenne.
    Cheyenne Chief Black Kettle
  • 15. Cheyenne and the Sand Creek Massacre (Colorado)
    • Who was the leader of the U.S. troops who made this attack upon the Cheyenne? –Colonel John M. Chivington
  • 16. Cheyenne and the Sand Creek Massacre (Colorado)
    • What occurred during this Sand Creek Massacre?
      • After Black Kettle arranged a counsel with the leaders of the U.S. troops, where a measure of peace was agreed to by both parties, Chivington arranged for an attack upon the Cheyenne, while the Cheyenne believed that if they raised the U.S. flag above their tribal lands, the U.S. troops would not attack. Chivington’s troops attacked men, women, and children, wiping out the Cheyenne in this particular area. Estimates say that up to 400 Cheyenne were killed, scalped, and mutilated during this attack.
  • 17. What repercussions did Chivington face after the massacre?
    • Chivington was court-martialed for his role in the Sand Creek Massacre but was never charged with any crime since he was immediately removed from service in the U.S. Army
  • 18. The Sioux Wars (North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming)
    • How did the fighting begin between the Sioux and U.S. troops?
      • The Sioux fought to keep the U.S. from building railroad line around their settlements in South Dakota and Montana. The initial attack was made by Sioux as they slaughtered 80 soldiers at Fort Kearny in December of 1866.
  • 19. The Sioux Wars (North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming)
    • How did the Sioux outsmart the U.S. troops?
      • They created a decoy to entice the U.S. troops to follow a few Sioux. This decoy was made up of a few Sioux that fired arrows against the U.S. troops at Fort Kearny and then they remained at the top of the hill waiting for U.S. troops to follow. The U.S. troops gave chase, only to find hundreds of Sioux waiting to attack the 80 U.S. Troops.
  • 20. The Sioux Wars (North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming)
    • What were the results of the Chief Red Cloud’s War?
      • Convinced by the U.S. leaders that their eventual devastation would occur if they did not give up fighting and live upon a reservation, the Sioux decided to accept movement onto a Reservation in the Dakotas.
  • 21. The Sioux Wars (North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming)
    • Why did the Black Hills War occur between the Sioux and the U.S. troops?
      • The U.S. allowed miners to dig part of the Sioux reservation land, therefore inciting hatred of the U.S. for the Sioux and bringing on the Black Hills War
  • 22. The Sioux Wars (North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming)
    • Where was General George Custer killed along with all of his men?
      • Custer was killed along with his 200 soldiers at Little Big Horn. Custer was warned not to move unto the area known as Little Big Horn, but he neglected to follow these warnings, and Custer was surprised by the overwhelming numbers of Sioux and he was defeated.
  • 23. The Sioux Wars (North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming)
    • Why did the Massacre at Wounded Knee occur?
      • Once again the Sioux were pressured to remain peaceful and to hand over all of their guns to the U.S. Government. While handing over their guns, a Sioux warrior fired a gun and the U.S. troops began firing back. The U.S. troops fired on everyone in the tribe.
  • 24. The Sioux Wars (North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming)
    • How many individuals were killed in the Massacre at Wounded Knee?
      • 150
      • Were only male warriors killed?
        • No, out of all of the Native Americans located at Wounded Knee, only 120 of the 350 residents were men. Many of those that died were women and children.
        • U.S. troops only suffered 29 deaths and 39 wounded
  • 25. Governmental Acts created by Congress that regulated Native Americans
    • Dawes Act of 1887- Required Native Americans to farm individual plots within their reservations, plots given to each family headed by a male. Many Native Americans simply sold their land to speculators and, by 1934, Native American land had shrunk by 5%.
  • 26. When did the U.S. Government first begin to move Native Americans into Reservations?
    • The first mass removal of Native Americans to U.S. land occurred with the Indian Removal Act of the 1830’s, signed by President Andrew Jackson to move the Seminole Indians, Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Cherokee from their lands in the deep South. These Native American tribes were offered lands within Oklahoma in a reservation.
  • 27. Governmental Acts created by Congress that regulated Native Americans (cont.)
    • 1889 Distribution of Native American Reservation land to Homesteaders
      • -In the early 1880’s, some U.S. settlers started moving onto Indian Reservation land in Oklahoma. These individuals felt that the Native Americans did not have a claim to the land and they began claiming it for themselves. Historians call these individuals “boomers” due to the land boom they caused in moving to the Reservation land. The government stepped in, arrested those who moved onto the reservation, and decided to control future settlement by offering 2 Million acres of land in Oklahoma to white homesteaders. The initial homesteaders that filed paperwork and waited for the President’s decree at Noon on April 22, 1889 to settle the land later took on the name “Boomers.”
  • 28. Governmental Acts created by Congress that regulated Native Americans (continued)
    • The Sooners
      • Some individuals snuck onto the Reservation land the night of April 21 and hid in trees and brush until noon the next day. When the time came to claim land, they went to the piece of land they wanted and laid claim to it before the Boomers could. These individuals were called the “Sooners.”